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Best Cody Gough podcasts we could find (updated August 2020)
Best Cody Gough podcasts we could find
Updated August 2020
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The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
 
We're a lifestyle podcast hosted by adult gamers trying to juggle our hobbies with the increasing demands of the "real world." Join us each week to catch up on what we've been up to lately, whether it's saving the world from space aliens or learning how to change a diaper. Check out our web site for links to connect with us on YouTube, iTunes, Stitcher, and more, at gamelifebalance.us. And if you like what you hear, then please leave us a review!
 
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show series
 
Forrest Galante, host of “Extinct or Alive” on Animal Planet, explains why sharks are so important to their ecosystems. You’ll also learn about giant prehistoric sea scorpions called Eurypterids who used to rule the sea and how cats affect online dating. More from Animal Planet’s “Extinct or Alive” and host Forrest Galante: Extinct or Alive officia…
 
Learn about whether sharks can really smell a drop of blood from a mile away; how some sharks give birth from two uteruses (and why that’s not even the weirdest part); and the complicated way interstellar travel can mess with language. Can sharks really smell a drop of blood from a mile away? by Grant Currin Shark Smell Myth Found Fishy. (2013, Jul…
 
To celebrate Shark Week, learn about why people are afraid of sharks; how scientists discovered four new species of “walking” sharks (also called epaulette sharks); and how enhanced rock weathering might help us fight climate change with rocks. People are afraid of sharks for 3 psychological reasons by Kelsey Donk Ipsos editor. (2015, July 7). Shar…
 
Learn about the Luhn algorithm (the genius math behind credit card numbers) and how parents’ brains synchronize when they’re together. Then, play along at home and test your podcast knowledge with this month’s Curiosity Challenge trivia game. The genius math behind credit card numbers by Cameron Duke Berry, N. (2014, January 8). How Credit Card Num…
 
Learn the surprising reason why religious people tend to have more children; why sea turtles are actually pretty clumsy navigators; and where astronomers found the center of our solar system (spoiler alert: it’s not the center of our sun). Evolution explains why religious people have more children by Kelsey Donk New research examines links between …
 
Learn about how culture plays a role in feeling sick; that time scientists measured all the light in the known universe; and what Jurassic Park got wrong about the Dilophosaurus, that venomous dinosaur with the frilly collar. Culture plays a role in feeling sick by Kelsey Donk Researchers study role culture plays in feeling sick. (2020). EurekAlert…
 
Learn about why you have tiny rocks in your ears; why the self-congruity effect of music says you may prefer music by artists who have a similar personality to you; and how chemotherapy began as a chemical weapon. There are tiny rocks in your ears that help you detect motion by Cameron Duke Inner Ear “Rock Slides” Lead To Vertigo. (n.d.). NPR.org. …
 
Learn about why some words are more memorable than others; how hair growth works; and how fish end up in landlocked lakes. Brain study reveals why some words are more memorable than others by Kelsey Donk NIH study finds out why some words may be more memorable than others. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-06/nion-nsf…
 
Learn about why more advertising means less happiness; how to calculate your maximum heart rate; and how parents and kids can help language researchers during the pandemic, with help from an app called KidTalk. The more ads we see, the less happy we are by Kelsey Donk Advertising Makes Us Unhappy. (2019, December 31). Harvard Business Review. https…
 
Stanford behavior scientist Dr. BJ Fogg, author of “Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything,” explains why the best new habits are tiny ones. Then, learn why human infants are late bloomers compared to other baby animals. More from Dr. BJ Fogg, Stanford behavior scientist: Pick up “Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything…
 
Stanford behavior scientist Dr. BJ Fogg explains new research into how you can pick new habits you’ll actually stick with. Then, you’ll learn about the best time of day to exercise. More from Dr. BJ Fogg, Stanford behavior scientist: Pick up “Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything” on Amazon https://amzn.to/35GQ3za Official website h…
 
Learn about how scientists and animals are benefitting from the “anthropause” during the coronavirus pandemic; why sweat from stress smells worse than regular sweat; and whether men really “see less mess” than women. We're in the "anthropause," a unique opportunity to study wildlife by Steffie Drucker McGreevy, N. (2020, July). Scientists Propose a…
 
Learn about how humans literally use their noses to navigate; why the blue blood of horseshoe crabs is essential for developing drugs like a COVID-19 vaccine; and the truth behind 5 myths about summer dangers. Humans use their noses to navigate, and both nostrils are important by Grant Currin Humans navigate with stereo olfaction. (2020). EurekAler…
 
Learn how researchers test drugs for deadly diseases like COVID-19 (without exposing participants); how Fannie Farmer transformed cooking from folk art into science; and how the Shepard scale audio illusion makes it sound like a tone is rising forever. Safety in drug trials by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Habib) Q/A: How clinical trials tes…
 
Learn about why you might feel stronger after just one workout; why the Earth’s core doesn’t melt, even though it’s so hot; and prosopagnosia, the surprising neurological condition of face blindness. Feeling stronger after one workout? It's not your muscles, it's your nervous system by Grant Currin Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning. …
 
Learn about why children develop racial prejudice unless their parents teach them otherwise; why archaeologists studying Stonehenge may have found the largest prehistoric structure in all of Europe; and why cats have vertical pupils. Children will develop racial prejudice unless their parents teach them otherwise by Kelsey Donk What white parents g…
 
Learn about why lockdown has made us need nature more than ever; why plants are green; and how microbes and parasites might actually make us healthier. Why lockdown has made us need exposure to nature more than ever by Kelsey Donk ‘Nature Deficit Disorder’ Is Really a Thing. (2020, June 23). The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/23/pa…
 
Learn about whether adult neurogenesis can help humans grow new brain cells; the super cool way dolphins learn how to use tools; and how keeping good “zeitgeber hygiene” by sticking to a regular routine can keep you happy and healthy. Can you grow new brain cells as an adult? by Grant Currin Yong, E. (2018, March 7). Study: Does Adult Neurogenesis …
 
Learn about how spies can use light bulbs to eavesdrop on conversations; why atoms remind us of our solar system; and how you predictably lower your standards when waiting for the best option. Please vote for Curiosity Daily in the 2020 Podcast Awards! Just register, select Curiosity Daily in the categories of People’s Choice, Education, and Scienc…
 
Learn about whether chocolate actually causes acne breakouts; how to get around Miller’s law, which describes the limits of your short-term memory; and why one of the first gallbladder surgeries happened on a kitchen table. Does chocolate actually cause breakouts? by Andrea Michelson Kitchens, S. (2012, June 5). Does Chocolate Cause Acne? A Top Der…
 
Learn about the first physical evidence that shows how our brains store short-term memory; EndeavorRx, the first ever prescription video game; and why hummingbirds can see colors that you can’t. Scientists may have found how short term memory is physically stored by Andrea Michelson Possible physical trace of short-term memory found. (2020). EurekA…
 
Learn about why “everyday sadism” might help explain trolling and bullying; why our quality of sleep is worse during lockdown (and how to fix it); and a breakthrough random number generation algorithm that could help researchers analyze complex systems. Plus: Cody nerds out about Games Done Quick and video game speed runs! Blame "everyday sadism" f…
 
Learn about how saturated fat can make it harder for you to focus; why it matters that animals have regional accents; and why Mars used to have rings. A single meal high in saturated fat could make it harder to focus by Kelsey Donk Our ability to focus may falter after eating one meal high in saturated fat. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekaler…
 
Learn about how the meaning maintenance model explains the way our brains make sense of the nonsensical; and how the black hole information paradox may be explained by black holes acting like holograms. Plus: June’s Curiosity Challenge trivia segment! How do we make sense of the nonsensical? Meet the "meaning maintenance model" by Kelsey Donk Robso…
 
Learn about how archaeologists used ground-penetrating radar to map an entire Roman city underground without digging; the gross but cutting-edge science of creating human hair in a lab; and why you see way less color than you probably think. Archaeologists mapped an entire Roman city underground WITHOUT DIGGING (Falerii Novi) by Grant Currin Entire…
 
Learn about how scientists analyzed fast radio bursts to find the “missing matter” in the universe; why “discretion elimination” is more effective than implicit bias training; and how the femme fatale firefly lures mates to their doom. Scientists have found the 'missing matter' in the universe by Grant Currin Half the universe’s ordinary matter was…
 
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