show episodes
 
Unreserved is the radio space for Indigenous community, culture, and conversation. Host Falen Johnson takes you straight into Indigenous Canada, from Halifax to Haida Gwaii, from Shamattawa to Ottawa, introducing listeners to the storytellers, culture makers and community shakers from across the country.
 
The World and Everything in It is an Apple Podcasts top 100 News program delivering essential headlines, field reporting, interviews, and expert analysis. Find original coverage you can't get elsewhere, such as a weekly overview of every Supreme Court case, biblical cultural analysis, and key international stories. This podcast is a product of listener-supported WORLD Radio, which provides sound journalism grounded in God's Word.
 
Northwest Wine Radio is a weekly, hour-long show featuring interviews with those part of the local wine industry. Winemakers, industry reps, chefs with great food pairings and recipe ideas — all these people telling the stories behind the bottle. We’ll also introduce you to the brewers, distillers, and cider makers of the region in this light-hearted show that makes wine and other craft beverages more approachable and fun!
 
The Radio Disclosure Radio Show is focused on a wide area of subjects that range from UFO's Ghosts, The Paranormal, Hauntings, government coverups, medicine, business, industry and fraud. From the latest reported government cover up, alien abductions, medical problems, social problems, and the latest in the world of phenomenon. Radio Disclosure uncovers the facts and asks the questions that conventional mainstream media refuses to disclose. Radio Disclosure is hosted by Ted Randall and Matt ...
 
American politics is undergoing seismic changes that will alter the course of history. At Words Matter, we believe that facts, evidence, truth and objective reality are necessary and vital in public discourse. Our hosts and guests have broad experience in government, politics and journalism -- this gives them a unique ability to explain recent events and place them in historic context. Together, with fellow journalists, elected officials, policy-makers and thought-leaders, they will analyze ...
 
Generation Justice’s mission is to inspire youth to become media makers committed to social transformation. Generation Justice trains teens to approach journalism from a social justice and media justice framework. This is a multi-media project that gives voice to activism– locally, nationally and internationally. The end desire of Generation Justice is that youth will leave our program more educated about community strengths and problems and that they will have the, critical thinking, inter- ...
 
In 1971, a young, incorrigible mischief-maker named Dennis Mitchell became the newest neighbor of President Richard M. Nixon. The Mitchell boy, nicknamed Dennis "The Menace" by the President's staff, pushes and pesters Nixon relentlessly and, eventually, his shenanigans come to influence all matter of White House affairs right up to its incredible downfall in this astonishing 1990 radio documentary that has been "unearthed" after decades of obscurity.
 
NDNs on the Airwaves was developed from the need to know more about the recent history of native radio, the current state of native radio and where native radio is going in the future. This series gives voice to those who are passionate producers of radio, grateful musicians and individuals who help us understand how radio both reflects and shapes Indigenous cultures all across our territories. There is a common thread tying it all together, and that is Indigenous voices. This series offers ...
 
With over 24 years of community development experience, Braswell is the executive director of Fathers Incorporated, a company he formed in 2004. Since its inception, the agency's main focus has been on the development of support services for fathers through the capacity building of not-for-profit organizations and education of the broader public, to include policy makers, government, business, faith-based and philanthropists. In 2011, Braswell changed the agency's mission to become the numbe ...
 
Miles Wheeler, named by his father and extremely talented jazz musician, after the musically inclined great Miles Davis, need I say more, but its only fair to the world that Masspike Miles’ history become exposed. Miles was born into a family of true talent from every aspect of the entertainment industry, early into his childhood, consistancy from the family tree, showed up again and that is when the birth of Masspike Miles came into play.. Miles born December 31, 1980, in Sacramento,Califor ...
 
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show series
 
Maurice Wilson was a World War 1 veteran who was determined to climb Mount Everest. When he announced he was going to crash land his Gipsy Moth near the base of the mountain and then climb the rest of the way the British authorities tried desperately to stop him from what they saw as a ridiculous plan. Just how close did he get to reaching the summ…
 
The BBC’s enemies are legion, and yet in spite of every scandal, politically and ideologically motivated attacks, and to be fair, outrages – the most recent being the news of Martin Bashir’s skulduggery with Princess Diana, the BBC nonetheless continues to enjoy widespread community support.But in a constantly changing media environment, what are t…
 
Anna Johansen Brown reports on a new, bipartisan bill that aims to help bail the U.S. Postal Service out of its financial hole; European correspondent Jenny Lind Schmitt reports from Geneva on the meeting between President Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin of Russia; and Paul Butler talks to a sunscreen expert on how to pick the best sun tan lotion for …
 
Mountains have often been the location for spiritual experiences, or breakthroughs. On Soul Search today, we're turning to the mountains in our third — and final — episode on Sacred Landscapes. We meet Dr Thomas Michael, an expert on the religious significance of mountains in Eastern and Western thought, and Gary Khor, Grandmaster of tai chi, who g…
 
Nova Scotia, April 18-19, 2020 Over a period of thirteen hours, a 51 year old denturist carried out Canada’s most deadly act of mass murder. Dressed in a police officer’s uniform and driving a replica police cruiser, this murderer would leave a trail of innocent victims and burnt homes in his wake. In total twenty two Nova Scotians lost their lives…
 
It has only recently emerged that it was Vincent van Gogh's sister-in-law - the wife of his art dealer brother Theo van Gogh - who was largely responsible for generating recognition and financial value for Vincent's work. She did this as a novice in the art world, as a young widow, after both her husband and Vincent had died.…
 
On Washington Wednesday, Mary Reichard talks to WORLD’s Mindy Belz about the latest developments in Afghanistan as U.S. troops leave the country; on World Tour, Onize Ohikere reports on international news; and WJI graduate Rachel McClamroch visits a tulip festival in Iowa. Plus: commentary from Janie B. Cheaney, a waterlogged deal, and the Wednesda…
 
This week on Generation Justice, we aired an insightful interview about the history of pride month with Marshall Martinez, the Executive Director at Equality New Mexico, and a powerful commentary about coming out, by long time GJ member, Jaron Kie. This production is still available for you to hear now! Click the link below or in our bio and catch …
 
Sarah Schweinsberg reports on why the cost of meat is rising while the price for cattle is falling; Mary Reichard talks to Jonathan Shanzer from the Foundation for Defense of Democracies about the political shakeup in Israel; and WORLD editor in chief Marvin Olasky talks to novelist Sarah Hulse. Plus: commentary from Kim Henderson, beginning life a…
 
On Legal Docket, Mary Reichard dives into Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s advice to Yale law grads; on the Monday Moneybeat, Nick Eicher talks to financial analyst David Bahnsen about the latest economic news; and on History Book, Katie Gaultney recounts significant events from the past. Plus: the Monday morning news. Support The World and Everything in …
 
Not THAT Lindsay Graham. This week we profile one of our favorite podcasts American History Tellers. The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? American History Tellers will t…
 
Canadians have a reputation as being polite, considerate, and kind to the point of annoying. In many cases the stereotypes are accurate but there are some real pricks out there and our guest spends a considerable amount of time and energy making it harder for them to spread targeted Hate. Tonight, we are joined by Peter Smith, a journalist with the…
 
Trees have a special place in the human imagination and they feature in many of the world’s cultural and religious traditions. The ancient Hebrew poets even imagined trees themselves shouting for joy in praise of a divine creator. Today we explore the forest as a sacred landscape in Northern Ethiopia, and at the Wat Buddha Dhamma Monastery nestled …
 
On Culture Friday, Nick Eicher and Myrna Brown talk to John Stonestreet about colleges that coddle left and punch right; Collin Garbarino reviews a new streaming series on Amazon Prime that puts a fantastical spin on American history; and Myrna meets a trio of teenage brothers who are carrying on a gospel tradition. Plus: Tasmanian Devil boom, and …
 
In November 1989, the Berlin Wall fell and the GDR collapsed. 91,000 Stasi employees, many of them experienced officers with access to highly personal information, found themselves unemployed overnight. There is a myth that most of them were old men who disappeared quietly to live off their state pensions. But this was not the case. Former FBI agen…
 
Esther Eaton reports on an effort in California to change how schools teach math; Mary Reichard talks to General Thomas Spoehr about President Biden’s proposed Defense budget; and Kim Henderson tells a story about a rocking chair and reconciliation after the Civil War. Plus: commentary from Cal Thomas, chocolate-dipped cicadas, and the Thursday mor…
 
On Washington Wednesday, Mary Reichard talks to Michael Rubin from the American Enterprise Institute about the Biden administration’s negotiations with Iran over a renewed nuclear deal; on World Tour, Onize Ohikere reports on international news; and one church’s efforts to protect children from pornography. Plus: commentary from Joel Belz, and the …
 
In a landmark ruling, a Dutch Court has held the Royal Dutch Shell Company liable for its contributions to climate change, claiming its operations undermined basic guaranteed human rights. This could have far reaching consequences for other oil companies and climate-justice organisations are working to ensure this.…
 
Sarah Schweinsberg reports on the latest developments in the debate over how the COVID-19 pandemic started; Mary Reichard talks to Anthony Ruggiero with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies about the foreign policy implications of the pandemic’s origins; and Jenny Lind Schmitt visits a training facility in Switzerland where horses learn how to…
 
In the past Nighttime has spent a considerable amount of time discussing the stories of strange lights in our skies. We may get to some of them tonight as well but rather than focusing on the lights in the sky, in this episode, we are going to consider what happens when the damn things crash to the ground. In this episode of Nighttime, Canadian UFO…
 
This week we highlight presidential leadership and one of the most important civil rights speeches ever delivered by a sitting American president. By June of 1963, John F. Kennedy has been president for nearly two and a half years. While Kennedy had long privately expressed his deep moral objections to the treatment of black people in American soci…
 
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