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Best Mercatus Center at George Mason University podcasts we could find (updated February 2020)
Best Mercatus Center at George Mason University podcasts we could find
Updated February 2020
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The Hayek Program Podcast includes audio from lectures, interviews, and discussions of scholars and visitors from the F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. The F. A. Hayek Program is devoted to the promotion of teaching and research on the institutional arrangements that are suitable for the support of free and prosperous societies. Implicit in this statement is the presumption that those arrangements ...
 
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In this 1984 lecture, sponsored by the Center for the Study of Market Processes in conjunction with the George Mason University Economics department, Nobel-Laureate F. A. Hayek discusses the evolution of morality and social norms, arguing that they result from unplanned, emergent processes. He contrasts this conclusion with other philosophical acco…
 
To Tim Harford, mistakes are fascinating. “We often only understand how something works when it breaks,” he says, explaining why there’s such an emphasis on errors throughout his work. They also tend to make great stories, which can stoke the curiosity necessary to change minds. A former persuasive speaking champion, he was made an Officer of the O…
 
On this episode of the Hayek Program Podcast, we begin the spring semester with a book panel discussion of Public Governance and the Classical-Liberal Perspective written by Paul Dragos Aligica, Peter J. Boettke, and Vlad Tarko. Peter Boettke began the discussion with an overview of the book and the ongoing debate about governance generated by the …
 
In his new book, Ezra Klein argues that polarization in America has become centered on partisan political identities, which has subsumed virtually every form of identity, be it where we live, what team we root for, the church we attend, or any other. This stacked form of polarization thus carries much more weight and is activated by a wider range o…
 
The current global-justice literature starts from the premise that world poverty results mostly from the actions of governments and citizens of rich countries. As a result, it recommends vast coercive transfers of wealth from rich to poor societies alongside stronger governance. But is it possible that global injustice is actually home-grown? If so…
 
When Reid Hoffman creates a handle for some new network or system, his usual choice is “Quixotic.” At an early age, his love of tabletop games inspired him to think of life as a heroic journey, where people come together in order to accomplish lofty things. This framing also prompted him to consider the rules and systems that guide society—and how …
 
This bonus episode features audio from the Holberg Debate in Bergen, Norway between Tyler and Slavoj Žižek held on December 7, 2019. They discuss the reasons Slavoj (still) considers himself a Communist, why he calls The Handmaid’s Tale “nostalgia for the present,” what he likes about Greta Thunberg, what Marx got right about the commodification of…
 
On this episode of the podcast, the Hayek Program hosts a book panel on “Humanomics: Moral Sentiments and the Wealth of Nations for the Twenty-First Century” by Nobel Laureate Vernon Smith and Bart Wilson. In the panel, participants explore the main themes and applications of the book including how integrating insights from Adam Smith’s work into c…
 
Want to support future conversations? Visit conversationswithtyler.com/donate. Long before Abhijit Banerjee won the 2019 economics Nobel with Michael Kremer and Esther Duflo, he was a fellow graduate student at Harvard with Tyler. For Tyler, Abhijit is one of the brightest economic minds he’s ever met, and “a brilliant theorist who decided the futu…
 
Want to support future conversations? Visit conversationswithtyler.com/donate. For this special retrospective episode, producer Jeff Holmes sat down with Tyler to discuss the past year in conversations and more, including who was most challenging guest to prep for, the most popular—and the most underrated—conversation, a test of Tyler’s knowledge c…
 
Want to support future conversations? Visit conversationswithtyler.com/donate. Esther Duflo’s advice to students? Spend time in the field. “It's only through this exposure that you can learn how wrong most of your intuitions are and preconceptions are,” she explains. For Duflo, it was time spent in the Soviet Union on the brink of collapse. While t…
 
In our final installment of the Hayek Program’s 2019 Future of Work Conference, we hear from Elizabeth Rhodes, research director for the Basic Income Project at Y Combinator Research. In her talk, she shares her research experiences in projects relating to a guaranteed basic income, including research on how she believes recent economic growth has …
 
What determines the economic, social, and political trajectories of nations? Why were settlers in colonies like Jamestown and Australia able to escape the extractive systems desired by their British masters, while colonial subjects in Barbados and Jamaica were not? In his latest book, Daron Acemoglu elevates the power of institutions over theories …
 
On this episode of the Hayek Program Podcast, we welcome our next keynote speaker from the Future of Work 2019 conference, Michael Munger, a professor of political science, economics, and public policy at Duke University. In his talk, he discusses the future of gigs and sharing in the economy and the role of storage could change. Additionally, he e…
 
Over the past year Mark Zuckerberg has held a series of interviews themed around technology and society. This conversation with Tyler and Patrick is the last in that series, and covers why they think the study of progress is so important, including how it could affect biomedical research, the founding of new universities and foundations, building t…
 
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