show episodes
 
Do you want to diversify your perspective on road travel? Host Noami Grevemberg and co-host Anaïs Monique dive deep into the stories and weave through the challenges, journeys and inspirations of the diverse voices who, often unheard, make the nomadic community great. Noami is a Black woman and a nomad who has been living in her campervan since 2016. She started Diversify Vanlife in 2019 in response to the lack of representation of BIPOC in the road travel community. In this show, you’ll hea ...
 
A podcast peering into all the nooks and crannies of sex, gender, and love-- and their connections to the natural world around us. Host Laura Borichevsky provides a setting for interview-based conversations covering gender, sexual hygiene, relationships and dating, practical aspects of having sex in the outdoors, and much more. Join us as we get a little dirty in the name of opening up conversations many of us want to have but so few are willing to utter out loud.
 
Stories of women who are inspired by time spent outside take the shape of interviews, in-the-field recordings, and listener submissions. These make up a tapestry of episodes covering themes such as solo hiking and camping; entrepreneurship; aging; diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI); conservation; motherhood; chronic illness; and feminism as they intersect with outdoor experiences. Hosted by Gale Straub.
 
Composers Datebook™ is a daily two-minute program designed to inform, engage, and entertain listeners with timely information about composers of the past and present. Each program notes significant or intriguing musical events involving composers of the past and present, with appropriate and accessible music related to each.
 
Loading …
show series
 
“Das Rheingold” is the opening work in a 4-opera cycle, Wagner titled “The Ring of the Nibelungen.” No pun intended, but one of the most striking moments in that opera occurs when the Norse gods Wotan and Loge descend to Nibelheim, where the poor race of Nibelung dwarfs are toiling away under the spell of Alberich, a fellow dwarf possessing a magic…
 
Late in 1941, the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky was living in Hollywood – at 1260 North Wetherly Drive, to be precise. Notoriously unflappable, and eminently practical when it came to commissions, Stravinsky apparently did not even bat an eye when he received a phone call from the choreographer Georges Balanchine with an offer from Barnum’s Circ…
 
In 1953, the Louisville Orchestra was awarded a Rockefeller Foundation grant of $500,000 to commission, premiere, and record 20th-century music to be issued on their own label, Louisville First Edition Records. By 1997 they had released nearly 150 discs, containing more than 450 compositions by living composers.On today’s date in 1980, one of the L…
 
Today, we note two anniversaries concerning Handel and his music in London.On today’s date in 1710, the German-born composer’s music was performed in London for the very first time when excerpts from his opera “Rodrigo” were used as incidental music during a revival of Ben Jonson’s comic play “The Alchemist,” written 100 years earlier.It’s a nice h…
 
In the musical world, there are many creative people with innovative ideas, but far fewer with the ability and persistence to raise the funds necessary to realize their visions.Today, a tip of the hat to the late American composer John Duffy, who, in 1982, was President of Meet the Composer, an organization which secured funding from the National E…
 
Sex Outside Nature Quickies are short, 5-minute dives into a specific, practical topic about our bodies and the outdoors. This one features boudoir and intimate portrait photographer Janette Casolary as she provides tips for becoming more comfortable-- even confident-- in an outdoor portrait session where little to no clothing is required. From pra…
 
A remarkable shift of focus in music history occurred in the latter part of the 20th Century when performers and musicologists began turning their attention to neglected works by women composers of the past and present. Composers like Hildegard von Bingen, Clara Schumann, Amy Beach, Rebecca Clarke, and Florence Price began to receive the attention …
 
On today’s date in 1755, “Montezuma,” an opera by the German Baroque composer Carl Heinrich Graun, had its premiere performance at the Berlin Court Opera of Frederick II, King of Prussia. Frederick himself supervised the rehearsals, which isn’t all that surprising, since he had drafted the opera’s libretto.Despite his well-deserved reputation as a …
 
On today’s date in 1973, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center premiered a new work by Pierre Boulez for solo flute and seven instruments, plus interaction with an electronic computer program, which generated sounds that reacted to (and interacted with) the solo flute. The piece was titled “explosante-fixe,” which translates as “exploding-fix…
 
In essence, the music of the 18th century was an international, cosmopolitan language, but just as “nationalism” in language, culture, and politics came to the fore in the 19th century, so did the radical new idea that each nation should develop its own, distinct, “national” style of music.On today’s date in 1840, a dramatic manifestation of this n…
 
On today’s date in 1941, the final orchestral work of the Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff received its premiere performance by the Philadelphia Orchestra, led by Eugene Ormandy.It was an orchestral suite, entitled “Symphonic Dances,” and was originally planned as a triptych depicting the passage of time, with its three sections to be titled: M…
 
In one of his letters, the German poet Goethe dropped this memorable and frequently quoted line: “I call architecture frozen music.”If that’s the case, then this music might be accurately described as “unfrozen architecture,” since it was music inspired by the famous Spanish architect Antonio Gaudi, whose unfinished Temple of the Holy Family in Bar…
 
Today we celebrate hopeful beginnings – and happy endings.In Leipzig, on New Year’s Day 1724, Johann Sebastian Bach led the first performance of “Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied“ (or “Sing to the Lord a New Song” in English) – a work we now know as his Cantata 190. About 200 of Bach’s church cantatas have survived, and for the Millennium Year 2000 …
 
These days, “musical piracy” can mean anything from illegal downloads to bootleg compact discs pressed in China.But back in 1878, the smash success of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta “HMS Pinafore” resulted in a flurry of unauthorized “pirate” productions in the United States. The two resourceful Englishmen decided the best way to put a stop to i…
 
Now, 18th century opera is supposed to be a rather staid and stuffy affair. These operas invariably had happy endings, with all the messy human passion and conflicts amicably resolved by the opera’s finale. But 18th century, opera could arouse some serious emotion off-stage. In 1704, an 18-year-old composer named Georg Friedric Handel was employed …
 
It might seem odd to think of Max Bruch as a twentieth century composer. After all, his three “Greatest Hits”—his Violin Concerto in G Minor, his “Scottish Fantasy” for violin and orchestra, and his setting of the Hebraic liturgical chant “Kol nidrei” for cello and orchestra -- were all written in the 19th century.But this archetypal German Romanti…
 
On today’s date in 1734, the second cantata from the “Christmas Oratorio” of Johann Sebastian Bach had its first performance in Leipzig, Germany. This cantata takes its inspiration from Luke’s Gospel describing shepherd keeping watch over their flocks and opens with a purely instrumental Sinfonia that sets the scene, evoking the sound of the shephe…
 
In the 1930s, many Americans had a hard time making ends meet. During the Great Depression, opera and concert tickets didn’t always figure into most family’s budgets, but thanks to live radio broadcasts, American families enjoyed a veritable “Golden Age” of operatic and symphonic music in the comfort of their own homes.On Christmas Day in 1931, the…
 
On today’s date in 1871, the Opera House of Cairo, Egypt, presented the world premiere of Giuseppe Verdi’s “Aida.” The Khedive of Egypt commissioned the opera for his new theater, which had opened in 1869 with a production of Verdi’s “Rigoletto.” Here’s how Verdi himself described it to his publisher, in Verdi's customary laconic fashion: “I was in…
 
Oh, to have been in Vienna on today’s date in 1785! Wolfgang Mozart had just finished a new piano concerto a week earlier, and quite likely performed it himself for the first time as an intermission feature at a performance of the oratorio “Ester” by Karl Ditters von Dittersdorf conducted by Antonio Salieri.Now wouldn’t that have made for a good sc…
 
Whether you live in sunny California or snowy Minnesota, the arrival of the solstice means “It’s official: winter is here!” And if you were born someplace sunny, but moved to someplace snowy, the arrival of winter is pretty hard to ignore.Winter must have made an impression on the transplanted Italian composer Jean-Baptiste Lully, who was born in F…
 
On today’s date in 1934, on a radio broadcast from Moscow, the orchestral suite Prokofiev culled from his film score to “Lt. Kije” received its first performance. The original film recounted the efforts of 18th century Russian bureaucrats to invent a suitably impressive life and death for a nonexistent Russian solider, whose unusual name, actually …
 
On today’s date in 1738, a once-successful French composer died destitute in an asylum of Charenton. It was a lamentable end for the 56-year-old Jean-Joseph Mouret, who had once served the French King at the Palais Royal and whose operas had once graced the stage of the Paris Opéra. How ironic, then, that Mouret would achieve belated fame in 20th c…
 
The short career of Charles Tomlinson Griffes is one of the more tragic “might-have-beens” of American music history. Griffes died at 35 years old, in 1920, just as his music was being taken up by the major American orchestras of his day.As most American composers of his time, Griffes studied in Germany, and his early works were, not surprisingly, …
 
We all have our own profound connection to land and water that should be honored and respected, but all too often, dominant narratives of what it means to be an ‘outdoorsperson’ uplifts just one way to be outdoors. In the first episode of “See Us Outside,” Gabaccia talks with leaders from Brown Girl Surf and Charles Roundtree Bloom Project to help …
 
Creating more opportunities for access to outdoor recreation allows young women of color to define their own narratives in the outdoors. Organizations like Young Women Who Crush and Women’s Wilderness are playing a key role opening up the door to the benefits of spending time in nature. In the second episode of See Us Outside, Gabaccia explores the…
 
In a shared space amongst Women of Color, there is a unique comfort and freedom, with no need to explain yourself or hold yourself back. The four organizations highlighted on this series are in many ways a testament of the importance of affinity spaces. Their communities, beyond creating opportunities for personal development, leadership, and outdo…
 
What do we hope the future of women of color in the outdoors looks like? In the final episode of See Us Outside, we hear from leaders from across the organizations doing the work to provide outdoor opportunities, as well as the outdoor community, as they share their vision as we look ahead. About the series: This special She Explores miniseries is …
 
Bree (they/them) is a 20-something year old Black Queer non-binary nomad. In 2020, they cut their corporate strings to begin a life centered on having full autonomy of their time and purpose. Hottie, their renovated vintage RV, is now home to Bree and their two giant dogs. Aside from imagining a world without white supremacy, they fill their time w…
 
In the section of his autobiography on the 1960s, Aaron Copland wrote: “I have often called myself a ‘work-a-year’ man… and 1964 belonged to the band piece ‘Emblems.’ Among the invitations I received to compose new pieces was one from clarinetist Keith Wilson, who was president of the College Band Directors National Association, for a work to be pl…
 
Sex Outside Nature Quickies are short, 5-minute dives into a specific, practical topic about our bodies and the outdoors. This one features writer, traveler, and outdoor enthusiast Natasha Buffo who brings her background in human sexuality to the conversation to share why getting to know your body and practicing how to talk about it is essential to…
 
When Franz Schubert died in Vienna in 1828, he left behind several manuscripts of symphonies unpublished, and in some cases unperformed during his short lifetime. It wasn’t until today’s date in 1865—37 years after Schubert’s death—that his most famous Symphony received its premiere performance in his hometown of Vienna.This Symphony in B minor cam…
 
Gabaccia Moreno is passionate about creating spaces to talk about what it means to explore responsibility. In both her freelance work and in her spare time, Gabaccia works on projects to help expand the conversation around conservation and public lands to be more inclusive and to tell a deeper story of what it means to recreate in them. This dedica…
 
Filmmaker and climber Biz Young shares her evolution from creating stop-motion music videos in her dorm room to making short documentary films inspired by nature and driven by purpose. Featured in this episode: Biz Young Hosted & Produced by Gale Straub A production of Ravel Media Sponsored by IKON Pass & Danner Join the She Explores Podcast commun…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login