show episodes
 
What if Dear Abby was an investigative reporter? Each week on How To!, David Epstein (bestselling author of Range and The Sports Gene)) takes on listeners’ toughest problems and, with the help of experts, finds the answers to questions you’ve always wanted to ask, but couldn’t. Until now.
 
Brains On!® is a science podcast for curious kids and adults from American Public Media. Each week, a different kid co-host joins Molly Bloom to find answers to fascinating questions about the world sent in by listeners. Like, do dogs know they’re dogs? Or, why do feet stink? Plus, we have mystery sounds for you to guess, songs for you to dance to, and lots of facts -- all checked by experts.
 
Cosmopod is the official podcast of Cosmonaut Magazine, a project dedicated to expanding the project of scientific socialism in the 21st Century. In our feed we have a combination of podcast episodes and audio articles from our website.
 
The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
 
Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.
 
Emergence Magazine is an online publication with annual print edition exploring the threads connecting ecology, culture, and spirituality. As we experience the desecration of our lands and waters, the extinguishing of species, and a loss of sacred connection to the Earth, we look to emerging stories. Our podcast features exclusive interviews, narrated essays, stories and more. During this pandemic, we are publishing new content that explores the deeper themes and questions emerging at this t ...
 
Editors in Conversation is the official podcast of the American Society for Microbiology Journals. Editors in Conversation features discussions between ASM Journals Editors, researchers and clinicians working on the most cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences. Topics include laboratory diagnosis and clinical treatment of infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, epidemiology of infections, multidrug-resistant organisms, pharmacology of antimicrobial agents, susceptibility testing ...
 
Hi there...welcome to Mushroom Hour. Listen in as we venture into kingdom fungi with unique and beautiful humans who all share a passion for mushrooms. We'll go forage for wild mushrooms, explore their potency as nature's medicines, become citizen mycologists, transform human consciousness and learn how mushrooms inspired art, spirituality and culture throughout our history. There are so many ways that mushrooms can benefit (wo)mankind - we just need to tap into the mycelium network and let ...
 
The Undark Podcast continues our mission of illuminating the places where science intersects — and sometimes collides — with our everyday lives, in the form of audio documentaries released monthly from September to May. Scientific questions and challenges, after all, are woven deeply into our politics, our economics, our culture — and they are animated by a wide spectrum of competing values and interests. Our goal is to present rich, narrative-driven audio stories of science as it manifests ...
 
The STEM Everyday podcast focuses on how teachers can infuse STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) into their everyday lessons. We explore and share great ideas that inspire students to take ownership in their learning. Each week I interview educators, innovators, & authors who are using creative ways to add STEM to their classrooms and communities everyday!
 
The Peabody Award-winning On the Media podcast is your guide to examining how the media sausage is made. Host Brooke Gladstone examines threats to free speech and government transparency, cast a skeptical eye on media coverage of the week’s big stories and unravel hidden political narratives in everything we read, watch and hear.
 
Topics on the science of psychotherapy and psychology hosted by the editors of The Science of Psychotherapy magazine. This podcast covers the neuroscience, neurobiology, biology, sociology, brain science, and even the quantum and metaphysical elements that affect our mental well being and how understanding these elements informs the psychotherapist and psychologist.
 
Whether you’re curious about getting healthy, the Big Bang or the science of cooking, find out everything you need to know in under 30 minutes with Instant Genius. The team behind BBC Science Focus Magazine talk to world-leading experts to bring you a bite-sized masterclass on a new subject each week. Then when you’ve mastered the basics with Instant Genius. Dive deeper with Instant Genius Extra, where you’ll find longer, richer discussions about the most exciting ideas in the world of scien ...
 
Award-winning podcast hosted by voice artist Darren Marlar who narrates true stories of crime, the unexplained, and paranormal. * Ranked #2 in Podcast Magazine‘s “Best True Crime and Horror” podcasts for 2020 * Named one of the “Best Storytellers in Podcasting” in 2019 by Podcast Business Journal * Darren Marlar’s narration of “The Tell-Tale Heart” won Bronze at HEAR NOW 2020 Podcast Palooza * Reached #5 worldwide on the “HOT 50” chart for November 2020 by Podcast Magazine * Finalist for”Sto ...
 
Edited by bestselling anthologist John Joseph Adams, LIGHTSPEED is a Hugo Award-winning, critically-acclaimed digital magazine. In its pages, you'll find science fiction from near-future stories and sociological SF to far-future, star-spanning SF. Plus there's fantasy from epic sword-and-sorcery and contemporary urban tales to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folk tales. Each month, LIGHTSPEED brings you a mix of originals and reprints featuring a variety of authors, from the bestseller ...
 
Leading ADHD experts give real-life answers to questions submitted by ADD adults and parents raising children with attention deficit disorder across a range of topics covering symptoms, school, work, and family life. Download the accompanying slide presentations here: additudemag.com/adhd-expert-webinars-index (look for the episode number). Note on audio quality: This podcast is a recording of a webinar series, and the audio has been captured from telephone conversations, not recorded in a s ...
 
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN) has retained its position as the premier biotech publication since its launch in 1981. GEN publishes a print edition monthly and has additional exclusive editorial content online, including news and analysis as well as webinars, videos, and polls. GEN's unique news and technology focus covers the entire bioproduct life cycle, including drug discovery, early-stage R&D, applied research (e.g., omics, biomarkers, and diagnostics), bioprocessing, an ...
 
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show series
 
First this week, News Intern Sofia Moutinho joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss scientists concerns about advertisers looking into using our smart speakers or phones to whisper ads to us while we sleep. Next, Bina Desai, head of programs at the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre in Geneva, discusses how to predict the economic impact of human d…
 
We treat dogs like they're part of the family. But do they know they are a different species, or do they think they're just short, four-legged people? In this episode, canine cognition researcher Alexandra Horowitz helps us puzzle out this question. We’ll also find out what happens (or doesn’t) when a dog looks in the mirror. Dogs are always dozing…
 
Joan Armatrading discusses her 22nd album, Consequences, and writing songs about love inspired by observation rather than personal experience and how, despite recording every element herself at her home studio, it’s not a lockdown album.Scottish contemporary composer Erland Cooper's latest work, Carve the Runes Then Be Content With Silence, marks t…
 
Nick Hunt is a writer, journalist, and storyteller, and the author of Walking the Woods and the Water and Where the Wild Winds Are. In this essay, Nick ventures into the Forest of Dean, an ancient mixed woodland, where he searches for the unruly, twilight realm of the boar—a creature who brings him to the boundary between wildness and civilization,…
 
Lee is worried that one day soon her 25-year-old adopted daughter, who is pregnant and struggling with a drug addiction, will show up on her doorstep with a baby in tow. How will she be able to explain the situation to her other daughter, who’s only 6 years old? And how can she prepare her for the day she’ll confront drugs and alcohol herself? On t…
 
More than 70 percent of the 103 pre-Emancipation slave narratives acknowledged using waterways as their method for escaping enslavement. However, much of the scholarship on the Underground Railroad has centered on land routes. Sailing to Freedom: Maritime Dimensions of the Underground Railroad (University of Massachusetts Press, 2021) convincing as…
 
Notre-Dame of Amiens is one of the great Gothic cathedrals. Its construction began in 1220, and artistic production in the Gothic mode lasted well into the sixteenth century. In Notre-Dame of Amiens: Life of the Gothic Cathedral (Columbia UP, 2020), Stephen Murray invites readers to see the cathedral as more than just a thing of the past: it is a l…
 
A vivid ethnography of Egyptian migrants to the Arab Gulf states, Migrant Dreams: Egyptian Workers in the Gulf States (AU in Cairo Press, 2020) is about the imagination which migration thrives on, and the hopes and ambitions generated by the repeated experience of leaving and returning home. What kind of dreams for a good or better life drives labo…
 
In Duplex Regnum Christi: Christ's Twofold Kingdom in Reformed Theology (Brill, 2020), Jonathon D. Beeke surveys the development of thinking among early modern Reformed theologians about the relationship between religion and civil government. Taking cues from Calvin, but showing how the Reformed tradition variegates around his contribution, Beeke s…
 
If China’s Mao era is seen by many as a time of great upheaval and chaos, there are also people and places for whom things appear quite different. Writing from one such place in A Time of Lost Gods: Mediumship, Madness, and the Ghost after Mao (U California Press, 2020), Emily Ng foregrounds the perspective of a rural population in Henan province w…
 
Today we are talking with Becca Andrews, a journalist at Mother Jones, where she writes about reproductive rights and gender. The story we discuss is “When Choice is 221 Miles Away: The Nightmare of Getting an Abortion in the South” and its follow up. Becca’s debut work of nonfiction, No Choice, based on her Mother Jones cover story about the past,…
 
Heterosexuality is in crisis. Reports of sexual harassment, misconduct, and rape saturate the news in the era of #MeToo. Straight men and women spend thousands of dollars every day on relationship coaches, seduction boot camps, and couple’s therapy in a search for happiness. In The Tragedy of Heterosexuality (NYU Press, 2020), Jane Ward smartly exp…
 
What makes a woman 'bad' is commonly linked to certain 'qualities' or behaviours seen as morally or socially corrosive, dirty and disgusting. Bad Girls, Dirty Bodies: Sex, Performance and Safe Femininity (Bloomsbury, 2020) explores the social, sexual and political significance of women who are labelled bad or dirty. Through case studies (including …
 
Raven Bowen's Work, Money and Duality: Trading Sex As a Side-Hustle (Policy Press, 2021) is a rare and valuable exploration of work duality. It calls on practitioners, policymakers and researchers to recognise the experiences of sex workers and to address race, culture and sex work in the UK against the backdrop of Brexit. Based on extensive empiri…
 
This episode of the New Books in Economic and Business History is an interview with Dr. Shane Hamilton, Senior Lecturer in Management at The York Management School, University of York. There he teaches Strategy and Business Humanities. He is the author of Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy (Princeton, 2008) and he is associate…
 
This is not a book about Sir Winston Churchill. It is not principally about his politics, nor his rhetorical imagination, nor even about the man himself. Instead, it addresses the varied afterlives of the man and the persistent, deeply located compulsion to bring him back from the dead, capturing and explaining the significance of the various Churc…
 
In 1800 a Belfast linen merchant named Alexander Brown emigrated with his wife and eldest son to Baltimore. Today his family’s name lives on in the investment firm Brown Brothers Harriman, a company that has long played an outsized role in American history. As Zachary Karabell details in his book Inside Money: Brown Brothers Harriman and the Americ…
 
If opposite-gender partnerships remain the societal ideal, then why are so many straight couples miserable? Author Jane Ward has been studying this question for some time and outlines her ideas about the tragic effects of heteronormativity in her new book, The Tragedy of Heterosexuality (New York University Press, 2020). In our interview, we discus…
 
by Sarah Keartes • Your obnoxious neighbor or just a misunderstood, displaced seabird? This article is part of Birdopolis, a three-part series that explores the lives of birds that are, by accident or design, spending more time in urban environments. The other stories are “Honolulu: A Seabird’s Surprising Five Star Destination” and “The City, the S…
 
In the years leading up to the horrific Tulsa massacre of 1921, the Greenwood district was a thriving Black metropolis, a city within a city. Buoyed by money from Oklahoma’s oil boom, it was home to the original Cotton Club and to one of the first Black-owned daily newspapers in the United States, the Tulsa Star. The Star’s founder and editor was A…
 
Learn about a pregnant mummy; the three body problem; and why you should take off your shoes when you enter your house. A newly discovered pregnant mummy is raising questions about ancient Egyptian beliefs by Grant Currin Johnson, S. (2021, May 5). First-ever pregnant Egyptian mummy discovered. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/culture-rel…
 
“THE DOPPELGANGER OF PAULINE PICARD” and More Terrifying True Stories! #WeirdDarkness Please SHARE Weird Darkness with someone who loves paranormal stories, true crime, monsters, or unsolved mysteries like you do! Recommending the show to others helps make it possible for me to keep doing the show! IN THIS EPISODE: Dubbed "the Oddfather" for his pe…
 
In two days' time, the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester will open its doors to an audience for the first time in over a year. And the first show to be presented will be a one-woman gig musical, a debut play from actor Lauryn Redding, she talks to Nick about penning the songs and the script and playing all the characters in Bloody Elle.Writer an…
 
WEIRD DARKNESS RADIO SHOW: WEEKEND OF JUNE 18-20, 2021 Hear the show as it airs! Find out what stations and times you can listen to the broadcast by visiting the CALENDAR page at WeirdDarkness.com: https://weirddarkness.com/events. And please SHARE Weird Darkness with someone who loves paranormal stories, true crime, monsters, or unsolved mysteries…
 
The Milky Way may have grown up faster than astronomers suspected Most of the galaxy's disk was in place before a major collision 10 billion years ago Much of the Milky Way's characteristic disk (seen edge-on in this image from the Gaia spacecraft) was already in place 10 billion years ago, when an interloper galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus/Sausage co…
 
Record-breaking light has more than a quadrillion electron volts of energy Twelve gamma ray hot spots in space suggest our galaxy harbors powerful particle accelerators The LHAASO observatory (shown), in China, observes ultra high-energy light using detectors spread across a wide area that will eventually cover more than a square kilometer.…
 
A satellite's view of a deadly 2019 eruption could improve volcano monitoring The Whakaari, or White Island, volcano released telltale gases before erupting, data show The Whakaari, or White Island, volcano, seen here in 2011, is New Zealand's most active volcano.
 
Zombie' forest fires may become more common with climate change Wildfires that smolder underground in the winter can reemerge after warm summers A forest fire burns in the distance in Canada's Northwest Territories.
 
A newfound quasicrystal formed in the first atomic bomb test 'Trinitite' contains a material that is ordered but doesn't repeat itself Red trinitite (shown) was formed from melted sand, copper wires and other debris in the aftermath of the Trinity nuclear test.
 
Collapse may not always be inevitable for marine ice cliffs As a result, glacier retreat may not always be as quick as predicted, simulations suggest The collapse of ice cliffs into the sea (as might happen at Antarctica's Getz Ice Sheet, shown) won't necessarily lead to runaway breakup of the glacier upstream, new simulations suggest.…
 
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