show episodes
 
Ever wish you had more than just one week per year to skip town, go nuts, rock out, and yell “Spring break!” from the window of a moving vehicle? Damn right you do! Bobby Hazzard, The Colonel, and Stache(less) Anderson are three gentlemen who share your concerns. They know you’re gonna need some tunes and maybe directions to the party. Discussions about records, live bands, and good brews regularly run off the rails as they stay up late and make some beer disappear.
 
The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
 
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show series
 
Learn about whether parasites can turn us into zombies, why awkward silences are so awkward, and why bubbles form in boiling water. Could parasites turn us into zombies? By Cameron Duke Ahmed, I. (2019, November). The science of zombies: Will the undead rise? Phys.Org; Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2019-11-science-zombies-undead.html Blum, J., Sc…
 
Learn about how eclipses on Mars can tell scientists more about the planet’s interior, why we behave irrationally when our freedom is threatened, and how an ‘80s video game was at the center of a conspiracy theory. The Martian Moon Phobos Creates a Yearly Solar Eclipse — and Its Effects Could Tell Us More About the Planet by Grant Currin Surprise o…
 
Learn about how being a “Viking” was actually a career choice, not an ethnicity, why it’s easy to plant false memories, and how the pandemic has made birdsong more complex. "Viking" was a job description, not heredity by Grant Currin Helmets. (2020). National Museum of Denmark. https://en.natmus.dk/historical-knowledge/denmark/prehistoric-period-un…
 
Learn about why predators don’t hunt their prey into extinction, then discover the history of crossword puzzles from author Adrienne Raphel! Why Don’t Predators Hunt Their Prey Into Extinction? By Cameron Duke Dickman, C., Nimmo, D., Ritchie, E., & Doherty, T. (2019, May 14). Invasive predators are eating the world’s animals to extinction – and the…
 
Learn about what it would be like to travel through a wormhole, how the pumpkin became North America’s Halloween mascot, and how social isolation can fuel conspiracy theories. What Would It Be Like to Ride Through a Wormhole? By Ashley Hamer Lindley, D. (2005). The Birth of Wormholes. Physics, 15. https://physics.aps.org/story/v15/st11 ‌Nola Taylor…
 
Learn about why officials in Idaho once dropped beavers from parachutes, how your romantic partner might be influencing your goals (and vice versa), and test your podcast knowledge with this month’s Curiosity Challenge trivia game. Romantic Partners Influence Each Other's Goals by Kelsey Donk Romantic partners influence each other’s goals. (2020). …
 
Learn about the disturbing original plots of five beloved fairy tales, how the HALT method can help control your impulses, and why our ability to drink milk evolved way faster than we thought! Here Are the Disturbing and Gory Origins of 5 Beloved Fairy Tales by Stephanie Bucklin Grimm 021: Cinderella. (2011). Pitt.Edu. https://www.pitt.edu/~dash/gr…
 
Learn how superstitions can actually reduce anxiety, why rebooting can often fix computer problems, and why the first full dinosaur skeleton ever found is finally being studied 160 years later. How Superstitions Can Actually Reduce Anxiety by Reuben Westmaas Brooks, A. W., Schroeder, J., Risen, J. L., Gino, F., Galinsky, A. D., Norton, M. I., & Sch…
 
Learn about the likelihood that we all live in a computer simulation. Then, author Thomas Kostigen explains how geoengineering might help cool the planet and save the world. Two physicists calculated the likelihood that we live in a computer simulation by Grant Currin The Physics arXiv Blog. (2020, August 28). This Equation Calculates the Chances W…
 
Learn why the concept of zero is newer than you might think, how you can worry more productively, and why the Earth’s atmosphere might be rusting the moon. The Concept of Zero Is Newer Than You'd Expect by Reuben Westmaas Matson, J. (2009, August 21). The Origin of Zero. Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/history-of-zer…
 
Learn about how patient O became patient zero, what it takes for a species to evolve twice, and how pesky fruit flies keep getting into your garbage. Please nominate Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2020 Discover Pods Awards! It's free and only takes a minute. Thanks so much! https://awards.discoverpods.com/nominate/ It'…
 
Learn about how cold the last ice age was, why your body’s stress response can actually be healthy for you, and how to stop a jack-a-lantern from spoiling. Please nominate Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2020 Discover Pods Awards! It's free and only takes a minute. Thanks so much! https://awards.discoverpods.com/nominat…
 
Learn about why cancer is stranger than we think and how scientists have “teleported” the behavior of real fish into robot fish. Please nominate Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2020 Discover Pods Awards! It's free and only takes a minute. Thanks so much! https://awards.discoverpods.com/nominate/ Scientists "teleported" …
 
Learn about the impressive memories of goldfish. Plus, hear from Dr. Kat Arney about why an evolutionary perspective may be the key to fighting cancer. Please nominate Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2020 Discover Pods Awards! It's free and only takes a minute. Thanks so much! https://awards.discoverpods.com/nominate/ G…
 
Learn about three mythological creatures that were inspired by real fossils, how people prefer to root for winning individuals over teams, and how scientists have created interactive paper. Please nominate Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2020 Discover Pods Awards! It's free and only takes a minute. Thanks so much! https…
 
Learn about how your schedule might be hurting your health, why the mantis shrimp is able to punch so hard without hurting itself, and who invented the aluminum can. Your Schedule Might be Hurting Your Health — Here's What to Do About It by Reuben Westmaas Your schedule could be killing you. (2017). Popular Science. https://www.popsci.com/your-sche…
 
Learn about what your muscles go through when they get pulled, whether trees have heartbeats, and the real science behind the recovering alcoholics’ mantra “one day at a time.” What Happens When You Pull a Muscle? by Ashley Hamer Pietrangelo, A. (2019). Muscle Strains. Healthline; Healthline Media. https://www.healthline.com/health/strains#treatmen…
 
Cody Cassidy is back to talk about how soap was invented. You’ll also learn about a bias that makes people believe poor people have thicker skin, and how good anxiety can help you get things done. Good Anxiety Can Help You Get Things Done by Reuben Westmaas Must We Suffer to Succeed? | Journal of Individual Differences | Vol 38, No 2. (2017). Journ…
 
Learn about why we remember things in the opposite order as we see them and how spiders use atmospheric electricity to balloon through the air. You’ll also learn who actually ate the first oyster from author Cody Cassidy. You Remember in the Opposite Order as You See by Reuben Westmaas Human brain recalls visual features in reverse order than it de…
 
Learn how swapping bodies with our pals can alter the way we view ourselves, why California’s redwoods have been able to survive relentless wildfires, and the real reason there are colorful bumps on the sidewalk. (If this episode sounds familiar, congratulations! You got the episode that escaped a week ago. Oops! This one is cleaned up and ready fo…
 
Scientists renamed human genes because of Microsoft Excel by Grant Currin Vincent, J. (2020, August 6). Scientists rename human genes to stop Microsoft Excel from misreading them as dates. The Verge; The Verge. https://www.theverge.com/2020/8/6/21355674/human-genes-rename-microsoft-excel-misreading-dates Ziemann, M., Eren, Y., & El-Osta, A. (2016).…
 
Learn how the mathematical mistake of exponential growth bias makes people underestimate the spread of COVID-19, how crocodiles have survived since the dinosaurs, and how puns activate both sides of the brain. "Exponential growth bias" can make people underestimate COVID-19 by Steffie Drucker Robson, D. (2020). Exponential growth bias: The numerica…
 
Learn about how wildfires are powerful enough to create their own storms, how the invention of bags influenced human evolution, and how announcers with low voices can make products larger. Wildfires can create their own storms by Cameron Duke Specktor, B. (2017, December 12). What Are Pyrocumulus Clouds? California Fires Spawn Eerie Formations. Liv…
 
Learn about how rats might not have been all to blame for the bubonic plagues and why we’re more prone to mindlessly eat while we multitask. When It Comes to the Black Death, the Rats May Have Been Framed by Ashley Hamer History.com Editors. (2010, September 17). Black Death. HISTORY. https://www.history.com/topics/middle-ages/black-death Gill, V. …
 
Learn about whether animals can predict earthquakes, why younger folks experience déjà vu more often, and how software that helped us reach the moon was literally woven by hand. Can Animals Really Sense an Earthquake Coming? A New Study Says Yes by Grant Currin Pratik Pawar. (2020, July 22). Animals Sense Earthquakes Before They Happen. Can They He…
 
Learn about how children led their own research project into what they really think of adults, how painting eyes on cow butts could help solve a wildlife conservation problem, and whether it’s a good idea to rinse out your recycling. Children led a research project into what they really think of adults by Kelsey Donk Maynard, E., & Barton, S. (2020…
 
Learn about how a phenomenon called the third-person effect makes us think we’re too smart for advertising to work on us, why scientists used violinists to study how humans sync in a complex network, and why you can relieve pain by holding hands! The Third-Person Effect Is Why We All Think We’re Too Smart for Ad Campaigns by Anna Todd Davison, W. P…
 
Learn about how that dark sense of humor can mean a higher IQ, the origin of the word “orange,” and how the arctic produces “zombie fires.” A Dark Sense of Humor May Mean You Have a High IQ by Joanie Faletto Willinger, U., Hergovich, A., Schmoeger, M., Deckert, M., Stoettner, S., Bunda, I., Witting, A., Seidler, M., Moser, R., Kacena, S., Jaeckle, …
 
Learn whether smiling can actually make you feel happier and why it took John Harrison, a working-class clockmaker, to figure out longitude. It Took a Working-Class Clockmaker to Figure Out Longitude by Ashley Hamer Dr Helen Klus. (2017, October 26). Latitude and Longitude. The Star Garden. http://www.thestargarden.co.uk/Longitude.html ‌Longitude f…
 
Learn about how there are two types of empathy — and why we need both, why sturdy steel razors dull, and whether it’s possible to learn perfect pitch. There are two types of empathy, and we need both by Kelsey Donk Empathy Definition | What Is Empathy. (2020). Greater Good Magazine. UC Berkeley. https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/empathy/defini…
 
Learn about why everyone claims they’re awful at remembering names; how “hobo code” helped itinerant workers communicate in the 1900s; and whether you probably see yourself as more attractive than you really are. We all think our memories are above average, except for remembering names by Steffi Drucker Finally, One Area Where We Don’t Think We’re …
 
Learn about how a mutation that evolved to protect us against malaria actually makes us more prone to other diseases; and why astronauts are using old sailing technology (sextants) to navigate through space. Plus: a special update from Cody! A mutation that makes us prone to autoimmune diseases evolved to protect us from malaria by Cameron Duke Kha…
 
Learn about how the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the oldest texts in the world, was first translated not by a scientist, but by an engraver’s apprentice named George Smith; how horses lost their toes; and why sperm swim differently than scientists previously thought. Some Random Guy Stumbled Upon and Translated a Legendary Ancient Text by Reuben Westm…
 
Learn why fragrance-free is NOT the same as unscented, and how a cow named Cosmo was genetically edited so he’ll have more male offspring. There's a big difference between "unscented" and "fragrance free" by Kelsey Donk Schwarcz, J. (2017, July 21). What is the difference between “Unscented” and “Fragrance-free” products? Office for Science and Soc…
 
Learn about why short-term pleasures are important for your well-being; a Thorne-Żytkow Object, which is what astronomers call a star within a star; and how science identified the culprit for your smelly armpits: Staphylococcus hominis. Short-term pleasures contribute to well-being just as much as self-control by Kelsey Donk Hedonism leads to happi…
 
Learn why pregnancy cravings might be more cultural than biological; and why raindrops don’t damage delicate insect wings. Then, play along at home and test your podcast knowledge with this month’s Curiosity Challenge trivia game. Pregnancy cravings are more cultural than biological by Grant Currin Orloff, N. C., Flammer, A., Hartnett, J., Liquorma…
 
Author Bill Sullivan discusses the surprising ways your genes can influence aggressive and violent tendencies. Then, learn about how it’s possible that anglerfish can fuse to their mates; and box breathing, a Navy SEAL technique for reducing stress and staying calm. Additional resources from Bill Sullivan: Pick up “Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs,…
 
Learn about how frequent daydreaming may be killing your mood, why ancient Greek temples were purposely built on fault lines; and the invisible forces that make you do the things you do, with author Bill Sullivan. You Daydream Surprisingly Often, and It's Not Helping by Rachel Bertsche Bradt, S. (2010, November 11). Wandering mind not a happy mind.…
 
Learn about how people under stress can find a “new normal” surprisingly quickly, and why the Mercury 13 should have been the first women in space. Even under stress, our sense of normalcy bounces back surprisingly quickly by Kelsey Donk Sense of normalcy bounces back fast: New study. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020…
 
Learn about how blind people can describe what animals look like, how “Ring Around the Rosie” probably doesn’t reference the Plague, and why scientists used Cladosporium sphaerospermum, a radiosynthetic species of fungus, to build a radiation shield. Ring Around the Rosie probably doesn't reference the plague by Kelsey Donk Mikkelson, D. (2000, Nov…
 
Learn about the "shower-curtain effect," the mystery of why your shower curtain will randomly cling to you; whether masks affect our emotional development; and why humans perk up their ears. No One Knows Why the Shower Curtain Will Randomly Cling to You by Joanie Faletto Why Does the Shower Curtain Move Toward the Water? (2001, July 11). Scientific…
 
Learn about what to do when your pet is scared; and why the theory of endosymbiosis says you have microbes inside your cells. Then, stick around to meet Natalia Reagan: an anthropologist, primatologist, and comedian who will be filling Cody’s shoes while he’s on paternity leave. What to do when your pet is scared by Cameron Duke Waite, M. (2020, Ju…
 
Learn about how mapmakers catch copycats with paper towns and trap streets; why people on their deathbed can probably hear their loved ones pay their last respects; and that time some woodpeckers shut down NASA’s plan to launch the space shuttle Discovery. Paper Towns and Trap Streets Are How Mapmakers Catch Copycats by Reuben Westmaas Goblu and Be…
 
Physician James Hamblin, staff writer for The Atlantic, explains what would happen if you stopped showering — and other fun facts from the emerging science of the skin microbiome. Plus: are some trees really immortal? Are some trees immortal? A new study says no by Grant Currin Despite debate, even the world’s oldest trees are not immortal. (2020).…
 
Learn about how you can slash your exercise time with high-intensity interval training (HIIT) — and the science that backs it up; how “collective narcissism” can make groups toxic; and how dolphins make friends strategically. HIIT Is the Science-Backed Workout That Can Slash Your Exercise Time by Ashley Hamer Burgomaster, K. A., Howarth, K. R., Phi…
 
Learn about why it’s harder to clean grease off of plastic than glass; how zoos use their own version of dating apps for breeding programs; and why science says you don’t have to be married to be happy. Why is it harder to clean grease off of plastic than glass? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Lili) Saig, A. (2012, May 17). Why does soap ea…
 
Learn about why people prefer round numbers over precise ones, thanks to a principle behavioral economists call attribute framing; and whether there really are wasps inside figs. People prefer round numbers even when the precise number is better news by Kelsey Donk Consumers Prefer Round Numbers Even When the Specific Number Is Better News. (2016).…
 
Learn what environmental cardiology has taught us about how we should live, with help from Dr. Aruni Bhatnagar. Then, you’ll learn about the world’s first 3D-printed nuclear reactor core; and why spaghetti always breaks in three. Environmental cardiology resources from Dr. Aruni Bhatnagar: HealthDay. (2020). California’s Wildfires May Have Fueled C…
 
Environmental cardiology researcher Dr. Aruni Bhatnagar explains why experts are looking at our environment to improve our health. Then, learn how Polynesians and Native Americans connected across more than 2,000 miles of ocean — all the way back in the 12th century. Environmental cardiology resources from Dr. Aruni Bhatnagar: University of Louisvi…
 
Learn about why you have false memories of doing daily tasks; how we know that dogs might be able to sense Earth’s magnetic field via magnetoreception; and the science behind why there’s no up or down in space. Science confirms we create false memories of doing daily tasks by Steffie Drucker Paper: Mundane behavioral decisions, actions can be “misr…
 
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