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The History of Ancient Greece Podcast is a deep-dive into one of the most influential and fundamental civilization in world history. Hosted by philhellene Ryan Stitt, THOAG spans over two millennia. From the Bronze Age to the Archaic Period, from Classical Greece to the Hellenistic kingdoms, and finally to the Roman conquest, this podcast will tell the history of a fundamental civilization by bringing to life the fascinating stories of all the ancient sources and scholarly interpretations of ...
 
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Straddling the Strait of Kerch in the Northern Black Sea, the Bosporan Kingdom provides an unusual case study within the Hellenistic period. Originally settled by Greeks during the 6th century BC, the Cimmerian Bosporus would become host to a powerful kingdom backed up economically by its massive grain exports to the Mediterranean. For most of its …
 
In this episode, we discuss the years 409-406 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenians’ achieving control in the Hellespont and Bosporus, Alcibiades’ triumphant return to Athens, the ascension of Lysander and his bromance with Cyrus, the Athenian defeat at Notium and the disgrace of Alcibiades, Kallikratidas victory over Konon at Mytile…
 
From the folks over at Classical Wisdom! Classical Wisdom’s World-Wide Inaugural: SYMPOSIUM 2020 POWER & POLITICS WITH SPECIAL GUEST AUTHORS AND ACADEMICS Streaming Live | October 24-25, 2020 (starting 10am Saturday / starting 11am Sunday) This is your opportunity to join an exclusive online Symposium with some of the greatest thinkers on the ancie…
 
For the first episode of the A.D. History Podcast's second season, hosts Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote sit down with the host of The History of Ancient Greece Podcast (THOAG) Ryan Stitt; to discuss the relationship between Ancient Greece and Rome during the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire Period. Yet kicking off this episode, Patr…
 
In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Curtis Dozier, Assistant Professor of Greek and Roman Studies at Vassar College. He is the producer and host of The Mirror of Antiquity, a podcast featuring classical scholars discussing the intersections of their research, the contemporary world, and their own lives. More importantly to our discu…
 
Special Episode with Ryan Stitt of The History of Ancient Greece Podcast: The story continues in the 2nd and final part of this two part series on the relationship between Greece and the Near East prior to 500 BCE Fan of History Podcast Website: https://play.acast.com/s/history/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuIXoVRYAX2KyMBtqq7JGxQ Face…
 
Though they viewed themselves as the civilized center of the world, the Greeks had always expressed a curiosity for what lay on the periphery. The conquests of Alexander the Great had thrown open the doors of Asia and Africa, lands that were only the stuff of legend and hearsay, to hordes of Greek explorers, scientists, and diplomats. Many would be…
 
"In this episode of Amped Up Radio, I sit down to talk with Ryan Stitt, the creator and host of The History of Ancient Greece Podcast. Ryan talks about the thorny issue of historiography in ancient Greece, relating to the lack of reliable sources; what life would have been like if you were a male, female, or slave living in Athens, and Sparta's eug…
 
In today's special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Denise Eileen McCoskey, Professor of Classics and affiliate of Black World Studies at Miami (OH) University. She has written extensively on the politics of race and gender in antiquity and is currently at work on a project examining the role of eugenics in early twentieth-century classical scholar…
 
Special Episode with Ryan Stitt of The History of Ancient Greece Podcast: Relationship between the Greeks and the Near East prior to the Persian Invasions. There is not one record in all the tablets found in Nineveh regarding Greece… but surely there’s more to the story. Bernie and Ryan tell it in part 1 of 2 in this special series. Fan of History …
 
An off season, behind the scenes peek episode, featuring insights from the Working Over Time team, as well as two peers within the podcast/live stream heritage content community (Ryan Stitt of the History of Ancient Greece podcast and Natasha Billson of Behind the Trowel youtube channel). Working Over Time by Dr. Karen Bellinger Website: https://wo…
 
The world of the nomads who lived upon the Eurasian Steppe would face a radical transformation between the 4th-2nd centuries BC. Originally dominated by the Scythians and Saka, the Pontic-Caspian and Central Asian Steppes saw the migration and invasion of new tribes, sending them on a collision course with the likes of the Seleucid Empire and Greco…
 
"In preparation for Persia’s increased involvement with the Greek mainland, I think it’s a good idea to get some expert input on the “Yauna” on the western frontiers of the great empire. Please enjoy my conversation with the excellent Ryan Stitt of The History of Ancient Greece Podcast." The History of Persia Podcast Website: https://historyofpersi…
 
In this episode, we discuss the Second Greco-Punic War (410-406 BC), as hostilities in Sicily draw in Carthage and the Syracusan fleet away from the eastern Aegean and the Hellespont, including Hannibal Mago's first invasion of Sicily and the destruction of Selinus and Himera, the rebellion of Hermocrates, the rise of Dionysius as tyrant of Syracus…
 
With 49 episodes published, I decided to celebrate by making episode 50 a question and answer session, where I respond to topics fielded by listeners of the show. We dive into discussions on favorite history books, how to get into podcasting, and more historical topics like "who was the greatest of Alexander's Successors?" and "who would win in a w…
 
In this episode, we will be looking at two regions of Asia Minor and the Black Sea: the first is Galatia, home to the descendants of the Celtic tribes who marauded their way through Greece before being settled in central Anatolia, remaining an enclave of Celtic culture while serving as mercenaries (and foes) to the Hellenistic kingdoms. The second …
 
In this episode, we discuss the years 411-410 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the shifting of the naval war to the Hellespont, the vigor that the Athenian democracy showed in carrying on the war effort against Sparta and Pharnabazos with victories at Cynossema and Cyzicus, the re-establishment of the radical democracy at Athens, and the tran…
 
The conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire by Alexander the Great and his Successors did not spell the end of Iranian civilization. During the early Hellenistic period, several Iranian dynasties manage to establish themselves as independent rulers in their own right, propagating and transforming Iranian traditions and cultures in a changing envi…
 
Concluding our look at the philosophies of the Hellenistic Age, we take a round tour of three other important schools: the ascetic and often times crass Cynics, the hedonistic predecessors of the Epicureans known as the Cyrenaics, and the Peripatetics, the heirs of Aristotle and the Lyceum.Title Theme: Seikilos Epitapth with the Lyre of Apollo, pla…
 
In this special guest episode, Marc DeSantis and I discuss his most recent book, "A Naval History of the Peloponnesian War: Ships, Men and Money in the War at Sea, 431-404 BC". In particular, we talk about the ship designs, naval combat, the financial burden of navies, and the overall war strategies of both sides. Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryo…
 
Questions on the existence of true knowledge had plagued many Greek philosophers, but it was during the Hellenistic period when Skepticism, divided between two competing branches, emerged to openly cast doubt on the possibility of knowing anything at all. The disciples of Pyrrho of Elis, a contemporary of Alexander the Great, sought to achieve inne…
 
This episode features a presentation that Ben Jacobs (trained urban planner and host of the Wittenberg of Westphalia podcast) and Ryan Stitt (trained Ancient Greek and host of The History of Ancient Greece podcast) gave at Intelligent Speech 2020, a virtual conference for podcast producers and consumers. We discuss the form and function of cities i…
 
This episode features the Ancient History Panel at Intelligent Speech 2020, a virtual conference for podcast producers and consumers. Participants included Ryan Stitt (The History of Ancient Greece podcast), Jamie Redfern (The History Of: Alexander and The History Of: Hannibal podcasts), Dominic Perry (The History of Egypt podcast), and Jenny Willi…
 
From the super galleys of the Hellenistic monarchs to the engagements of Cape Ecnomus and Drepana during the First Punic War, the Hellenistic Age was the epoch of naval warfare in the ancient world. Joining us is nautical archaeologist and PhD student Stephen DeCasien to talk about the intricacies and evolution of the navy during the period, the pr…
 
In this episode, we discuss the years 411-410 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the third and final treaty between the Spartans and Tissaphernes; the comedic plays "Lysistrata" and "Thesmophorizusai" by Aristophanes; how the Athenians succumbed to civil war for the first time in nearly a century and saw an overthrow of their democracy by what …
 
With an Egyptologist’s perspective, PhD student Henry Bohun joins the show to help explore the complexities of the relationship between the Greco-Macedonian rulers of the Ptolemaic Dynasty with that of their native Egyptian subjects. Despite being Macedonian to the core, the Ptolemies nevertheless saw themselves as heirs and continuators of the Pha…
 
The legacy of Cleopatra, the last independent queen of Ptolemaic Egypt and arguably the most famous figure of the Hellenistic period, is not just limited to the works of William Shakespeare. Joining us today is Yentl Love, creator and writer of the website "The Queer Classicist", who talks about the reception of Cleopatra (Qalūbaṭrah) in the Islami…
 
Ryan Stitt - The History of Ancient Greece Podcast talks about his love of Greece and podcasting with Roifield Brown of Agora Podcast Network on the run-up to Intelligent Speech 2020. Video version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlyM6ZLncWM&t=30s Intelligent Speech 2020 will take place online on June 27th 10 am to 6 pm Eastern time. The theme of …
 
In this episode, we discuss the years 413-412 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenian response at home to the Sicilian Disaster, the Spartan and Theban devastation of Attic agriculture and commerce from Decelea, the dissolution of the "friendship" between Athens and Persia, the Spartans' building up of a navy and encouraging of revolts …
 
In this episode we are joined by historian and Cornell PhD student John McTavish to discuss the Wars of the Diadochi, where the Successors of Alexander the Great fought over a period of 40 years to carve apart his empire and found their own kingdoms, giving birth to the Hellenistic World as we know it. We discuss the problems of early Hellenistic s…
 
Arguably the most popular of the Hellenistic philosophies, the Stoic movement, with its emphasis on reason and self-control, attracted several famous figures such as the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, the Macedonian king Antigonus II Gonatas, and Seneca the Younger. Believing that wisdom is the highest good and can be achieved through philosophy, t…
 
In today's special guest episode, I am joined by director and screenwriter Esme von Hoffman (Festival of Cinema NYC 2019 Winner for Best Director) for her film, Ovid and the Art of Love. Esme and I discuss her background with Classics and Roman history, what drew her to make a film about the life of Ovid, her artistic vision in adapting the film to…
 
"Today we will be discussing Ryan's entrance into podcasting, a small segment of our military careers and how that has impacted podcasting, and how podcasting has fundamentally changed both of our lives." Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvauhHxX2jU&t=23s The Apex Podcast Website: https://theapexpodcast.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/…
 
Ryan Stitt is the host of The History of Ancient Greece Podcast, and he joins us today to separate fact from the fiction in the 2004 movie Alexander. Based on a True Story Podcast Website: https://www.basedonatruestorypodcast.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/basedonatruestorypodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/danlefeb…
 
A quick update on the release of show merchandise and on the upcoming Q&A (question and answer) session for episode 050.Hellenistic Age Podcast Show Merchandise:Etsy Page (https://www.etsy.com/shop/HellenisticAgePod)Bookmark (https://etsy.me/2WmQxHE)Episode 50 Q&A Contact (send in by or before episode 048):Email (hellenisticagepodcast@gmail.com)Con…
 
Named after the eponymous philosopher Epicurus (341 – 270 B.C.), the Epicurean school was one of the more popular if controversial doctrines to emerge during the Hellenistic period. Arguing that “Death is nothing” and denying the existence of the afterlife, Epicurus and his followers sought to explain the world through empirical observation and the…
 
In this special guest episode, Dr. Owen Rees and I discuss Ancient Greek land warfare in general with lengthy discussions on the definition of a hoplite, its socio-political importance, and the problems surrounding its chronology and historiographic tradition; the problems with the traditional reconstructive models of ancient Greek battles; the imp…
 
By 255 B.C., the Carthaginians were in dire straits, having faced the prospect of a Roman invasion of North Africa. However, the talented leadership of Xanthippus of Lacedaemonia and Hamilcar Barca managed to stave off defeat for another 15 years, but the unrelenting nature of the Romans in spite of military and natural disasters would bring an end…
 
Dr. Nikolaus Overtoom joins us to discuss the Parthians and the Arsacid dynasty, a group that emerged from the Central Asian Steppes to come into conflict with the Seleucids and Hellenistic kingdoms during early-middle 3rd century B.C. We talk about Dr. Overtoom's work regarding early Parthian history, the adaptability of a steppe society ruling ov…
 
The First Punic War, lasting from 264 to 241 B.C., was the longest uninterrupted war in the ancient world, fought between the Roman Republic and the Phoenician city-state of Carthage. Exploring the origins of the conflict is essential, tracing the earliest instances of Romano-Punic relations to the intervention of Rome on the behalf of the Mamertin…
 
In this episode, we discuss the year 413 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the rise of Archelaus to the Macedonian throne, the Spartan establishment of Decelea, the defeats by the Athenian army and navy at Syracuse, and the retreat and ultimate surrender of the Athenians, which brought the Sicilian Expedition to an end Show Notes: http://www.t…
 
Polybius of Megalopolis (~200 - 118 B.C.) was a Greek nobleman and high ranking member of the Achaean League, whose political career was prematurely ended when he was taken as a political hostage to Rome. Rather than disappearing into obscurity, Polybius took it upon himself to compose a "universal" history, so as to explain to his fellow Greeks ho…
 
The city-state of Carthage , founded by Phoenician settlers in modern Tunisia during the 9th century B.C., was a premier power of the western Mediterranean. Stretching their reach from North Africa into Spain, Sicily and Sardinia, the Carthaginians managed to establish a formidable economic empire thanks to their nautical prowess, eventually leadin…
 
Though initially a critical failure upon release, subsequent re-cuts of the 2004 "Alexander" film by director Oliver Stone has been more positively received, and it has been praised as one of the most historically accurate films to depict the ancient world thanks to the historical consultant Robin Lane Fox. In this loosely-structured episode, we ar…
 
In this episode, we discuss the years 415-414 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenian attempt at blockading Syracuse, the death of Lamachos, the tactical blunders of Nikias, the arrival of Gylippus, and the "Birds" of Aristophanes Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2020/02/100-sicilian-stalemate.html Intro by Neil Ecka…
 
In Greek Sicily, the rule of law was dominated by the tyrant, and no tyrant was more infamous than Agathocles (361 - 289 B.C.). For over three decades he ruled the city of Syracuse as both a tyrant and king, bringing it into a golden age. At the same time, Agathocles enacted political massacres and acts of brutality to ensure his control, and he wa…
 
By 272 B.C., the throne of Macedon now lay firmly in the hands of Antigonus II Gonatas. As a “philosoper-king”, the court of Pella would play host to a great amount of intellectual celebrities of the early Hellenistic period, and peace would return Macedon to a state of prosperity. The situation would be different in Greece, as stirrings of rebelli…
 
Antigonus II Gonatas, son and grandson of Demetrius I Poliorcetes and Antigonus I Monopthalmus, was not of the same military mold as his forebears, traditionally preferring the company of philosophers over the camp. However, it would be left to him to achieve the family dream of taking the throne of Macedon, all the while dealing with the likes of …
 
In this episode, we discuss the years 417-415 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the ostracism of Hyperbolus, the rivalry of Nikias and Alcibiades, the siege of Melos, the lead up and first year of the Sicilian Expedition, and the prosecutions for the Hermai and Eleusinian Mysteries scandals Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/…
 
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