The Rhetor News Podcast public
[search 0]
×
Best The Rhetor News Podcast podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best The Rhetor News Podcast podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
A quasi-daily podcast from Slate chronicling Donald Trump's rise to the presidency and his current administration. Journalists Virginia Heffernan and León Krauze talk to reporters, historians, psychiatrists, and other experts to help explain who this man is and why this is happening, right now, in the United States of America.
 
Amy Walter and Tamara Keith kick off the week with an in-depth discussion of the latest political news. Posted each Monday by 9 p.m., the Politics Monday podcast includes the full audio of every on-air segment. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full shows, individual segments, Shields and Brooks, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/fu ...
 
A weekly podcast about Christianity and leftist politics. The Magnificast is hosted by Dean Dettloff and Matt Bernico. Each week's episode focuses on a unique or under-realized aspect of territory between Christianity and politics that no one taught you about in sunday school.
 
The Carnegie-Tsinghua China in the World podcast is a series of conversations between Director Paul Haenle and Chinese and international experts on China’s foreign policy, China’s international role, and China’s relations with the world, brought to you from the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center located in Beijing, China.
 
I think the world would be a better place if China and America got along, and perhaps that begins with Chinese and Americans getting along better... I'm talking about are the cultural and value differences between "us" as Americans and them as those who were born and raised in Mainland China... I believe we all want to better understand China, but more importantly, we want China's integration with the West to lead to greater prosperity for all and not greater conflict that seems to be perpet ...
 
Jim and Mark use the insane ramblings of a tiny-handed narcissist to explain logical fallacies. Each episode we focus on a single logical fallacy and, using examples from Trump, UK politics and pop culture, explore how and why it fools people, how to avoid committing it yourself, and how to counter it in an argument. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/fallacious-trump/donations Want to advertise on this podcast? Go to https://redcircle.com/brands and sign up.
 
British politics is a of a nightmare to keep up with at the moment. Reading every think-piece or news story about how life is getting objectively worse would be enough to make your eyes fall out. That's why we created The British Dream, a podcast that pumps analysis of how everything is ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ directly into your ears. Stay positive.
 
Defense Matters is a podcast series on various national defense and foreign affairs topics produced by the National Defense University Foundation Inc. The National Defense University Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization with the mission of raising awareness and funds in support of the mission and scholarship of the National Defense University.
 
Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. Each episode of Ipse Dixit features a different guest discussing their scholarship. The podcast also features several special series. "From the Archives" consists historical recordings potentially of interest to legal scholars and lawyers. "The Homicide Squad" consists of investigations of the true stories behind different murder ballads, as well as examples of how different musicians have interpreted the song over time. "The Day Antitrust Died?" ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
In this episode, Daxton R. "Chip" Stewart, Professor of Journalism in the Bob Schieffer College of Communications at Texas Christian University, discusses his new book, "Media Law Through Science Fiction: Do Androids Dream of Electric Free Speech?," which is published by Routledge. Stewart begins by describing how he became interested in studying t…
 
Is it really true that “every picture tells a story”? Storytelling is part of Joseph’s method, whether he’s creating city scenes or public sculpture or children’s illustrations. So how does the story an author may have in mind affect the viewer, and is this different for different types of art? Joseph, who works in Las Vegas, does online streaming …
 
The idea of a “Deep State” or a “Swamp” within the federal bureaucracy is not one that started with President Donald Trump's entrance into politics, but he has brought it to the forefront of the conversation like no one before him. His characterization of government employees, while not specific, could have a lasting impact on the way citizens view…
 
In this episode, Guadalupe Luna, Professor Emerita at the Northern Illinois University College of Law, discusses her article "This Land Belongs to Me: Chicanas, Land Grant Adjudication, and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo," which was published in the Harvard Latino Law Review. Luna begins by describing the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and what it wa…
 
NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Amna Nawaz to discuss the latest political news, including President Trump's commutation of Roger Stone's prison sentence and the Lincoln Project's TV ad response, Trump's attacks on U.S. health experts during the pandemic and what poll numbers in states struggling with COVID-19 co…
 
Continuing on the Rhetoric (ca. 335 BCE) book 1, ch. 1-6 and book 2, ch. 1-5, 18-24. We finish up with enthymemes (rhetorical arguments), maxims, and signs. We then move to emotions, where we chiefly talk about anger: Is it always a matter of status injury, or is frustration equally (or more) foundational? Begin with part one, or get the unbroken, …
 
The worldwide coronavirus pandemic has spread around the United States for months, with little signs of abating. The public health crisis has been marred by ineffective messaging, resource shortages and a fractured response by the federal government. Dr. Barry Eichengreen is a Professor of Economics and Political Science at the University of Califo…
 
French Revolution began 150 years of chaos, war, bloodshed, revolution…. Each movement being eaten by the next… France in the 1789 had LOTS of problems: high tax on poor, Rich, oppression etc. CLEARLY in need of Revolution. America had just gone through their own revolution. But the ideal of these two revolutions were VERY different. In America, th…
 
Since early 2019, the Trump administration has been trying to fold the Office of Personnel Management into the General Services Administration. But, according to an investigation by the Project on Government Oversight, the head of the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, told senior administration lawyers that it would be illegal to carry …
 
Though it does not dominate the national conversation, police reform has not left the minds of activists and protestors. In cities and states across the United States, many are working to reorient the way law enforcement is done. Route Fifty’s Emma Coleman has a story on police reform and the ways communities are replacing police with social worker…
 
There are six traits of totalitarian cults: 1) Control of the environment 2) A system of rewards and punishments 3) Creating a sense of powerlessness 4) Fear and dependency 5) Reforming the follower’s behavior and attitudes 6) Closed system of logic. These were described by Margaret Singer’s Cults in Our Midst (1996). In 1952, Asch wrote: ‘The grea…
 
The United States and its close allies Saudi Arabia and Israel have been bombing and occupying large sections of the so-called “Muslim world” for decades – drastically ramping up after the 9/11 attacks and seemingly with no end in sight. The U.S., like all empires, cannot operate a large, complex system premised on violence, meddling and subjugatio…
 
Jonathan Freedland and Kate Proctor look at what Rishi Sunak announced in the summer statement. Rajeev Syal speaks to Sir Peter Soulsby, the mayor of Leicester, about what the government got wrong with the city’s local lockdown. Plus, the Spectator’s Kate Andrews and Labour peer Stewart Wood discuss the politics of a second wave. Help support our i…
 
The coronavirus pandemic continues to ravage the United States, with communities all over the country struggling to contain the COVID-19 crisis. But, as our guests today note in a post recently published on GovExec.com, pandemics are not a new phenomenon to the Native American communities in the U.S. Lindsey Schneider is Assistant Professor of Nati…
 
Brian, Erica, Mark, and Seth from The Partially Examined Life interrogate the 10-part ESPN documentary on Michael Jordan's Bulls' six championships. Was it worth ten hours? Does its time-jumping structure work? Is it really hagiography, or is the vision of ultra-competitiveness repulsive? Why are sports amenable to creating cultural icons? Does the…
 
In this episode, Raymond H. Brescia, Hon. Harold R. Tyler Chair in Law and Technology and Professor of Law at Albany Law School, discusses his book "The Future of Change: How Technology Shapes Social Revolutions," which is published by Cornell University Press. Brescia begins by talking about his own background as a community organizer and how it h…
 
NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including President Trump's inflammatory rhetoric on race and American history, what polls say about how effective he is on these issues and why he's not talking more about the coronavirus pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - …
 
On the Rhetoric (ca. 335 BCE) book 1, ch. 1–6 and book 2, ch. 1–5, 18–24. What role does persuasion play in philosophy? Aristotle (contra Plato) argues it can and should be used for good: in law courts, political debates, public speeches. He describes the arguments forms used in rhetoric ("enthymemes") and analyzes the emotions that an audience mig…
 
While the coronavirus pandemic is not abating in many parts of the United States, much of the country is moving back toward something near normal. For many people, that means seeing coworkers in person for the first time since March and for others, it means some very uncomfortable conversations. Asha Tarry is an author, an award-winning community m…
 
In the fifty-third episode we explore the Appeal to the Law, starting with Trump and Giuliani claiming that paying off Stormy Daniels and colluding with Russia were both fine because there's no law against it. Then we heard Louie Gohmert using a child's excuse for disrupting a Congressional hearing. In Mark's British Politics Corner we look at Domi…
 
In this episode, I break down some of my thoughts from a previous episode with Dr Egnor (E153). If you see a group movement or state that denies the individual's though, variety of opinion, agency and replaces it with group identity, social constructionism, and uses fear based terror based tactics such as cancel culture, intimidation, isolation, an…
 
In this episode, Dr. Robert M. Farley, Senior Lecturer at the University of Kentucky Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, discusses his new book, "Patents for Power: Intellectual Property Law and the Diffusion of Military Technology," which he co-authored with Davida H. Isaacs, and is published by the University of Chicago Pres…
 
Over the past few weeks, we've seen activists tear down statues of confederate statues, that's pretty cool. But, they've also torn down a statue of a saint, is that cool? It is! In this episode, Matt and Dean talk about the current discourse around statues, Saints, Benjamin's philosophy of history and Marika Rose's Theology of Failure. Intro Music …
 
In this episode, Emily Croucher (@emilydotgov), Pilar Escontrias (@XicanaRebelde), Efrain Hudnell (@EfrainJoshua1), and Donna Saadati-Soto (@SaadatiSoto), discuss their involvement with United for Diploma Privilege and its successes to date. They explain why diploma privilege is critical to safety and fairness, as we face the Covid-19 pandemic. The…
 
The coronavirus pandemic has seen upticks in recent weeks, with the case number shooting past 2.5 million cases in June. As more states vacillate between opening up and moving forward in the CDC reopening phases, governments need to make decisions on how to test for and, perhaps, track the disease. Martin O’Malley was governor of the state of Maryl…
 
In this Trumpcast Plus preview, Virginia Heffernan talks to Mary Jordan, Pulitzer Prize-winning national correspondent for the Washington Post and author of The Art of Her Deal, about Melania Trump—getting to the mystery of who she was before she met Donald Trump, her education, the way she manufactures her image, where she fails as a FLOTUS, and t…
 
Jonathan Freedland and Sonia Sodha break down a chock-a-block week for the government and opposition. Patrick Wintour explains the latest spat in the Commonwealth, and local councillors David Williams and James Lewis discuss council finance pressures post-Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod…
 
President Donald Trump on Friday signed an executive order to overhaul requirements federal agencies use when evaluating potential hires. The order emphasizes, according to the White House, skills over academic qualifications. The move is one the White House has touted as part of its commitment to modernizing the government workforce and its commit…
 
NPR's Tamara Keith and Errin Haines of The 19th join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the implications of the racist video President Trump recently shared, the U.S. debate over wearing masks and what it says about politicization of the pandemic and how Trump's coronavirus response could shape his support among voters. P…
 
Al works for Logically, a company that fights misinformation. He joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to try to discuss the appeal of conspiracy theories, whether their fandom is like other fandoms, the relation between pernicious and fun theories, and theories that end up true. We touch on echo chambers, the role of irony and humor in spreading these theo…
 
Continuing on Sontag's essays “On Style” (1965) and "The Death of Tragedy” (1963). Mark, Wes, Seth and Dylan keep talking about the appropriate distance to retain (or not) to a work of art, which is supposed to be relevant to moral action in the world. We also spell out how this is relevant to our recent episodes on tragedy. Start with Part One or …
 
The current moment is one of upheaval and it is an unprecedented time in history. Government and organizational leaders need to be a force for change and leadership during this unprecedented moment. Nina Kern is a Manager in Grant Thornton Public Sector’s organizational transformation practice and co-leads GT’s OCM Community of Practice. She wrote …
 
How can we take responsibility for the pain in our lives and not pass that pain on? Our words have the potential to release us from the perpetual pain of traumatic experiences. In the second part of my conversation with Dr. James Pennebaker, we discuss healthy ways individuals can process traumatic experiences and the power of expressive writing. D…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2020 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login