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Best Thomas V Mirus podcasts we could find (updated August 2020)
Best Thomas V Mirus podcasts we could find
Updated August 2020
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He was the greatest rhetorician in the Latin-speaking world. Born in North Africa, Lactantius was summoned to serve at the imperial court. He converted to Christianity and, with the persecution of Diocletian, lost his job and lived in poverty. He continued writing to strengthen the faithful. With the rise of Constantine and the legalization of Chri…
 
This episode revisits some great moments from past Catholic Culture Podcast episodes: 18 - Acedia, the Forgotten Capital Sin - R.J. Snell https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/episode-18-acedia-forgotten-capital-sin-rj-snell/ 19 - Understanding the Church's Abuse Crisis - Fr. Roger Landry https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/episode-19-u…
 
In this episode originally from Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast, Thomas asks attorney and scholar Louis Karlin whether Robert Bolt’s play and film A Man for All Seasons accurately depict St. Thomas More’s views on the rights of conscience, and his motives for martyrdom. More’s involvement in the prosecution of heretics is also examined: even if…
 
“All the aspirations which the prayer of other religions expresses are fulfilled in the reality of Christianity beyond all measure.” This ecclesial document was written in 1989 by the then-Prefect for the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Cardinal Ratzinger, who would later become Pope Benedict XVI. Ratzinger was responding to a surge of …
 
Something a little different: this is the audio from a video on the DeClue's Views YouTube channel, which I am republishing here because I want to give these men a wider audience. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeQenCC8iQo Description: In a recent video,Taylor Marshall presented what he considers to be errors in the documents of the Second Vatican…
 
“In accordance with the view of the apostle Paul, let us give attention to the text - that we can, as he himself says, receive ‘the mind of Christ’ and know ‘the things that are given us by God.’” Origen of Alexandria could be considered the most titanic intellectual figure of the first three centuries of Christianity after St. Paul.In the breadth …
 
The Catholic Church in America has largely lost its distinctive flavor and with it, its ability either to retain the faithful or to evangelize the infidel. The problem precedes Vatican II: in the Tridentine 1950s, many Catholics, eager for mainstream respectability, had already adopted a bourgeois spirituality. In his first book, The Prodigal Churc…
 
It’s hard to be an intelligent Christian without somehow handling Origen’s ideas. He set the ground rules for scientific study of the Bible. He wrote foundational works in spirituality, apologetics, and fundamental theology. In this episode, we look at those big accomplishments, but also examine the ideas that got him into trouble. Do souls exist b…
 
July 24, 2020 is being observed by the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America as a day of mourning for Hagia Sophia, in response to the decision by Turkey’s President to convert the historic cathedral in Istanbul from a museum to a mosque. In a message to the Greek Orthodox faithful, Archbishop Elpidiphoros wrote, “knowing that on Friday, July 24th,…
 
From 1981 to 1993, Jane Greer edited Plains Poetry Journal, publishing poets who were reviving the traditional tools of “rhyme, meter, alliteration, assonance, painstaking attention to diction” which had been abandoned in favor of free verse. (These poets included names you will be familiar with from the Catholic scene today, such as Anthony Esolen…
 
“Whoever, then, appears in his own opinion to have comprehended the Sacred Scriptures, or even some part of them, yet does not build up with that knowledge the two-fold love of God and his neighbor, has not yet known as he ought to know.” “Everything which is not exhausted by being given away is not yet owned as it ought to be.” This episode marks …
 
Origen of Alexandria was one of the most important figures in Christian antiquity—most brilliant and most productive—yet also one of the most complicated. He was widely influential and widely despised. He was praised for his accomplishments and blamed for disasters. He wrote thousands of books and invented several academic disciplines, including sc…
 
Modernity treats the human body pretty much as a machine for the production of pleasure. It is tuned up, fueled, and oiled for peak performance, and then when it is no longer of use, it is burnt and disposed of in a maximally efficient manner. Paradoxically, the denial of a soul which persists after bodily death has led us to deny the body itself a…
 
This episode marks Catholic Culture Audiobooks’ 50th audiobook release - so who better to hear from than our patron saint, St. John Henry Newman? And to celebrate this milestone accomplishment, what better topic than that of “the danger of accomplishments”? In this sermon, Newman warns of the danger of separating feeling from acting. Let it not be …
 
This is the second half of an interview with G.C. Dilsaver on his book The Three Marks of Manhood: How to be Priest, Prophet and King of Your Family. Dr. Dilsaver discusses how the Christian husband and father must wield three staves: the scepter of authority, the crosier of co-episcopacy, and the cross of redemption. This last is most important, a…
 
"But the fight for our planet, physical and spiritual, a fight of cosmic proportions, is not a vague matter of the future; it has already started." Russian novelist Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn gave this commencement address at Harvard University on June 8, 1978. Almost line by line, Solzhenitsyn’s observations are prophetic. Especially in light of curre…
 
He was a believer for little more than a decade, but in that time he managed to set one of the pre-eminent examples of Christian leadership. Before his conversion, Cyprian had lived the Carthaginian dream. He was wealthy and successful, but miserable and maybe addicted to drink and other pleasures. With his baptism came a transformation. Within a y…
 
“Mistrust Him, Meg, I will not, even if I feel myself faint." This is the third in a series of podcast episodes in honor of St. Thomas More's feast day on June 22nd (see our discussion of the classic film, A Man for All Seasons, along with an interview with More scholar Louis Karlin, on Criteria: the Catholic Film Podcast). In this episode, we pres…
 
There is a great need for Catholics to acknowledge the timeless Biblical and Magisterial teachings about the headship of fathers over their families. Yet St. Paul’s simultaneous call for husbands to love their wives as Christ loves the Church - that is, to the point of death - is sometimes treated as an addendum when in fact it is the very essence …
 
“Because of something uncertain, there should not be a definite abandonment of duty — for, in that event, there is certain ruin for the people, not only in things pertaining to this life, but also in those of that other life which must be cared for with incomparably greater attention and anxiety.” In his Letter to Honoratus, Augustine writes in res…
 
After much popular demand, Thomas pays tribute to legendary Catholic sci-fi writer Gene Wolfe, who passed away last year. Though not known to the general public, Wolfe is a sci-fi author’s sci-fi author—a number of his contemporaries considered him not only the best in the genre, but in American fiction at the time (Ursula Le Guin said “Wolfe is ou…
 
He started as a papal critic, became history's first antipope, and today is honored — with the pope he rejected — as a saint whose feast day is universal. Go figure. Hippolytus of Rome is one of the great curiosities of early Christian history. In ancient times he was known for his encyclopedic books of theology, which became standard reference wor…
 
"The man who thinks that he is quiet and peaceful has within him a passion that he does not see." St. Dorotheus was a 6th century Palestinian abbot who founded a monastery near Gaza. Excerpts of his instruction on self-accusation are found in the Office of Readings, and are particularly relevant in the wake of the violence and tension set off by th…
 
Catholic actor Jonathan Roumie plays Jesus in The Chosen, the first multi-season TV series about the life of our Lord. He joins the podcast to discuss his approach to playing the God-Man, the spiritual impact of the series, its groundbreaking approach to funding and distribution—and his devotion to the Divine Mercy. Contents [1:10] The unique produ…
 
“Love gives life to the soul, for just as the body lives through the soul, so the soul lives through God, and God dwells in us through love.” Happy Pentecost! We celebrate on the podcast with this Pentecost sermon by St. Thomas Aquinas. Article on Aquinas' preaching style: "What Lessons Do Thomas Aquinas' Sermons Hold For Modern Preachers?" https:/…
 
Alexandria, in Egypt, was the intellectual capital of the Greco-Roman world, and as the second century turned to the third it emerged as an influential center of Christian thought. Its first impression was spectacular — and it all came from a teacher named Clement. He was a seeker after truth, and had traveled the Mediterranean to study under the g…
 
"Let the working man and the employer make free agreements, and in particular let them agree freely as to the wages; nevertheless, there underlies a dictate of natural justice more imperious and ancient than any bargain between man and man, namely, that wages ought not to be insufficient to support a frugal and well-behaved wage-earner." The second…
 
It has become fashionable in traditionalist circles to blame all problems in modern theology on the so-called nouvelle théologie, including a range of thinkers such as Henri de Lubac, Karl Rahner, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Hans Küng and Josef Ratzinger. But this is based on a number of misconceptions: about the nature of the nouvelle théologie itself…
 
“Hence, it is clear that the main tenet of socialism — community of goods — must be utterly rejected, since it only injures those whom it would seem meant to benefit, is directly contrary to the natural rights of mankind, and would introduce confusion and disorder into the commonweal.” Rerum Novarum—literally meaning “Of New Things,” but more accur…
 
Perpetua of Carthage is almost unique in the literature of her time. She is a woman and a writer. Over the course of centuries, traditional Greco-Roman culture produced very few female writers. Nor did ancient literature bother much with the particular concerns of women. So Perpetua stands out as a witness to women’s experience in the third century…
 
“When the Master himself has explicitly said of the bread, ‘This is my body,’ will anyone still dare to doubt? When He is Himself our warranty, saying, “This is my blood,” who will ever waver and say it is not His Blood?” During Lent, we heard the first two of St. Cyril’s Catechetical Lectures – now we jump ahead to his final two, Lectures 23 and 2…
 
Modern education treats the child as a blank slate, a malleable object to be formed according to the will of whoever has power over educational policy. Classical Christian education treats the child as a person made in the image of God, a mystery to be held in awe, and tends to the flowering of his already-given nature by leading him to wisdom and …
 
“Do not lose heart, children, for as the Lord has been angry, so will He heal again and the Church shall quickly recover her own good order and shall shine as she has shone.” We’ve finally arrived at the conclusion of our six-part series of the great Catholic classic, Life of St. Anthony. If you’ll recall, we began this work all the way back in Jan…
 
Happy feast of St. Joseph the Worker! In this episode, we honor St. Joseph with a brief Holy Saturday poem by Sr. Mary Ada, OSJ. St. Joseph, Protector of Holy Church—pray for us! Go to http://www.catholicculture.org/getaudio to register for FREE access to the full archive of audiobooks beyond the most recent 15 episodes. Theme music: 2 Part Inventi…
 
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