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It's easy to talk about what's wrong in Baltimore. The challenge is to talk about what's next. In each episode, Wes looks at innovative ideas that are working in other cities, places like Cincinnati, St Louis, and Detroit. And he asks the question: Can those ideas work for Baltimore? This program is made possible by Genine and Josh Fidler, and supported by the Baltimore Community Foundation, created by and for the people of Greater Baltimore, where many donors join together to make the regio ...
 
Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR's Morning Edition. We'll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, WYPR reporters and other journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you?d like to hear, email us at ontherecord ...
 
Since 2002, "Your Maryland" hosted by Ric Cottom, has presented little-known human interest stories from Maryland's past. Beginning with accused witches and the murderous career of John Dandy in the earliest days of the colony, through Morgan State's fabled "Ten Bears" in the 1970's, the show covers nearly four centuries of heroes, scoundrels, floods, fires, riots, plots, athletes (two-and four-legged), beautiful spies, brilliant writers, misunderstood pirates, and ghosts. All of that color, ...
 
Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall and his guests are talking about what's on your mind, and what matters most to Marylander's, the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine. We welcome your questions and comments. E-mail us at midday@wypr.org
 
Sports at Large is a weekly exploration of the issues and people who play and watch sports. SaL goes behind the headlines and stats to find the how and why, and the ways in which sports intersect with and influence our daily lives. SaL features interviews and commentaries from professionals and fans a like to tell a more complete story. One person described it as "a thinking fan's guide to sports."
 
The Noir and Bizarre explores the dark and strange stories we tell ourselves about human existence - occult history, ghosts, haunted houses, and secret crimes - with a special emphasis on stories that draw on the rich history and culture of Baltimore. Additionally, the show philosophically asks big questions about spiritual narratives and rituals surrounding life and death.
 
Truth and Reconciliation is a forum for the people of Baltimore to discuss the challenges of law enforcement reform, alternative paths to improving communal safety, and how to hold power accountable.Through personal tales of triumph and tragedy, Truth and Reconciliation seeks new perspectives on how to improve the lives of the people of the city through activism, analysis, and actionable ideas.Hosted by Taya Graham, Sean Yoes, and Stephen Janis
 
What follows is a counter to the narrative about the people of Baltimore. It's the story of Turnaround Tuesday -- the jobs movement for and with Baltimore's residents who have been excluded from earning a living, years after incarceration. It's the story of change hidden beneath the headlines about our city. It's a story of Baltimore that only Baltimore can tell. And we intend to tell it like it is. Higher Purpose is a 4 episode audio-documentary series written, produced, and narrated by Yas ...
 
Life in the Balance is a monthly program that asks: What are the systemic issues in Baltimore that keep marginalized people from reaching their full potential, and what are the solutions to those problems?Each episode is rooted in an individual's story about overcoming a personal hurdle related to one of these systemic issues. It might be homelessness, drug abuse, or a post-incarceration employment struggle. This narrative engages the listener throughout the program as concerned stakeho ...
 
Program host Greg Tucker regularly engages Catherine Collinson, the Transamerica Institute’s founding president who also leads Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® TCRS (a foremost expert on the state of retirement readiness in America), and Hector De La Torre, who leads the The Transamerica Center for Health StudiesSM TCHS, on the broad range of issues related to financial literacy, retirement, and health and wellness.
 
Catherine Collinson, the Transamerica Institute's founding president who also leads Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® TCRS (a foremost expert on the state of retirement readiness in America), and Hector De La Torre, who leads the The Transamerica Center for Health StudiesSM TCHS, discuss the broad range of issues related to financial literacy, retirement, and health and wellness.
 
Questions are raised when an out-of-town businessman comes to Baltimore offering bold promises. Kahan Dhillon, a young Sikh, Indian-American real estate developer from Fairfax County, mysteriously shows up in Baltimore touting a $10 billion citywide redevelopment plan. Although he represents himself as a civic leader and savior for a city in need of change, something seems awry. Is Kahan Dhillon a legitimate developer looking to do good for Charm City? Or is the city of Baltimore being explo ...
 
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show series
 
The House of Delegates approved and sent to the Senate Thursday a bill that would cut the governor out of the parole process for inmates serving life terms. It’s a step that was more than 25 years in the making, ever since then Gov. Parris Glendenning famously said in 1995, that “life means life” and turned down every parole request for inmates sen…
 
The annual number of homicides in Baltimore surpassed 300 for each year from 2015 to 2020. Young people have been at the forefront of the city’s violence. On this month’s episode of Future City, a rebroadcast from 2019, we discuss violence in Baltimore, how it affects young people in particular, and efforts to end cycles of retaliatory homicide thr…
 
It’s Midday with the Mayor, another in our series of live conversations with the Mayor of Baltimore, Brandon M. Scott. Among the topics Tom and the Mayor discuss: The mass vaccination site at M&T Bank Stadium has been open for a week. When Governor Larry Hogan made comments about Baltimore getting more vaccines than it is entitled to, the reaction …
 
Last December, Martha Jones, a historian at Johns Hopkins University, described in a Washington Post oped how her research had revealed that Johns Hopkins, the namesake of her institution, had owned slaves. Long thought to be an abolitionist, Mr. Hopkins, in fact, claimed at least four men as his property in 1850, and prior to that, had used Black …
 
Baltimore City is moving to correct a long established problem: slow responses to calls to its 311 system. A council committee held a hearing Wednesday with officials from the non-emergency line and the city agencies that respond to requests for service. “A heap of debris is in an alley and 10 to 30 days pass after calling it in, a 311 operator tel…
 
Developers are proposing to build a high-speed, magnetic levitation train line between Baltimore and Washington. The $13 billion Maglev project is designed to cut the hour-long train trip to a mere 15 minutes, with trains travelling at more than 300 miles an hour. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
The Maryland Senate gave final approval to a package of police reforms yesterday, including a bill to repeal and replace the Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights -- which lays out due process procedures for police accused of misconduct. Maryland Matters reporter Hannah Gaskill talks about years of previous attempts by lawmakers to tackle repeal…
 
The leaders of Maryland’s two largest predominantly Black jurisdictions -- Baltimore City and Prince George’s County -- demanded a more equitable distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine at a joint hearing Wednesday. Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott said the state has fundamentally ignored the barriers Black and Brown communities face getting the vaccine,…
 
Thursday marks a year since Maryland hospitals first started receiving COVID-19 patients. Since March 4, 2020, hospitals have treated more than 34,000 Marylanders for COVID. Bob Atlas, president of the Maryland Hospital Association (MHA), says the state’s hospitals have been pulling through but they have a long road ahead of them.…
 
Members of the Baltimore City Council have asked Mayor Brandon Scott to either remove homeowners from the city’s upcoming tax sale list or postpone the sale altogether, as the financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic continues to hit Baltimoreans. “We should not be subjecting families to losing their homes during this COVID-19 crisis,” said Cou…
 
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a bill that would take the governor out of the parole process for inmates serving life terms. The bill, sponsored by Del. Luke Clippinger, a Baltimore Democrat, would increase from 15 to 20 years the time inmates sentenced to life must serve before they are eligible for parole while remo…
 
Tom's guest today is the American author, George Saunders. He’s published hundreds of short stories, and his first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, won the prestigious Man Booker Prize in 2017. Saunders’ short stories have been published in The New Yorker, Harper’s and many other magazines, and collected in best-selling books like The Tenth of December…
 
Gov. Larry Hogan has brought on Dr. Robert Redfield, head of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the Trump administration, as a senior adviser for public health. Hogan said in a news conference Tuesday he has always emphasized the importance of following science and getting the best advice from medical experts. He said Mar…
 
The General Assembly is again this year taking up legislation that would make Maryland a sanctuary state. The controversial bill, which is scheduled for a hearing Wednesday before the House Judiciary Committee, is designed to protect undocumented immigrants from being reported to federal immigration authorities after interactions with police. The l…
 
The pandemic is distributing its financial effects, like its health damages, chaotically. They’re colliding on people who never before reached out for mental-health support but are now seeking help. Sherri Bloom is clinical director of the nonprofit Pro Bono Counseling Project, which is hearing from more callers and getting referrals from the 211 U…
 
Mays Chapel Elementary School art teacher Meaghan O’Reilly is filling her shopping bag at the Exchangeree on THE AVENUE at White Marsh. She is getting some basic supplies, but she needs more than usual. “I have these materials in my classroom,” O’Reilly said. “But being that we are really not able to share materials very easily, if a student forget…
 
Today on Midday, an update from the General Assembly in Annapolis with one of the leaders of the Republican caucus in the House of Delegates. Tom's guest is Delegate Kathy Szeliga. She’s the Minority Whip who represents District 7, including parts of Baltimore and Harford Counties. Delegate Szeliga and Minority Leader Nic Kipke have headed the Hous…
 
Continuing today's focus on the 2021 Maryland General Assembly at the midpoint of its 90-day legislative session, Tom's next guest is Ovetta Wiggins, who covers the Annapolis State House and Maryland politics for The Washington Post. She discusses the key legislative developments of the 2021 session thus far, including efforts to advance progressiv…
 
With another COVID-19 vaccine deployed, the end of the pandemic may be in sight. But millions of people who were infected continue to battle lasting complications. Hopkins epidemiologist Priya Duggal tells of a new survey collecting data about COVID symptoms and of genetic research into why some people are vulnerable to long COVID. Check out the Jo…
 
It’s the Midday Healthwatch with Dr. Leana Wen. Johnson and Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine, which is being manufactured here in Baltimore, has been approved for emergency use by the US Food and Drug Administration, adding an important weapon in the fight against the coronavirus. Unlike the vaccines made by Pfizer and Moderna, the J&J drug requires only…
 
Each year Open Society Institute-Baltimore awards grants to highly motivated community leaders. We hear from two recipients about their work. First, Ateira Griffin leads BOND - Building Our Nation’s Daughters - which brings single moms and daughters together for activities to build their confidence and their connection. Then, Wayne Paige graduated …
 
Local medical executive and baseball fan Dr. David Mayer has finished his yearlong walk across America, visiting many of the country’s Major League Ballparks on the way. He made the journey to raise awareness of preventable medical harm to patients and caregivers, the nation’s third leading cause of death.…
 
The House of Delegates approved on nearly a party line vote Friday a bill that extends tax breaks to low-income immigrants despite the objections of Republicans who warned it would benefit those without legal status in the United States. The bill expands the state’s existing Earned Income Tax Credit so that low-income residents who file taxes with …
 
A package of eight bills that aim to reform policing were considered for the first time by the full Maryland Senate Friday. Included in the package are bills making police misconduct records subject to the Maryland Public Information Act; requiring the use of body-worn cameras; limiting no-knock warrants; creating new rules around the use of lethal…
 
Former President Donald Trump has been voted out of the White House and removed from Twitter, which has considerably reduced his presence in the public psyche. That is about to change. On Sunday afternoon, he will give the culminating speech at CPAC, the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida, and he will do so as a still-domi…
 
The state rollout of the Covid-19 vaccine has been slow, chaotic and frustrating. But even with the glitches … nearly 800-thousand Marylanders have managed to secure a slot and get vaccinated. What does immunity offer … and how maddening is it for those still waiting? We talk with Dr. Neda Frayha, Dr. Zackary Berger, Gregory Terry, Renee Wilson, Sa…
 
When coronavirus restrictions in Baltimore City change with fluctuating COVID-19 data, no single person at Joe Squared decides how the pizzeria will respond. Instead, 13 worker-owners put their heads together and vote on operational status. The Station North staple, once owned by Joe Edwardsen, is now a worker cooperative. After closing in the spri…
 
A bill extending a major poverty-fighting tool to low-income immigrants cleared an initial vote in the Maryland House of Delegates Thursday, despite Republicans’ objections to extending the benefit to immigrants without legal status in the United States. The legislation expands the state’s existing Earned Income Tax Credit so that low-income reside…
 
Tom Hall's guest for the hour today is the president of the Baltimore City Council, Nick Mosby. He leads a progressive council at a perilous time for our city, as we confront a public health crisis, an economic downturn, and a continued epidemic of serious and deadly crimes. President Mosby has been a vocal critic of Governor Larry Hogan, accusing …
 
Exactly one week after his inauguration, President Joe Biden issued an executive order promising to tackle climate change. He set a goal of making all electricity generation in the U.S. free of carbon dioxide pollution by the year 2035. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.By WYPR Baltimore
 
Eighty days into his tenure as Baltimore City’s mayor, Brandon Scott wrestles with some of the city’s enduring challenges, and some newer ones. We ask about the police consent decree, his multi-pronged struggle against gun violence, what help he expects from the Biden-Harris administration, and what is on the mind of so many citizens -- the city’s …
 
City Councilman Kristerfer Burnett wants strict controls on the use by Baltimore City of facial recognition surveillance, a technology that privacy advocates say holds harmful implications for people of color. He has authored a bill that would prohibit its use by non-police city agencies and set strict standards for use by the police department. “M…
 
On today's Midday, a conversation with the award-winning author and ethicist, Harriet A. Washington, about the human costs of unethical medical research. In the current national debate about vaccine hesitancy among people in communities of color, people point to distrust of medical research that is premised on the experience in two famous cases: on…
 
Retailers and consumers are navigating a challenge: looking ahead to buying and selling post-pandemic while keeping commerce alive now. The Baltimore Downtown Partnership is focused on both, with BOOST, which stands for 'Black-Owned and Occupied Storefront Tenancy.' It pairs Black-owned businesses with vacant storefronts and wraparound services lik…
 
Last night, President Biden addressed the nation as we passed the grim milestone of 500,000 deaths from illness related to COVID 19. A candle lighting ceremony at the White House commemorated the loved ones who have been lost. Flags will fly at half-mast for the next five days. Because of the pandemic, most of the deceased were denied the honor of …
 
As President Biden noted in his national address last night, we are struggling to comprehend the incomprehensible – that half a million of our fellow Americans – and another two million more people around the globe -- have lost their lives to the COVID-19 virus over the short span of a year. We have also lost, in many cases, the traditional ways of…
 
In his new book, “We Own This City,” Baltimore Sun crime reporter Justin Fenton unwinds a twisted tale of dirty cops, oblivious leaders, and a community betrayed by those sworn to protect it. Fenton unearths the rotten roots of the Gun Trace Task Force, an elite plainclothes police unit that won praise for its arrest rate, all while skimming from d…
 
Tom's next guest is Cara Ober, the founder, editor-in-chief and publisher of BMoreArt, an online and biannual print journal devoted to the local art scene. She joins us on Zoom. Ms. Ober, who is also an artist and curator, was one of eight 2019 recipients of the Maine-based Rabkin Foundation Arts Writer Award, the largest grant of its kind, given a…
 
Tom's Newsmaker guest today is Baltimore City's Inspector-General, Isabel Mercedes Cumming. She was appointed in 2018. Since then, her office, which was established as an oversight authority to investigate allegations of misconduct by City employees and contractors, has grown from four to 17 employees, and the number of complaints received on the O…
 
n anthology of Black American history...verses about the life of 18th-century poet Phillis Wheatley...short stories about girlhood in the South. These are some of the new must-read picks Carla Du Pree of CityLit Project offers us. She also previews next month’s virtual festival. And local history teacher Dante Brizill shares the unsung story of Afr…
 
Tom's guest is the award-winning author Chang-rae Lee. He is the author of six novels. His first, Native Speaker, earned the 1996 Hemingway Foundation/Pen Award for First Fiction. The Surrendered, which he published in 2008, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A subsequent novel, On Such a Full Sea, was a finalist for the National Book Critics C…
 
What goes into the decision to, literally, put someone on a pedestal? A new podcast called ‘Who Deserves a Monument’ follows a class from City Neighbors High School in their exercise to define what makes someone monument-worthy and who that person should be for Baltimore City. Podcast creator Sarah Lohnes, tells about the colorful and accomplished …
 
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