show episodes
 
Hey Now! Hey Now! is the popular nostalgia podcast where two childhood friends discuss their favourite childhood movies. In each episode longtime BFFs, Emily Sandford and Barney Leigh choose a 90s or 00s classic that modern-day millennials can HARD relate to. Now THAT is What Dreams Are Made Of! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Instantly Dated uncovers the stories behind your memories of 70s, 80s and 90s retro nostalgia, including B-movies 70s and 80s sci-fi TV, 70s, 80s and 90s technology, 70s and 80s toys, retro video games old commercials, the drive-in, video stores, VHS, Betamax, laserdiscs, CEDs and more.
 
This podcast is dedicated to self-growth, emotional well-being, and becoming the best versions of ourselves possible! You will find everything to do with personal development and self-help with topics ranging from anxiety relief, cultivating joy, conscious living, motivation, psychology, emotional intelligence and more! It's never too late to make positive changes. Let's make life extraordinary!
 
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show series
 
For the conclusion of our 9/11 trilogy, Justin Rogers-Cooper and I watch Alfonso Cuarón's 2006 cinematic masterpiece Children of Men, a work that has moved and obsessed both of us for years. We reflect on how the film uncannily captures the alternative future 9/11 launched us into — a world in which the apocalyptic background is getting closer and …
 
We are delighted to announce that our nostalgic gift card & wrapping paper collection is officially LIVE! You can browse the full range, in collaboration with Zoe Spry here: https://www.zoespry.com/copy-of-greetings-cards Hurry! The Julie Andrews one is selling out in Genovia 💕🍐😉 *Sigh* Ok, fine. ATTENTION, ALL FAIRYTALE THINGS and podcast listener…
 
For Part Two of our 9/11 trilogy, Justin Rogers-Cooper helps us untangle the world of 9/11 truthers and related conspiracy theories, as we explore how the attacks and their aftermath destabilized consensus reality and led us into a new landscape of weaponized digital information. This conversation covers a lot of territory, from Alex Jones to Burn …
 
MUSIC PSYCHOLOGY - USING MUSIC THERAPY TO IMPROVE MENTAL HEALTH, WELLNESS, SELF-AWARENESS & TO HELP US THROUGH DIFFICULT TIMES - In today's episode, we discuss the psychological benefits of using our favorite music as a form of self therapy, and how to use music to improve our mood, self--understanding, life satisfaction, and overall mental health.…
 
To mark the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, Justin Rogers-Cooper joins us for a trilogy of episodes considering the event’s legacy and long-term impact. In Part One, we consider the immediate shock of the day and how it seemed to instantly give birth to a new historical era, examining how Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11 and Jon Stewart’s sapp…
 
Bertrand Cooper joins us to discuss his latest incendiary piece in Current Affairs, “Who Actually Gets to Create Black Pop Culture?,” which argues that the elite class composition of many Black creators reveals deep contradictions in the politics of woke Hollywood. Listen to the whole episode: patreon.com/posts/episode-288-we-w-55434030…
 
Jenni Olson is a historian, archivist, and experimental filmmaker whose two feature-length films The Joy of Life (2005) and The Royal Road (2015) combine dreamlike urban landscapes, the dark history of California, and deeply personal reflections on queer love and desire. In this conversation, we talk about the origins of her aesthetic and the parti…
 
In 1975 a right-wing loon purchased 300 acres of swampland outside Cape Canaveral with the dream of building a theme park recreating the experience of a US Special Forces barracks in a rural Vietnamese hamlet at the height of the war. Visitors could take turns firing a machine gun at real Vietnamese refugees play-acting as Viet Cong, while replica …
 
On Episode 6 of NAM-TV, we cover events in 1964 and 1965, as American involvement in Vietnam finally made the move from distant meddling into a full-blown military invasion. We trace a direct line from Lyndon Johnson’s disturbing sociopathic fantasies and stunning political cynicism to the sickening acceleration of violence unleashed in late 1964, …
 
Who are “the people”? Erik Baker joins us to discuss his latest piece in n+1, a review of Thomas Frank’s 2020 book The People, No: A Brief History of Anti-Populism. Baker takes on Frank’s New Deal nostalgia and romantic vision of a monolithic, left-leaning American working class, a set of distorted perspectives that still hold weight for a signific…
 
Full episode: patreon.com/nostalgiatrap. Kyle Riismandel returns to the Trap to discuss the abysmal HBO documentary Woodstock ‘99: Peace, Love, and Rage, a film that, despite its shortcomings, gives us plenty to chew on about a weird era in American cultural politics. From Alanis Morrissette to Kid Rock, from Girls Gone Wild to Monica Lewinsky, we …
 
Today's episode discusses the psychology behind why we tend to romanticize the past so much and long for the way things were, and offers strategies for how we can finally let go and move forward in our lives. It talks about "rosy retrospection" , which is a psychological phenomenon in which we tend to judge the past disproportionately more positive…
 
What do Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, and the rest of the gang have to tell us about the staggering loneliness at the heart of the American experience? Blake Scott Ball is a professor of history at Huntingdon College and the author of Charlie Brown’s America: The Popular Politics of Peanuts. In this conversation, we trace the history of Charles Schu…
 
Kyle Riismandel, author of Neighborhood of Fear: The Suburban Crisis in American Culture, 1975-2001, returns to talk about the idea of generations, both as useful historical dividers and as complicated, constructed cultural identities. Are you Gen X? Boomer? Millennial? Zoomer? Does any of this shit matter? In this conversation, we reflect on what …
 
This episode discusses a cognitive distortion in psychology called "splitting", which is often referred to as "black and white thinking" or "all or nothing thinking". We can think of it as the failure in our thinking to bring together the dichotomy of both positive and negative qualities of the self and others into a cohesive, realistic whole. It i…
 
On Episode 5, we take a look at the period 1956-1963, when the United States attempted to create an anti-communist state called South Vietnam, with a well-connected Catholic-Confucian politician named Ngo Dinh Diem as its president. When JFK takes over in 1961, Diem's violent repression of the Vietnamese population accelerates, and a homegrown resi…
 
Elizabeth Becker is an award-winning author and journalist; her latest book, You Don’t Belong Here: How Three Women Rewrote the Story of War (2021), profiles three journalists whose groundbreaking work rearranged the history of the Vietnam War. In this conversation, Becker explains how Kate Webb, Catherine Leroy, and Frances Fitzgerald each develop…
 
*Strums Fender* We are "whelmed" to say that today’s season finale covers 10 Things I Hate About You. We burn, we pine, we perish for this 90’s movie, and are so glad you guys requested it. Shakespeare is smiling in his grave right now (and probably has a bratwurst hard on*) at the thought of us discussing Heath Ledger singing Frankie Valli and Jos…
 
Donald Borenstein is a freelance video director, editor, and one of my favorite online friends, whose posts on politics, culture, and media have been a highlight of my feed for years. This week we finally get to meet face to face (on Zoom) and talk about two of our respective favorite films, Lizzie Borden’s Born in Flames (1983) and Slava Tsukerman…
 
After a player died from being hit by a pitch in 1920, Major League Baseball banned the "spitball." But it allowed 17 players whose careers were determined to be dependent on it to continue throwing it. A century later, baseball is still dealing with what it now calls the "foreign substances" issue. The physics and history of baseball's dirtiest pi…
 
On this week’s episode we explore the world of CIA spookery unleashed in Vietnam as the French exited the region and the United States began escalating its involvement in Vietnamese affairs. From the gangster-style machinations of the Dulles brothers to the psychological warfare practiced by characters like Edward Lansdale and Dr. Tom Dooley, this …
 
The kids are crazy for Columbo! This week our friend Bill Black drops by to talk about the long-running detective show starring Peter Falk that’s seen an unlikely resurgence in the COVID era. From its weird class dynamics and parade of villainous guest stars to Falk’s truly iconic performance, we explore what makes Columbo’s stories, characters, an…
 
Allan Cooper is a professor of political science at North Carolina Central University. He joins us to discuss his latest book, Africa and the Global System of Capital Accumulation, which describes the strategic role Africa plays in the global capitalist economy, where exploitation of labor and resources sustains the world’s middle class and consoli…
 
17 years later, and we’re still waiting for Sidarthur’s comeback tour, and for someone to sell Coca-Cola necklaces on Etsy. In today’s episode we’re discussing a movie that ROCKS! - Lindsay Lohan’s ‘Confessions Of A Teenage Drama Queen’. So light some prayer candles, put on your I love NY tee, and for god sake - don’t get so distracted listening yo…
 
In the late Sixties through the Seventies, John Brisker was widely known as the meanest, toughest man in professional basketball. After winning ABA titles in Pittsburgh and punching his way through a few tumultuous seasons with the Supersonics of the NBA, John Brisker visited Africa, came back to the US, told his friends he was off to Africa again,…
 
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