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Sidedoor

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Sidedoor

Smithsonian Institution

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More than 154 million treasures fill the Smithsonian’s vaults. But where the public’s view ends, Sidedoor begins. With the help of biologists, artists, historians, archaeologists, zookeepers and astrophysicists, host Lizzie Peabody sneaks listeners through the Smithsonian’s side door, telling stories that can’t be heard anywhere else. Check out si.edu/sidedoor and follow @SidedoorPod for more info.
 
Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.
 
Season Four is Here. Welcome to The Detroit History Podcast. In our fourth season, we’ll explore The Scene, which had an outsized impact on Motor City culture as the signature show on Detroit’s only African-American owned television station; explore the construction of the Detroit-Windsor tunnel 90 years ago; study the life of a 19th century Michigan lumber baron as we look for ghosts in The Whitney restaurant. And we’ll tell you about the Nike Missiles that were stationed around metro Detro ...
 
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Black History Matters 365

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Black History Matters 365

BHM365 is a weekly podcast series hosted by Jo Scaife a Marketplace Entrepreneur

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BHM365 is a weekly podcast series that explores the true account of African American History as American History. Hosted by author and marketplace entrepreneur Jo Anne Scaife, this podcast dives into the revolutionary research found in “Black History 365: An Inclusive Account of American History” a seminal work by Dr. Walter Milton, Jr. and Dr. Joel Freeman. Featuring weekly interviews with history makers and current influencers, special ‘round table’ talks and series, as well as community f ...
 
A podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics by Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne. A weird and deep conversation about language delivered right to your ears the third Thursday of every month. "Joyously nerdy" –Buzzfeed. Listened to all the episodes here and wish there were more? Want to talk with other people who are enthusiastic about linguistics? Get bonus episodes and access to our Discord community at www.patreon.com/lingthusiasm Shownotes and transcripts: www.lingthusiasm.com
 
OUR COMMON GROUND with Janice Graham ALTERNATIVE ∞ ACTIVIST ∞ PROGRESSIVE ∞ EMPOWERMENT TALK RADIO “Speaking Truth to Power and Ourselves” XX//^\\XXXX//^\\XX “Transforming Truth to POWER, ONE Broadcast At A Time” XX//^\\XXXX//^\\XX OUR COMMON GROUND explores and examines history and culture, the socio-economic and political issues and conditions of Black people in America. Discussion with our community, “speaking Black truths” toward the best of our collective interests. We present the best ...
 
Culinary historian Linda Pelaccio takes a journey through the history of food. Take a dive into food cultures through history, from ancient Mesopotamia and imperial China to the grazing tables and deli counters of today. Tune in as Linda, along with a guest list of culinary chroniclers and enthusiasts, explores the lively links between food cultures of the present and past.
 
"This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture" is a weekly podcast produced by the Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU) an interracial group of faculty at Monmouth University concerned about issues pertaining to the Black/African American experience. BADFU members will periodically interview scholars, authors, activists, and community leaders on matters related to the history, society, and culture of Black and African American communities in the United States (U.S.) and beyond ...
 
The Blackbelt Voices podcast tells stories from and about Black folks down South that honor our history, celebrate our culture, and shape our future. Through first-person narratives and in-depth conversations, hosts Adena J. White, Kara Wilkins, and Katrina Dupins share the experiences of Black Southerners living in, loving, and reconciling with the region we call home. Music: Prentice Dupins Jr. Logo Design: Kara Darling Creative
 
John Brown Today is a podcast devoted to historical and contemporary themes relating to the abolitionist John Brown (1800-59), the controversial antislavery and antiracist freedom fighter. John Brown Today is hosted by Louis A. DeCaro Jr., a Brown biographer and researcher, the most prolific author on the John Brown theme since the abolitionist's death in 1859. John Brown Today engages a range of themes from history and biography to popular culture and other contemporary themes.
 
Join our musical journey as Meet The Music explores the hundreds of musical genres from A Cappella to Zydeco. Listeners gain insights into familiar and unfamiliar musical genres. In each episode, we share in-depth conversations on a variety of topics with influencers, insiders, music critics, and music artists about a particular genre.
 
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Historically Black

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Historically Black

APM Reports & The Washington Post

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Objects hold history. They're evocative of stories stamped in time. As part of The Washington Post's coverage of the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History and Culture, people submitted dozens of objects that make up their own lived experiences of black history, creating a "people's museum" of personal objects, family photos and more. The Historically Black podcast brings those objects and their stories to life through interviews, archival sound and music. The Washingt ...
 
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Nearly Numinous

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Nearly Numinous

CFRC.ca Podcast Network

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The Nearly Numinous podcast seeks to blend the academic study of religion with real world experiences of religion, community, the supernatural, and spirituality. Tune in to hear discussions about religious history, deep dives into pop culture (such as Star Trek or sports fandoms), and spooky discussions on vampires and other supernatural mythology. We’ll be interviewing academics, various practitioners, and more!
 
Welcome to The Mid-South Bugalu Podcast! A podcast that serves as an educational, creative, informative, and intellectual space for African-Americans and Latinos (Hispanic-Americans, Latinx) alike! This is an effort to encourage unity, peace, knowledge, and creativity, in the spirit of Latin-Boogaloo, a crossover music genre from the 1960's era in New York. I wanted to make a safe space for African-Americans and Latinos, two groups that I'm a part of; my father being African-American from Br ...
 
A weekly discussion from a group of African American staff members of On Comics Ground talking about Black Nerd Culture. From its history, its characters in comics, video games, and more, to his complexities and more series notes. Starring: Aaron Jones, Jasmine Brown, James Portis, Travis Tucker, and Marcus Freeman. Theme song created by Dvvmfvc in partnership with Shoot The Breeze Media.
 
TheGrio is the first video-centric news community site devoted to providing African Americans with stories and perspectives that appeal to them but are underrepresented in existing national news outlets. TheGrio features aggregated and original video packages, news articles, and blogs on topics from breaking news, politics, health, business, and entertainment. TheGrio is brought to you through the cooperation of NBC News and the production team that brought you the documentary film, Meeting ...
 
The African American Folklorist produces and published multimedia content about traditions, traditional beliefs, the cultural context, geographical locations, music, and vernaculars of African Americans and the role each element plays in the lives of the people past and present. We include interviews with and articles from musicians, historians, ethnographers, Community Scholars, and academics who specialize in and are enthusiastic about the Black Experience in America. Support this podcast: ...
 
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2100

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2100

Bantucola.com

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Welcome to the 2100 podcast! An ideological anchor, allowing accelerated growth of the African Diaspora in the C O L A… We're here to equip Black Pensacola with a mindset of group economics, a love for academics, and a healthy respect of our history, health, and God.
 
Name 3 Songs was created to challenge sexism in the music industry and empower fangirls. Every Sunday, join us as we think critically and unlearn internalized misogyny together. Co-hosts Sara Feigin and Jenna Million are long-time fangirls with 10+ years of music industry experience. For detailed show notes on each episodes visit: name3songs.com This is a music commentary podcast based on in-depth research and the personal opinions of the hosts.
 
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Skeleton Keys

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Skeleton Keys

Torri Yates-Orr, John Bucher

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SKELETON KEYS is a podcast dedicated to unlocking the mysteries of mythology and history in pop culture. Each episode is a skeleton key to unlock a particular artist, film, comic or other popular art through myth and history. Hosts, Torri Yates-Orr is an African American Historian and John Bucher is a Mythologist. Together, they take a look at the people, places, and events happening in culture in order to mine out a deeper meaning, having a ton of fun along the way.
 
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Melanin And Power

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Melanin And Power

MelaninAndPower Radio Network

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Our Network is dedicated to spreading the truth, culture, and history of the Melanated Family. Denouncing false truths, white supremacy, and all forms of oppression. We serve to uplift and improve the condition of the neglected and unheard. Join us today and be the difference that you want to see.
 
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The Brownprint

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The Brownprint

Gallery Media Group Originals

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Veteran broadcast journalist Cari Champion speaks with a diverse list of guests from every industry. A roster of successful individuals ranging from entertainers and athletes to business executives and journalists in an effort to discuss the state of progress in America. These conversations range from the inspirational to the uncomfortable, and this podcast will act as a mentorship to those in need of direction. Our goal is to engage in dialogue that will offer solutions and guidance on how ...
 
Noble Sissle, who lived from 1889 to 1975, participated in and witnessed some of America's great moments in history associated with culture and racial equality. Known throughout history as a music lyricist and orchestra leader, Sissle was an ambassador of goodwill for America from World War I with the renowned Harlem Hellfighters' Regimental Band to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s to entertaining millions of military service persons with the USO in World War II to playing for presidents, ...
 
From CFL America Radio, sports journalist Scott Adamson, along with fellow enthusiast and armchair historian Greg James, take a hot read with guests on the history, remembrances, culture, lore, legends and meaning of pro football around the world. Every few weeks the pair will sit down with authors who, through their books, have given all of us a close up look and perspective at the game we have grown up with and enjoy no matter where on the map we may call home, be it in Tokyo cheering for ...
 
Historic Black settlements in Nova Scotia tell a long-neglected story and through studying them we can unlock invaluable, under-represented knowledge. On a journey of rediscovery, Shawn Smith and Laurice Downey present Loyalist Connections: Est. 1783. They are determined to shed light on these lost and disappearing communities, discuss why these communities could not survive or are fading, and what these collapses tell us about the historic and modern systemic racism Black Nova Scotians face ...
 
Meet BlackFacts.com, the Internet's longest running Black History Encyclopedia - Delivering Black History, Culture, Vides and News to our followers. This podcast series provides your daily Black Facts Of The Day™. In addition there will be occasion bonus episodes focused on diversity or other key topics of interest to our BlackFacts audience Learn black history, Teach black history - https://blackfacts.com
 
On the Shoulders of Giants is dedicated to bringing awareness to the worldwide contributions of the heroes and cultures of the African Diaspora, both of which have given the world hope and freedom. The purpose is to provide an alternative and positive perspective of the history of the African diaspora, which challenges the negative rhetoric that is commonly told of non-white persons throughout the world. Our past is significant because of the plight we have had to overcome and in some aspect ...
 
The National Museum of African American History and Culture’s (NMAAHC) Civil Rights History Project, created by an act of Congress in 2009, is a joint effort of the Library of Congress and NMAAHC to collect video and audio recordings of personal histories and testimonials of individuals—many who are unheralded—who participated in the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s.
 
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Exploring the relationship between gender and events, Doing Gender in Events: Feminist Perspectives in Critical Event Studies (Routledge, 2021) delivers an ethnographic analysis of the celebration of gender equality in the context of the culture-led event. Drawing upon Critical Event Studies, Anthropology of the Festive, and Gender Studies, it prov…
 
Antony Best's British Engagement with Japan, 1854-1922: The Origins and Course of an Unlikely Alliance (Routledge, 2020) reconsiders the circumstances which led to the unlikely alliance of 1902 to 1922 between Britain, the leading world power of the day and Japan, an Asian, non-European nation which had only recently emerged from self-imposed isola…
 
Listen to this interview of Aliyah Kovner, science writer and also host of the podcast A Day in the Half-Life. We talk about who science communication reaches: peers, other experts, non-experts, you, me, everyone. Aliyah Kovner : "That's definitely a thing not talked about enough, that is: often the audience for science communication is the scienti…
 
Serhii Plokhy’s The Frontline: Essays on Ukraine’s Past and Present (Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, 2021) includes discussions that focus on the major milestones of the history of Ukraine, ranging from the first ancient mentionings of the territory to the recent Russian military aggression against Ukraine. The book offers a concise and compr…
 
Through the unique lens of “Indigenized environmental justice,” Indigenous researcher and activist Dina Gilio-Whitaker explores the fraught history of treaty violations, struggles for food and water security, and protection of sacred sites, while highlighting the important leadership of Indigenous women in this centuries-long struggle. As Long As G…
 
Infertility Comics and Graphic Medicine (Routledge, 2021) examines women’s graphic memoirs on infertility, foregrounding the complex interrelationship between women’s life writing, infertility studies, and graphic medicine. Through a scholarly examination of the artists’ use of visual-verbal codes of the comics medium in narrating their physical or…
 
Marking the third centenary of the office of Prime Minister, The Impossible Office?: The History of the British Prime Minister (Cambridge UP, 2021) tells its extraordinary story, explaining how and why it has endured longer than any other democratic political office in world history. Sir Anthony Seldon, historian of Number 10 Downing Street, explor…
 
Both a symbol of the Mubarak government’s power and a component in its construction of national identity, football served as fertile ground for Egyptians to confront the regime’s overthrow during the 2011 revolution. With the help of the state, appreciation for football in Egypt peaked in the late 2000s. Yet after Mubarak fell, fans questioned thei…
 
Following the Treaty of Versailles, European nation-states were faced with the challenge of instilling national loyalty in their new borderlands, in which fellow citizens often differed dramatically from one another along religious, linguistic, cultural, or ethnic lines. Peripheries at the Centre: Borderland Schooling in Interwar Europe (Berghahn B…
 
Is it possible that the consensus around what caused the 2008 Great Recession is almost entirely wrong? It's happened before. Just as Milton Friedman and Anna Schwartz led the economics community in the 1960s to reevaluate its view of what caused the Great Depression, the same may be happening now to our understanding of the first economic crisis o…
 
When English colonizers landed in New England in 1630, they constructed a godly commonwealth according to precepts gleaned from Scripture. For these 'Puritan' Christians, religion both provided the center and defined the margins of existence. While some Puritans were called to exercise power as magistrates and ministers, and many more as husbands a…
 
In this ambitious book, Max Siollun provides an overview of Nigerian history from 1472 to the 1950s. As such, What Britain Did to Nigeria: A Short History of Conquest and Rule (Hurst, 2021) provides an excellent primer for those interested in learning about the gradual process of colonial conquest and the attendant resistance by local populations, …
 
The Sports History Network is a proud partner of Plaay Classic - a sports simulation board game company. WIN A FREE PLAAY CLASSIC BOARD GAME This podcast is sponsored by PLAAY Classic Sports Simulation Board Games! Spelled with TWO "A's" P-L-A-A-Y... Realistic board game re-creations of professional football, hockey, baseball, NASCAR, golf and more…
 
Christine Schwöbel-Patel's Marketing Global Justice: The Political Economy of International Criminal Law (Cambridge UP, 2021) is a critical study of efforts to 'sell' global justice. The book offers a new reading of the rise of international criminal law as the dominant institutional expression of global justice, linking it to the rise of branding.…
 
In La Guera Rodriguez: The Life and Legends of a Mexican Independence Heroine (U California Press, 2021), Silvia Marina Arrom traces the legends of María Ignacia Rodríguez de Velasco y Osorio Barba (1778–1850), known by the nickname "La Güera Rodríguez." Seeking to disentangle the woman from the myth, Arrom uses a wide array of primary sources from…
 
The American media has been focused on the Supreme Court’s upcoming abortion cases but a decision in a critical Second Amendment case could overturn public safety laws for 25% of Americans. Next week, the Court will hear arguments in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, a challenge to a 1911 New York State law that limits carrying gu…
 
Listen to this interview of Jari Saramäki, author of How to Write a Scientific Paper: An Academic Self-Help Guide for PhD Students (2018) and professor of computational science at Aalto University, Finland. We talk about how hard soft skills are. Jari Saramäki : "Yes, I think that there is something to a kind of immersion approach to learning. Beca…
 
The Consolations of History is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Teofilo Ruiz, Professor Emeritus of History at UCLA. Teo Ruiz is a scholar of the social and popular cultures of late medieval and early modern Spain and the Western Mediterranean. He received the University’s Distinguished Teaching Award and was award…
 
Connected: How a Mexican Village Built Its Own Cell Phone Network (U California Press, 2020) is the true story of how, against all odds, a remote Mexican pueblo built its own autonomous cell phone network—without help from telecom companies or the government. Anthropologist Roberto J. González paints a vivid and nuanced picture of life in a Oaxaca …
 
The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America (MIT Press, 2020) considers the intersection of food and immigration at both the macroscale of national policy and the microscale of immigrant foodways—the intimate, daily performances of identity, culture, and community through food. Taken together, the chapters—which range fr…
 
During the mid-19th century, the works of Arthur Schopenhauer and Richard Wagner sparked an impulse toward German cultural renewal and social change that drew on religious myth, metaphysics, and spiritualism. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate ar…
 
​Introduced in June 1938, the Man of Steel was created by two Jewish teens, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, the sons of immigrants from Eastern Europe. They based their hero’s origin story on Moses, his strength on Samson, his mission on the golem and his nebbish secret identity on themselves. They made him a refugee fleeing catastrophe on the eve of…
 
In Defending Beef: The Ecological and Nutritional Case for Meat (Chelsea Green, 2021), Nicolette Hahn Niman makes the expanded case for large ruminants as part of the solution to the climate crisis. In our discussion, Hahn Niman does some myth-busting and presents a system for managing beef cattle that can enhance ecosystems rather than degrade the…
 
Digital games for learning are now commonplace, used in settings that range from K–12 education to advanced medical training. In Making Games for Impact (MIT Press, 2021), Kurt Squire examines the ways that games make an impact on learning, investigating how designers and developers incorporate authentic social impact goals, build a team, and work …
 
On today’s podcast, I am chopping it up with my dear friend and play cousin Dr. Imani Perry, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Dr. Perry is on the program today to discuss her intellectual and political foundations, her mother, AKA, the person that trained yours truely at Simmons University, none other…
 
In Rebel Music in the Triumphant Empire (Oxford University Press, 2020), musicologist David Pearson explores the changing landscape of punk in the United States in the 1990s. Pearson examines how the 1990s underground punk renaissance transformed the punk scene into a site of radical opposition to the American empire. Nazi skinheads were ejected fr…
 
Today I talked to Clare Pooley about her novel The Authenticity Project (Penguin, 2020). In this chatty, very British story, a few personal lines written in a “pale-green exercise book like the one Monica had carried around with her at school,” inadvertently trigger enormous personal change in a group of strangers. Monica owns the café where Julian…
 
On today’s podcast, I am chopping it up with my dear friend and play cousin Dr. Imani Perry, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Dr. Perry is on the program today to discuss her intellectual and political foundations, her mother, AKA, the person that trained yours truely at Simmons University, none other…
 
European Decadence, a controversial artistic movement that flourished mainly in late-nineteenth-century France and Britain, has inspired several generations of Chinese writers and literary scholars since it was introduced to China in the early 1920s. Translated into Chinese as tuifei, which has strong hedonistic and pessimistic connotations, the co…
 
On the 63rd episode of The Bald Head-N-The Dread Podcast Autarchii and Jr reason the word 'ghetto'. The word 'ghetto' is usually used when identifying a segregated of city stricken by poverty and crime. The term 'ghetto' is also used to identify things are broken or of low quality. They argue in the reasoning that a ghetto is not a place ,but a men…
 
Data is now central to the economy, government, and health systems—so why are data and the AI systems that interpret the data in the hands of so few people? Alex Pentland and Alexander Lipton's Building the New Economy: Data As Capital (MIT Press, 2021) calls for us to reinvent the ways that data and artificial intelligence are used in civic and go…
 
This episode feature an interview with Michael Alexander, one of the most innovative small university presidents in the U.S. He discusses a number of the innovations during his 15-year tenure at Lasell University located in the suburbs of Boston, MA: Lasell Village, a very successful retirement community where residents sign up to be full-time stud…
 
Religion and Culture: A Historian’s Tale is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Miri Rubin, Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at Queen Mary University of London. After behind-the-scenes insights into Miri Rubin’s career path which led her from chemistry to working in an orthopaedic hospital to studying me…
 
Dr. Emily Greble, Associate Professor of History at Vanderbilt University, is the author of Muslims and the Making of Modern Europe (Oxford University Press, 2021). Focusing on the Muslim inhabitants of the Austro-Hungarian Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia, and later Yugoslavia, as they repeatedly adjusted to shifting borders and modern s…
 
Professor Anna Spain Bradley "wrote this book to be accessible to anyone, because international law is for everyone." In this important book, Professor Anna Spain Bradley explores human choice in international law and political decision making. Human Choice in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2021) investigates the neurobiological pro…
 
In Political Science, we are very familiar with the work of scholars who try to unpack why the ERA failed to get the required states. But Gendered Citizenship: The Original Conflict over the Equal Rights Amendment, 1920-1963 published by the University of Nebraska in 2021 interrogates how earlier debates on the ERA transcended traditional political…
 
Chronicling the retreat of mobile pastoralization from Mediterranean coastlines, Andrea Duffy's Nomad's Land: Pastoralism and French Environmental Policy in the Nineteenth-Century Mediterranean World (U Nebraska Press, 2019) investigates a mystery: where did the sheep go? Duffy seeks the answer by exploring the relationship between forestry policy …
 
In An Urban History of China (Cambridge UP, 2021), Toby Lincoln offers the first history of Chinese cities from their origins to the present. Despite being an agricultural society for thousands of years, China had an imperial urban civilization. Over the last century, this urban civilization has been transformed into the world's largest modern urba…
 
In this episode Anna Woodward Kennedy reflects on fundamental issues of relevance to all entrepreneurs. How her challenging childhood home environment in Brazil made her hypervigilant to the moods of others, and how she had to take responsibility early in life. She shares how important it was for her to find mentors and other women as role models, …
 
For nine years, Stephen Colbert’s persona “Colbert”?—a Republican superhero and parody of conservative political pundits--informed audiences on current events, politics, social issues, and religion while lampooning conservative political policy, biblical literalism, and religious hypocrisy. To devout, vocal, and authoritative lay Catholics, religio…
 
The battle between Marvelous Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns is remembered as one of the greatest fights of all time. But in the months before the two finally collided on April 15, 1985, there was a feeling in the air that boxing was in trouble. The biggest name in the business, Sugar Ray Leonard, was retired with no logical replacement in sight, w…
 
In this episode, I interview Ethan Kleinberg, professor of history and letters at Wesleyan University, about his new book, Emmanuel Levinas’s Talmudic Turn: Philosophy and Jewish Thought, recently published by Stanford University Press. In this rich intellectual history of the French-Jewish philosopher Emmanuel Levinas's Talmudic lectures in Paris,…
 
“My poetry captures a moment,” remarked Dr. Castillo when asked about the process of writing her most recent collection of poems My Book of the Dead: New Poems (University of New Mexico Press, 2021). While many of us would be immobile at the news about the effects of climate disaster, school shootings, and anti-black racism which often resulted in …
 
Alluring, nurturing, dangerous, and vulnerable, the yamamba, or Japanese mountain witch, has intrigued audiences for centuries. What is it about the fusion of mountains with the solitary old woman that produces such an enigmatic figure? And why does she still call to us in this modern, scientific era? Co-editors Rebecca Copeland and Linda C. Ehrlic…
 
Who should have the last word on labeling music? The music industry or the music consumer? Well, we will probably never know the answer anytime in the near future, but the dialogue can lead to all involved taking note. Music Critic, Author, and oh yeah, Associate Professor of American studies and Media studies at the University of Virginia joins ou…
 
For decades, segregation forced African-Americans migrating from the South to Detroit into one neighborhood: "Black "Bottom," an area just east of downtown, which is now Lafayette Park. Urban renewal plowed the neighborhood under in the 1950s, destroying what had been a thriving place that gave the world Joe Louis and Coleman Young. But the memory …
 
Morning Meditations Psalm 96 Morning Meditations take the time to stop for a moment and embrace inspirational words that refuel us for the day. These moments of inspiration are taken from the Bible and special inspirational readings. Hopefully this time will inspire you as the listener to start your week with hope, joy, love, and peace. Enjoy a mom…
 
In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams is in conversation with Dr. Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall about Haiti in history and popular culture. Dr. Williams is Associate Professor of African American history at Monmouth University. Dr. Goldstein Sepinwall is Professor and Graduate Studies Coordinator in the Department of History at California State Univ…
 
As‌ ‌we’ve‌ ‌explored‌ ‌throughout‌ ‌the‌ ‌podcast,‌ ‌the‌ ‌music‌ ‌industry‌ ‌loves‌ ‌to‌ ‌put‌ ‌people‌ ‌in‌ ‌a‌ ‌box.‌ ‌ For‌ ‌pop‌ ‌stars,‌ ‌the‌ ‌expectations‌ ‌are‌ ‌strict‌ ‌–‌ ‌be‌ ‌a‌ ‌sexy,‌ ‌womanly‌ ‌figure‌ ‌that‌ ‌men‌ ‌will‌ ‌find‌ ‌ desirable‌ ‌and‌ ‌keep‌ ‌your‌ ‌opinions‌ ‌to‌ ‌yourself.‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ But‌ ‌Halsey‌ ‌(she/they)‌ ‌can’t‌ ‌…
 
Baylor University Professor Julie Anne Sweet taught a class on the American military during the Revolutionary War, including a look at the equipment and capabilities of both the Continental Army and militia troops. She also compared the advantages and disadvantages of the American and British forces. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphon…
 
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