show episodes
 
The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
Earth. We broke it; we own it; and nothing is as it was: not the trees, not the seas – not the forests, farms, or fields – and not the global economy that depends on all of these. Bionic Planet is your guide to the Anthropocene, the new epoch defined by man's impact on Earth, and in each episode, we examine a different aspect of this new reality: sometimes financial, sometimes moral, but always practical.
 
stopGOstop, explores the idea that sound recordings can act as sediment– as an accumulation of recorded cultural material– distributed via rss feed, and listened to on headphones. Each episode is a new sonic layer, field recordings, plunderphonics, electroacoustic, all composed together in one episode, or presented individually as striations. Produced by John Wanzel
 
Did you know that humans have now changed the earth more than all other natural forces combined? What the heck is the Anthropocene? How does it affect you and your life? In this series, we answer those questions as we journey across this planet and dig into some of the most urgent issues of our time. This is our world as you’ve never thought of it before. Hosted by Sarain Fox. New episodes are released on Tuesdays. This podcast was produced to go along with the exhibition Anthropocene, featu ...
 
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here: theguardian.com/covid19questions
 
Were you a fan of Delete This? Did you want a worse version of it? No one asked, but we delivered! Join two best friends who met on Twitter as we take a look back at our week by reading (and roasting) Hank Green’s tweets and our own. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/retweetthis/support
 
How do we learn to negotiate a world of growing complexity and uncertainty? Perpetual Novelty is a six-episode set of conversations from Perry Chen, artist and the founder of Kickstarter. A long-time critic of the attention economy, Chen served on the Knight Commission on Trust, Media, and Democracy from 2017-18 to examine and make recommendations in response to the collapse in trust in U.S. democratic institutions, media, journalism, and the information ecosystem. In 2018, he was honored wi ...
 
Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. Change your perspe ...
 
Tune in to the Always Already Podcast for indulgent conversations about critical theory (in the broadest read of the term!). Our podcast consists of two episode streams. The first is a discussion of texts spanning critical theory, political theory, social theory, and philosophy. We work through and analyze main ideas, underlying assumptions, connections with other texts and theories, and occasionally delve into the great abyss of free association, ad hoc theory jokes, and makeshift puns. The ...
 
Conservation journalist Byron Pace speaks with scientists, environmental advocates, conservationists, wildlife managers and a diverse array of global guests, to uncover the complex nature of the world we live. Into The Anthropocene aims to make the science of conservation more accessible, exploring stories and research from the frontline. Only through understanding our world can we improve our decision making and define the Anthropocene for the betterment of humanity and the planet. Visit: w ...
 
A is for Anthropocene: Living in the Age of Humanity is a bi-weekly podcast that digs into the multitude of questions about human impact on our planet. Host Sloan MacRae and Steve Tonsor interview experts in science and the arts to tackle tough issues like climate change and species decline without giving up hope that we can still leave the Earth in excellent condition for generations to come.
 
The 1st Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures of October 1981 emphasized the importance of vibrant regional economies at a time when the focus of the nation was on an expanding global economy. Much has happened since then. The promise of the global economy has faded in face of ever greater wealth disparity and environmental degradation. There is growing interest in building a new economy that is just and recognizes planetary limits. The speakers of the Schumacher Lecture Series continue to be at ...
 
A current affairs program produced at Triple R in Melbourne, Australia. Exploring domestic issues in a global context, The Grapevine features interviews with those in the know, providing insights into our politics, cities, rights, cultures and the environment. Hosted by Kulja Coulston and Dylan Bird. The intro and outro theme is Soft Illusion and was generously provided by Andras. https://andras.bandcamp.com/track/soft-illusion
 
In Common explores the connections between humans, their environment and each other through stories told by scholars and practitioners. In-depth interviews and methods webinars explore interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary work on commons governance, conservation and development, social-ecological resilience, and sustainability.
 
Join your Personal Mythmaking host Janelle Hardy as she asks her guests the same four questions: Whose traditional territory are you on? What’s your favourite fairytale/ancient tale? What’s your relationship with your body like? And what’s your connection to your creativity? These potent conversations are created by mixing lifestories, memoir-writing, creativity, the body, fairytales + conversation together with wild abandon. Through the lens of personal experience and conversation, these ex ...
 
What do intellectual historians currently investigate? And why is this relevant for us today? These are some of the questions our podcast series, led by graduate students at Cambridge, seeks to explore. It aims to introduce intellectual historians and their work to everyone with an interest in history and politics. Do join in on our conversations! (The theme song of "Interventions | The Intellectual History Podcast" was created at jukedeck.com)
 
An honest podcast about the state of our relationship with wild nature. Renouncing harmful anthropocentric ideals, focusing on true essentials for an adequate life as a human being; and recognizing the indispensability of our tremendously diverse world by establishing a greater sense of place within that world. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ It will host an on-going discussion about the needs of nature, exploring the current environmental crisis, the importance of our reconnection t ...
 
Embodiment Matters is an ongoing, rich conversation about what it really means to be embodied, and why and how embodiment matters so much in our daily lives and in our world. Our guests include wise and insightful teachers from the realms of somatics, Buddhism, meditation, social justice, psychotherapy, movement arts, bodywork, martial arts, neuroscience, environmentalists, indigenous teachers,​ and more. In our conversations, we explore a wide range of topics around waking up and being embo ...
 
Two philosophers—or what comedian Mel Brooks fondly refers to as "bullshit artists"—from different generations join in deep yet casual conversation covering a wide range of topics, including especially politics and the human condition. Jack Crittenden—professor emeritus of political theory at Arizona State University—and Rory Varrato—PhD candidate in the Philosophy and Education program at Teachers College, Columbia University—have known each other for more than ten years, first as teacher-s ...
 
Extinction Rebellion NYC talks with experts, citizens, and rebels from the frontlines, diving deep into the climate and ecological emergency, the need for a regenerative culture and transition, and why we need to ACT NOW! Extinction Rebellion is a global nonviolent movement to compel the world’s governments to address the climate and ecological emergency. We demand that the government and media Tell the Truth, that the government Act Now to halt biodiversity loss and reduce greenhouse gases ...
 
Habitations is the podcast of Sage Magazine, the environmental journalism and arts publication at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. It explores the relationships between humans and the places that they inhabit, through interviews and narrative pieces.
 
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show series
 
Through various international case studies presented by both practitioners and scholars, Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene: From (Un)Just Presents to Just Futures (Routledge, 2021) explores how an environmental justice approach is necessary for reflections on inequality in the Anthropocene and for forging societal transitions toward a more …
 
The Anthropocene Reviewed started out as a podcast, where bestselling author John Green tried to make sense of some of the contradictions of human life – how we can be so compassionate, and yet so cruel. So persistent, yet so quick to despair. Green says that above all, he wanted to understand the contradiction of human power; how we are too powerf…
 
LINKS buymeacoffee.com/changeug The ChangeUnderground Academy No-Dig Gardening Course: https://worldorganicnews.com/changeunderground/ FREE eBook: https://worldorganicnews.com/freeebook/ email: jon@worldorganicnews.com Transcript https://worldorganicnews.com/episode263/ Episode 260. Small Scale Grain Growing Bubugo Conservation Trust http://www.bub…
 
John Green reviews a particular Ginkgo biloba tree. The Anthropocene Reviewed book is out now and is a #1 New York Times Bestseller! The San Francisco Chronicle called it the perfect book for "whenever you need a reminder of what it is to feel small and human in the best possible way." Order a copy online or at your local bookstore: anthropocenerev…
 
A portfolio manager turned activist, Ulf takes us inside some recent fixed income transactions that imply some banks (and some pensions) are taking their commitments to ESG less than seriously. He then disaggregates the "yield pickup" that buyers of fossil fuel debt have been feasting on, explains how his activist ESG strategy benefits from fixed i…
 
LINKS buymeacoffee.com/changeug The ChangeUnderground Academy No-Dig Gardening Course: https://worldorganicnews.com/changeunderground/ FREE eBook: https://worldorganicnews.com/freeebook/ email: jon@worldorganicnews.com Transcript https://worldorganicnews.com/episode265/ Bubugo Conservation Trust http://www.bubugoconservation.org/ Amazon rainforest …
 
We cannot adapt our way out of the climate mess, as Allie Goldstein of Conservation International and Mark Trexler of the Climate Web make clear. We discuss the realities of systemic climate risk. Research cited in today’s show: "The private sector’s climate change risk and adaptation blind spots" https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0340-5 "…
 
The image most of us have of whalers includes harpoons and intentional trauma. Yet eating commercially caught seafood leads to whales' entanglement and slow death in rope and nets, and the global shipping routes that bring us readily available goods often lead to death by collision. We--all of us--are whalers, marine scientist and veterinarian Mich…
 
What influence can online and visual activism have on protest movements? With a wave of anti-establishment protests sweeping over East and Southeast Asia over the past couple of years, the online phenomenon of the #MilkTeaAlliance has gained increasing international recognition. In this episode of the Nordic Asia Podcast Chiara Elisabeth Pecorari i…
 
What would it feel like to wake up inside the head of someone who writes about science for a living? John Horgan, acclaimed author of the bestseller The End of Science, answers that question in his genre-bending new book Pay Attention: Sex, Death, and Science (MIT Press, 2020), a stream-of-consciousness account of a day in the life of his alter ego…
 
The image most of us have of whalers includes harpoons and intentional trauma. Yet eating commercially caught seafood leads to whales' entanglement and slow death in rope and nets, and the global shipping routes that bring us readily available goods often lead to death by collision. We--all of us--are whalers, marine scientist and veterinarian Mich…
 
In Radiant Infrastructures: Media, Environment, and Cultures of Uncertainty (Duke UP, 2020), Rahul Mukherjee explores how the media coverage of nuclear power plants and cellular phone antennas in India—what he calls radiant infrastructures—creates environmental publics: groups of activists, scientists, and policy makers who use media to influence p…
 
The image most of us have of whalers includes harpoons and intentional trauma. Yet eating commercially caught seafood leads to whales' entanglement and slow death in rope and nets, and the global shipping routes that bring us readily available goods often lead to death by collision. We--all of us--are whalers, marine scientist and veterinarian Mich…
 
In this episode, the conversation begins with an exploration of Jack’s thoughts on near-death experiences (NDEs) and similar phenomena, about which he has written extensively, including in his book, 'Stalking White Crows.’ Rory then raises the case of Pam Reynolds, a woman who claims to have had a vivid out-of-body experience while undergoing surge…
 
With two megacities and strong economic growth, Indonesia has seen dramatic rates of rural-urban migrations. According to the World Bank, nearly 70 percent of Indonesia's population are expected to live in cities by 2045. While this transition has undoubtedly boosted the country's economic growth, it has also brought to the fore all the challenges …
 
In Epidemic Illusions: On the Coloniality of Global Public Health (MIT Press, 2020), physician-anthropologist Eugene T. Richardson explores how public health practices—from epidemiological modeling to outbreak containment—help perpetuate global inequities. This book questions the Global North's "monopoly on truth" in global public health science, m…
 
Drawing together 18 contributions from leading international scholars, Cinema of Exploration: Essays on an Adventurous Film Practice (Routledge, 2021) conceptualizes the history and theory of cinema’s century-long relationship to modes of exploration in its many forms, from colonialist expeditions to decolonial radical cinemas to the perceptual voy…
 
In Epidemic Illusions: On the Coloniality of Global Public Health (MIT Press, 2020), physician-anthropologist Eugene T. Richardson explores how public health practices—from epidemiological modeling to outbreak containment—help perpetuate global inequities. This book questions the Global North's "monopoly on truth" in global public health science, m…
 
What makes some cities world class? Increasingly, that designation reflects the use of a toolkit of urban planning practices and policies that circulates around the globe. These strategies—establishing creative districts dedicated to technology and design, “greening” the streets, reinventing historic districts as tourist draws—were deployed to buil…
 
We learned in our previous episode about the very real consequences that extreme heat has on human health and wellbeing, but there is little research into what actually happens to our bodies when exposed to extreme heat apart from in the world of sports science. In the second part of our discussion, as fears mount that the Tokyo Olympics will be th…
 
Welcome to our book club, where we discuss Twilight, our current audiobooks, and eventually Twitter. Also, please accept our apologies for ruining your Sesame Street memories for you. There's no BABFER this week, but stay tuned until the end for a special Brint cameo! Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/retweetthispod to see what we're talking abou…
 
This week on the podcast we begin our conversation with Dr. Michael Lujan Bevacqua by discussing Guåhan’s incredibly layered history, as well as the CHamoru history that predates any colonial narrative by thousands of years. With an understanding of how Guåhan (Guam) ended up as a “territory” of the United States, Michael shares the current efforts…
 
Bill Plotkin, Ph.D., is a depth psychologist, wilderness guide, and agent of cultural evolution. As founder of western Colorado’s Animas Valley Institute in 1981, he has guided thousands of seekers through nature-based initiatory passages, including a contemporary, Western adaptation of the pan-cultural vision fast. Previously, he has been a resear…
 
Andrew Jenks' book Collaboration in Space and the Search for Peace on Earth (Anthem Press, 2021) explores the era of space collaboration (from 1970 to the present). This period has been largely ignored by historians in favor of a focus on the earlier space race. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, a key program and catalyst for Détente, marked the trans…
 
Why has the United States, the world’s premier military and economic power, struggled recently to achieve its foreign policy desiderata? How might America’s leaders reconsider the application of power for a world of asymmetric and unconventional threats? In his new book, Power and Complacency: American Survival in an Age of International Competitio…
 
Suzanne Simard is a professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences and teaches at the University of British Columbia. She was born in the Monashee Mountains of British Columbia in 1960. Her family were loggers, so it seemed like a natural fit for her to join a commercial logging company as she started her career. Her job was to che…
 
It’s hard to imagine a place more central to American mythology today than Silicon Valley. To outsiders, the region glitters with the promise of extraordinary wealth and innovation. But behind this image lies another Silicon Valley, one segregated by race, class, and nationality in complex and contradictory ways. Its beautiful landscape lies atop u…
 
Through various international case studies presented by both practitioners and scholars, Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene: From (Un)Just Presents to Just Futures (Routledge, 2021) explores how an environmental justice approach is necessary for reflections on inequality in the Anthropocene and for forging societal transitions toward a more …
 
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