show episodes
 
The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. Ranked the #1 Think Tank to Watch worldwide, the Council on Global Affairs is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
What does the American public think about China, internal v. external threats, and who benefits from US foreign policy? This week we were joined by Craig Kafura with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs to discuss the results of their recent survey about all things foreign policy. Also this episode: the Philippines' Duterte problem as a structural…
 
2020 marked the most significant increase in US domestic terrorism in a quarter-century, data from the Center for Strategic and International Studies reveals. The University of Chicago’s Kathleen Belew and Robert Pape join Deep Dish to explain the trends they believe are driving the uptick and the role war and conflict play in shaping these groups.…
 
For decades, American foreign policy on Taiwan has been rooted in strategic ambiguity, but after China’s President Xi Jinping’s call for “reunification” with Taiwan and record military presence near the island, is it time to rethink this approach? Rand Corporation’s Michael Mazarr and the Commander Michele Lowe join Deep Dish to explore the options…
 
In this special event, Dr. Van Jackson discussed AUKUS and Indo-Pacific strategy at the Australian Institute of International Affairs (AIIA). He's joined by Bryce Wakefield (AIIA), Maria Rost-Rublee (University of Melbourne), Nick Bisley (Latrobe University), and Benjamin Zala (Australian National University).…
 
The 2021 Chicago Council Survey shows Americans are on board with the majority of the Biden administration’s foreign policy agenda, which is focused on decisions that benefit everyday Americans. But when it comes to trade, there are important differences between public opinion and this approach to foreign policy. Council President Ivo Daalder and t…
 
With Van Jackson out on holiday, Sebastian Strangio (Southeast Asia editor at The Diplomat) joined the crew as guest host. This episode talks about his origins in journalism in Cambodia, Myanmar civil war, the problem with values and ideology in great-power competition with China, and his concerns with the risks of US authoritarianism. Sebastian's …
 
German voters prioritized stability in the first post-Merkel election—voting for the party who most emulated the former chancellor’s approach to government, the Social Democrats (SPD), instead of Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU). What does the narrow SPD victory tell us about the German political landscape and important Western trends like…
 
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gambled on a snap election that left him in power, but without a majority in Parliament. With an election behind him, can he make progress on the critical foreign policy issues his government must tackle—from COVID-19 to multilateral engagement—during his third term? Canadian political scientists Roland Paris …
 
Why South Korea's Bernie Sanders is no Bernie when it comes to foreign policy. Why Australia's submarine decision is vulgar balancing (but not useless). Marxism versus liberalism. Why the pandemic proves the world sucks at collective action. Xi Jinping's common prosperity drive pits labor against oligarchy, but not the way you think. Lil Uzi Hurt T…
 
Years of underinvestment, politicization, and data on looming retention problems raise urgent questions about the need for change in the United States Department of State. Ambassador Marcie Ries and Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Fellow Constanza Castro Zúñiga join Deep Dish to explain why diplomacy is still critical for American foreign p…
 
Why defense grifters and jingoes love deterrence-by-denial strategies. Why Manny Pacquiao could beat Duterte, and why that might not be good for the Philippines. WTH is a classical liberal? Also this episode: Is China the new standard-setter in tech? Jacob Levy Tweet: https://twitter.com/jtlevy/status/1424458950838263813?s=21 Kendra Schaefer Tweet:…
 
The US military may have exited the conflict in Afghanistan, but thousands of those who helped during the war remain. What does the United States owe those we leave behind, and is there a better way to prevent chaos and loss of life after war? Virginia Tech’s Amanda Demmer and the Council’s Elizabeth Shackelford join Deep Dish to explore the lesson…
 
Globalization promised us collaboration, peace, and prosperity. But did the connectivity that linked our world together increase conflict and drive our geopolitical priorities farther apart? The European Council on Foreign Relation’s Mark Leonard joins Deep Dish to discuss his new book The Age of Unpeace and his proposal for policymakers navigating…
 
After weeks of finger-pointing and accusations about the catastrophic US retreat from Afghanistan, we’re taking a step back to ask some big-picture questions. What if the problem isn’t the exit, but the strategy that started the intervention in the first place: counterinsurgency? US Naval War College author Jacqueline Hazelton joins Deep Dish to ex…
 
What will the Taliban’s Afghanistan takeover mean for Pakistan—a US ally, a nuclear power, and a country beset by its own terrorism threats—and will the government’s decades-long support of the Taliban backfire? Brookings’ Madiha Afzal and the Financial Times’ Farhan Bokhari join Deep Dish to explain Pakistan’s priorities, foreign policy, and optio…
 
In this special cross-over episode, Dr. Van Jackson speaks with Future Tense host and director of research for Diplomat Risk Intelligence, Abhijnan Rej. They talk about scenario-based planning, intelligence failures, the perils of net assessment, and why it all matters in the context of the botched Afghanistan withdrawal. Future Tense pod: https://…
 
What's going on with the Quincy Institute v. liberal internationalism debate? How neoliberalism gave us the far right. What's a master's in IR really worth? Can you have too many national security experts (yes)? How anti-hegemonist politics gives rise to campism within the left. Also this episode: China's empire-building in Tibet and Bhutan. Nathan…
 
Cryptocurrencies have moved away from their anarchic origins to spark political conversations that could shift national currencies and redefine the global economy. Former Chairman of the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission Tim Massad and the Financial Times’ Gillian Tett join Brian Hanson on Deep Dish to explore digital currencies and their eff…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login