show episodes
 
Sticky Notes is a classical music podcast for everyone, whether you are just getting interested in classical music for the first time, or if you've been listening to it and loving it all your life. Interviews with great artists, in depth looks at pieces in the repertoire, and both basic and deep dives into every era of music. Classical music is absolutely for everyone, so let's start listening! Note - Seasons 1-5 will be returning over the next year. They have been taken down in order to be ...
 
Join host Sean Perrin as he discusses “all that’s new and neat with clarinet, with the neatest people in the industry” on the world’s most popular clarinet podcast. Past guests include distinguished artists such as Martin Fröst, Michael Lowenstern, and Lori Freedman, and product manufacturers such as Legere Reeds, Backun Musical Services, and Royal Musical Instruments. Check out the website at www.clarineat.com and be sure to subscribe to our email newsletter for a chance to win giveaways.
 
Radio Ekonomika is a series of educational radio conversations on economic and financial issues, based on a critical reading of the press. A journalist specialised in economics and finance or an economist will introduce some important themes from the news, give some explanations and comments in non-technical language, then open the floor to the audience to comment and ask questions. The conversations take place either in English or French. Contact: DGT-RADIO@ec.europa.eu Music: W. A. Mozart, ...
 
Clarinet Corner is an exploration of music involving the clarinet. The show features music across genres including: classical, jazz, world, film music, and rock. And the lively conversation includes topics such as: musical history and practice, social justice, playing in a film orchestra, and colorful stories about jazz players. You don't have to be a clarinet player or a musician to join in, host Tim Phillips makes the show accessible to everyone!
 
Join host Sean Rice (Second Clarinet, NAC Orchestra) as he explores the world of classical music and its great composers. In this series of audio programmes you can look forward to hearing insightful commentary about upcoming NAC Orchestra programmes as well as musical excerpts and interviews with NACO musicians and guest artists.
 
Welcome to Kibitz and Bitz! Where we argue information security and draw lessons from the weekly Torah portion. A Torah portion is the biblical reading in the Jewish scriptures for a given week. We do have opinions, and we’ll share them with you weekly in an interesting context. Music is taken from the Album: The Klezmer – Clarinet & Violin Best Jewish Music. Klezmer ensemble https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5f5GniIYCm4 by Shmuel Achiezer Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kibitz-n-bitz/ ...
 
Our live afternoon series of “impromptu” music and conversation features some of today’s most sought-after musicians from around the world. Previous guests on Impromptu have included cellist Yo-Yo Ma, mezzo-soprano Joyce Di Donato, and author Salman Rushdie. Other guests have included Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, tenor Joseph Calleja, violinist Joshua Bell, and the vocal ensemble Chanticleer. Broadcast live from the Levin Performance Studio at WFMT, the program also features local performers ...
 
Be Your Own Manager is a career podcast for classical musicians from the former CEO and Artistic Director of the Vienna Concert House, Bernhard Kerres. Learn how to win your next engagement, how to build up a fan base, and how to market yourself. The podcast is an extension to the career handbook for classical musicians, Be Your Own Manager, which Bernhard co-authored with Bettina Mehne. More about the podcast, the book, and regular courses on www.beyourownmanager.com. Thanks for listening!
 
The Crossing The Break Podcast discusses the nuts and bolts of teaching clarinet at the beginning and intermediate levels. We will cover aspects of playing clarinet including tone, embouchure, hand position, tonguing, technique, range, fingerings, tuning and other clarinet-specific items. These ideas can be applied to beginning clarinet class, beginning band, intermediate or advanced clarinetists, and in an individual or group setting. The host of this podcast is Tamarie Sayger. A 1999 music ...
 
GaryPHayes's music is a rare hybrid of melodic progressive trance, celtic & world music and cinematic electronica. His versatility lies in his being able to exhibit the sensitivity in combining music of different cultures required for a wide range of film genre and being able to utilise both full orchestral scoring through arrangement and production to cutting edge electronic music realisation and sound design.Gary became interested in music at an early age and was playing guitar and clarine ...
 
Pathways is dedicated to telling the stories of some of our heroes for the french horn. From starting on the instrument, all the way up to the highest levels of our field, we all have one very important thing in common, and that's we all play the horn. What else do we have in common? Listen to find out!
 
Composers Datebook™ is a daily two-minute program designed to inform, engage, and entertain listeners with timely information about composers of the past and present. Each program notes significant or intriguing musical events involving composers of the past and present, with appropriate and accessible music related to each.
 
Music for the mature mind: Russ and Mike discuss recent classical and jazz releases from their secret mountain lair in Japan. Find something new to listen to each week with complete release info and streaming links to Spotify, Apple Music, and our episode playlist on Deezer. Contact us at: adultmusicpodcast@gmail.com
 
The Rise To The Top with David Siteman Garland podcast is a look behind-the-scenes (the good, bad, ugly and hilarious insanity) from David's (aka DSG’s) multiple 7-figure online business (#938 on the Inc. 5000 list in 2017). DSG’s education and software company teaches awesome people how to create and sell online courses through his #1 program Create Awesome Online Courses and Course Cats software. Tune in for stories, tips, advice, behind-the-scenes craziness and uncensored, uncut interview ...
 
In a post-apocalyptic world with no internet or electricity, five disparate factions vie for dominance in the city-state of Fiveboro. Each tribe worships at the altar of the bygone pop-culture references of an earlier time, and relishes the stories of film and television they've never actually seen. The Fansci Folk live in a Sci-Fi/Fantasy cosplay kingdom, the Escandalistas invoke the drama of the Telenovelas, The Criterione Collective praises the independent Art Film, the Snookis favor "rea ...
 
A fun-packed, adventure-filled fictional series - where you come along for the journey! You'll follow teenager Connie, who lives with her parents above their struggling, family-run travel business. So she's invented a different way to take a holiday - using your imagination! In each, sing and move-along episode, you join Connie and her plucky team of explorers as they take you on a series of Armchair Adventures. You’ll visit magical places and meet extraordinary people. Armchair Adventures i ...
 
In this podcast series we go inside the orchestra comparing how New York Philharmonic musicians over time played certain licks or passages in a variety of works. Are they the same or different and why? Our guides in this journey are the Philharmonic players themselves in conversation with the Orchestra’s Archivist and Historian Emerita Barbara Haws.
 
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show series
 
Synopsis During his later years, the German composer Johannes Brahms was a frequent visitor to the town of Meiningen, where the Grand Duke had a fine orchestra that gave stellar performances of Brahms’ music. Early in 1891, Brahms heard one member of that orchestra, the clarinetist Richard Mülhfeld, perform chamber works by Mozart and Weber. Brahms…
 
Synopsis In the 1920s, the German composer Paul Hindemith wrote a set of seven concertos, which he collectively titled: “Kammermusik” or “Chamber Music.” This generic title was part of Hindemith’s goal to foster a more “objective” musical style, modeled on 18th century composers like J.S. Bach. Hindemith’s “Kammermusik” No. 4, a work for solo violi…
 
Antranig Kzirian sits down with Becca Stevens, Ara Dinkjian, Ismail Lumanovski, and Tamer Pinarbaşi to discuss their new collaboration entitled "Becca Stevens and The Secret Trio". 2021 GRAMMY-nominated Becca Stevens was in awe witnessing The Secret Trio’s performance at the GroundUP Music Festival a few years ago. The Secret Trio is made up of an …
 
Synopsis On today’s date in 1947, the German composer Hans Eisler, who had been living in the United States since 1938, was called to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities. This was some years before Joseph McCarthy headed the investigations, but one member of the committee was a first-term Californian congressman by the name…
 
It's 1905 and you've just come to the premiere of Debussy's La Mer. The orchestra begins playing, and a magical and completely unique journey begins. Gone are the peaceful and placid portrayals of water in music of the past. Instead, you hear strange harmonies and a diffuse language that seems to revel in ambiguity. In fact, it sounds more like an …
 
Synopsis Today we celebrate the birthday of Leonardo Balada, an American composer born in Barcelona on today’s date in 1933. After studying at the Barcelona Conservatory, the 20-something composer came to New York on a musical scholarship. Balada recalls his arrival as both a cultural and climatic shock: “When I landed in New York – on a freezing d…
 
Synopsis “Are people still writing concertos for harpsichord?” you ask. Well, today, we have an answer, which is “Yes!” On today’s date in 2002, this new Concerto for Harpsichord and Chamber Orchestra by Philip Glass had its premiere performance at Benaroya Hall in Seattle. Glass was asked to write a new Harpsichord Concerto for the Northwest Chamb…
 
Private clarinet teacher and coach Kelly Riordan joins Sam on today's episode. She coaches and mentors other music teachers on how to best build their studios to attract more students. A must listen for those interested in making private teaching a main source of income! For more information about Kelly, please visit http://kellyriordan.com…
 
Synopsis When we think of Russian music in Paris, the name Sergei Diaghilev comes first to mind. In the early years of the 20th century, that famous Russian impresario saw to it that not only the new music of Stravinsky was performed in the French capital, but also a historical panorama of earlier Russian works, including Mussorgsky’s opera, “Boris…
 
In this episode, we discuss recordings of “Female” by Lucie Bartholomäi & Verena Louis, “Farrenc: Symphony Nos. 1 & 3” by Insula Orchestra & Laurence Equilbey, “Joan Tower: Strike Zones” by Evelyn Glennie, Blair McMillen, Albany Symphony & David Alan Miller, “Mirror Mirror” by Eliane Elias, “What I Meant to Say” by Steve Million, and “Then and Agai…
 
Somehow, after all these years, Haydn has been overlooked by us. Well, Haydn is no longer hidden from our minds, and to correct this shameful misstep, we're kicking off a multi-part mini series on Haydn. Be sure to like, and share with a friend! (corrected file) Music: https://imslp.org/wiki/String_Quartet_in_G_major%2C_Hob.III:58_(Haydn%2C_Joseph)…
 
Synopsis The American composer Virgil Thomson was fond of writing what he called “portraits” –musical sketches of people he knew. When asked how he did this, Thomson replied: “I just look at you and I write down what I hear.” One of these works – a portrait in disguise – premiered on today’s date in 1954 at the Venice Festival in Italy. Identified …
 
La traduction, c’est le savoir-faire avec les différences culturelles. Le réseau des « Maisons de la Sagesse » établi par la philosophe Barbara Cassin a une triple fonction : mettre à pied un glossaire bilingue pour aider l’administration française à comprendre des notions culturelles difficiles, à contribuer à l’insertion de l’étranger et à la rec…
 
Synopsis In 1871, one year after the premiere in Munich of Richard Wagner’s opera “Die Walküre,” a German-born American conductor named Theodore Thomas wrote Wagner asking if he might perform excerpts of this new work in the United States. Wagner turned him down, worried that loose American copyright laws might not protect his new music. Undeterred…
 
Mozart’s Jupiter Symphony is a piece that can practically define the classical era symphony. Mozart pulls out every trick in the compositional book and practically sums up everything written before him. It is a symphony full of musical cliches, self-references, and in some cases, flat out thefts from other composers. But as always with Mozart, the …
 
Synopsis There’s a book entitled “Great Operatic Disasters” which chronicles the sometime humorous – and sometimes harrowing – mishaps that have befallen opera singers and productions over the last few centuries. According to that book, September 16th seems to have been a particularly unlucky day. Consider that on today’s date in 1782, the Italian …
 
Synopsis On today’s date in 1946, at the Yaddo Music Festival in Saratoga Springs, New York, the Walden Quartet gave the first professional performance of the String Quartet No. 2 by the American composer Charles Ives. Ives’ String Quartet No. 1 was his first major work – its manuscript is dated 1896, back when Ives was a 21-year old student at Yal…
 
Synopsis Today’s date marks the birthday in 1885 of María Joaquina de la Portilla Torres, in the Mexican state of Guanajuato. Under her married name of Maria Grever, she became the first female Mexican composer to achieve international fame. She composed her first song at age four, studied in France with Claude Debussy among others, and at 18, one …
 
Synopsis The Grove Dictionary of Music defines the word “aleatory” as follows: “music whose composition and/or performance is, to a greater or lesser extent, undetermined by the composer.” But isn’t music supposed to be organized, planned, determined sound? Isn’t “aleatoric music” a contradiction in terms? Well, not necessarily. Musicians throughou…
 
In this episode, we discuss recordings of “Roots” by Randall Goosby, “American Quintets” by Matthew Rose and the Kaleidoscope Chamber Collective, “Summertime” by Isata Kanneh-Mason, “Obstacles” by Pete Rodriguez, “Five Down Blues” by The Kyle Asche Organ Trio, and “Connections” by Matthew Whitaker. The Adult Music Podcast is featured in: Feedspot's…
 
Synopsis In the year 1840, the immensely talented German pianist Clara Wieck was eagerly awaiting the eve of her 21st birthday, when she would be free to legally marry the 30-year-old composer and music critic Robert Schumann. The couple had hoped to wed years earlier, but the match was bitterly opposed by Clara’s father. Clara and Robert kept in t…
 
Synopsis On today’s date in 1733, the French composer François Couperin, known as “François Couperin the Great,” died in Paris. The building where Couperin lived for the last decade of his life still stands in Paris, and like the building, the high esteem afforded this Baroque composer has stood the test of time. François Couperin is known as “The …
 
Eugenia Moliner and Denis Azabagic are a Chicago-based husband-and-wife flute and guitar duo who make music as the Cavatina Duo. Violinist Desirée Ruhstrat and cellist David Cunliffe, also a married couple, are both members of the Lincoln Trio, one of Chicago’s most celebrated chamber ensembles. In this Impromptu Encore from 2016, the quartet perfo…
 
The fascinating life and music of Danish composer Carl Nielsen (1865-1931) is the topic of this week's show, and we are delighted to welcome back Andrew Mellor to the Presto Music Podcast to take us through his humble childhood on the island of Funen through to the international acclaim he received as one of the most modernistic symphonic composers…
 
Schumann’s life was marked with severe mental health issues. In 1844, Schumann suffered one of his worst breakdowns yet. He was dizzy, weak, had vision problems, couldn’t sleep, and couldn't listen to music. By 1845 Schumann slowly began to recover and the first wholly new work he produced was a symphony in C Major. As Schumann said, “I began to fe…
 
Synopsis In September of 1825, an Englishman by the name of Sir George Smart came to Vienna, hoping to meet Beethoven. Smart had conducted the British premiere of Beethoven’s Ninth, and wanted, as he put it in his journal, “to ascertain from Beethoven himself the exact tempos of the movements of his sinfonia.” By luck, Smart arrived in time to atte…
 
Synopsis The year 2000 marked both the arrival of a new millennium and the 250th anniversary of the death of the great German Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach. The International Bach Academy in Stuttgart decided to mark the occasion by commissioning four very different composers to write four new passion settings, one each after the Gospel ac…
 
Synopsis In Pittsburgh on today’s date in 1996, the Latin-American Quartet of Mexico gave the premiere of the Third String Quartet of American composer David Stock. Stock was probably best known for his orchestral music served as composer-in-residence with both the Pittsburgh and Seattle Symphonies, writing large-scale works for those ensembles, bu…
 
One can wine about the decline in classical music audiences or look at the facts. Especially during the COVID19 pandemic, more and more people have turned to classical music. Streaming has long overtaken album sales. It is time for any musician to re-think their recording strategies and be present on all streaming platforms. Stop thinking about alb…
 
Synopsis Today we note the birthday anniversary of the American composer and teacher Wayne Barlow, who was born in Elyria, Ohio, on today’s date in 1912, and died in Rochester, New York, in 1996. As a composer, Barlow is mostly remembered for a single work: a rhapsody for oboe and strings entitled “The Winter’s Past,” first performed at the Eastman…
 
Synopsis On today’s date in 1980, “Satyagraha,” an opera by the American composer Philip Glass had its premiere in Rotterdam by the Netherlands Opera. Four years earlier, Glass’s first opera, “Einstein on the Beach,” had scored a big hit not only in Avignon, France, where it had premiered, but also at a special, non-subscription performance at New …
 
Synopsis At New York City’s Town Hall on today’s date in 1968, the New England Festival Quartet premiered a new chamber work by the American composer George Walker. Walker’s String Quartet No. 2 was sandwiched on the program between the String Quartet, Op 95, by Beethoven, and Robert Schumann’s Piano Quintet, Op. 44, with George Walker performing t…
 
Originally broadcast in May 2019, this Impromptu Encore features violinist Sergey Khachatryan, cellist Alisa Weilerstein, and pianist Inon Barnatan in an outstanding performance of Beethoven’s “Ghost” Piano Trio in D Major, Op. 70, No. 1. The post Alisa Weilerstein, cello, Sergey Khachatryan, violin, and Inon Barnatan, piano appeared first on WFMT.…
 
Brahms spent much of his life battling with his ambition to write great symphonies and his terror at the spectre of Beethoven looming over him. His first symphony was a success, and with immense relief, Brahms quickly turned out a second symphony in just 4 months, a bit less than the 14 tortured years it took him to craft the first. At first glance…
 
Synopsis On today’s date in 1806, Ludwig van Beethoven wrote to his publishers Breitkopf and Härtel: “you may have at once three new string quartets.” These were three new works Beethoven had written on commission from the wealthy Russian ambassador to Vienna, Count Andrey Kirillovich Razumovsky. Beethoven was stretching the truth a bit when he tol…
 
Synopsis Imagine a crisp, blue Northern sky, a Canadian Mountie in a bright red tunic, and – what else? – an elaborately coiffed operatic soprano singing in the middle of the woods. Yes, it was on today’s date in 1924, at the Imperial Theater in New York that “The Indian Love Call” was first heard in “Rose-Marie,” a musical written by American comp…
 
Translating Europe is a DGT project created to bring together translation stakeholders in Europe. Inspired by this name, let us call this broadcast Translating World. Radio Lingvistika asks two ex-colleagues from DGT about the respective translation services they work for now: Josep Bonet, who is now in Geneva in the World Trade Organisation and Se…
 
Translating Europe is a DGT project created to bring together translation stakeholders in Europe. Inspired by this name, let us call this broadcast Translating World. Radio Lingvistika asks two ex-colleagues from DGT about the respective translation services they work for now: Josep Bonet, who is now in Geneva in the World Trade Organisation and Se…
 
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