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Stories from the EarthFix team at OPB, KUOW, KCTS 9, Northwest Public Radio and Idaho Public Television. EarthFix is an innovative partnership of the largest public media institutions in the Pacific Northwest established to expand environmental news coverage in the region. With journalists based in Oregon, Washington and Idaho, EarthFix creates media across multiple platforms, helping citizens examine environmental issues unfolding in their own backyards and to explore how local actions inte ...
 
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A controversial logging project is moving forward near a popular entrance to the Eagle Cap Wilderness. It’s igniting a debate over what constitutes forest thinning for wildfire prevention and forest health. Critics see it as exploitation of a loophole — and perhaps the start of a trend in increased logging in the name of forest health across the We…
 
Hunters, fishermen and environmental activists. It’s not often these group are mentioned in the same breath. But recently they’re finding themselves standing shoulder to shoulder over the issue of public lands.Sportsmen and women consider hunting and fishing in these wild places to be their right. And they’re nervous that calls to sell off or trans…
 
Seattle residents were horrified when King County dumped millions of gallons of raw sewage into Puget Sound. Officials blamed it on a malfunction at a waste treatment plant. But raw sewage dumps aren’t as rare as we’d like to think. Even when no disasters happen, cities with combined sewers for their stormwater and sewage have to dump untreated was…
 
As you motor down the highway, you could be driving over dozens of underground passages -- called culverts. Those are metal pipes or concrete boxes that carry streams beneath the roadbed. In the Northwest, thousands of these culverts are poorly designed and maintained -- blocking the way for endangered salmon. That’s why Native American tribes have…
 
Grizzly bears have been stirring up debate for decades in North-Central Washington communities. Most people love them or hate them -- they argue the bears are a necessary part of the ecosystem or a threat to their way of life. The public is getting a new chance to share their opinions at open houses throughout Washington. EarthFix reporter Courtney…
 
California condors once filled the skies from Baja to British Columbia. The giant scavenging bird had a wingspan of 10 feet. But with European settlement, the population crashed. Condors were victims of poisoning that targeted large predators like wolves. Now, the greatest known killer of these highly endangered birds is a different kind of poisoni…
 
For decades, environmental laws have protected North America’s trumpeter swan from sport hunting, but every year swans in the Pacific Northwest fall victim to one of hunting’s toxic legacies.For now, a small group of scientists and volunteers may be their only chance of survival.Reporting for our EarthFix team, Ken Christensen has the final story i…
 
Occasionally a big idea comes along that promises revolutionize the world – think about things like self-driving cars. For biologists – especially those who work with fish – the big idea involves something called “environmental DNA.” The technology could revolutionize how we protect native animals and ensure invasive species don’t take hold. Jes Bu…
 
Tens of thousands of birders all over North and Central America are participating right now in the Christmas Bird Count.This annual survey in the last weeks of December and first week of January documents what birds are where and how many of them there are.The count’s been running for over one hundred years.It’s given scientists loads of data about…
 
Salmon need cool, shady streams to thrive. Oregon was once at the forefront in protecting these waters, but these days, the state lags far behind Washington and California.Now, Oregon is updating how its rivers and streams are protected.Jes Burns of EarthFix partnered with Liam Moriarty of Jefferson Public Radio to find out if these new rules will …
 
Washington’s Olympic Peninsula is known as one of the quietest, most remote places in the United States. But that is changing. The Navy is ramping up troops and training in the Northwest - and the Olympic Peninsula is the epicenter of those activities. Ashley Ahearn brings us the next installment in our EarthFix series on the military’s relationshi…
 
This month [December 7th] will mark the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It’s what drew the United States into World War II. During that war, President Roosevelt called on America to be the “Arsenal of Democracy.” In Seattle, people did their part by building B-17 bombers.Thousands of these ‘Flying Fortresses’ blackened the skies ove…
 
After the Great Depression, the Northwest’s faltering timber industry got its second wind. The comeback started with World War II. The war effort created a huge demand for lumber. It also spurred advancements in technology, setting the region up for one of the largest timber harvests in U-S history. As part of our EarthFix series exploring at the i…
 
If you were to guess who is responsible for looking out for wildlife, you probably wouldn’t think of the army. Well, it turns out, more than 400 threatened or endangered species live on U.S. military land -- almost four times more than in our national parks. So how do we protect animals in dangerous places? EarthFix reporter Katie Campbell has the …
 
The Northwest timber industry has changed dramatically over the past few decades. In the wake of environmental regulations and lawsuits, logging has declined on federal lands. Automation has reduced the number of jobs in the mills and forests. And the economy and trade deals haven't always been favorable.But Donald Trump’s election win has communit…
 
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