show episodes
 
Join comedian Deborah Frances-White and her special guests as they discuss topics “all 21st century feminists agree on” while confessing their insecurities, hypocrisies and fears that underlie their lofty principles. Deborah Frances-White is the 2016 Writers' Guild Award Winner for Best Radio Comedy for her hit BBC Radio 4 series Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice. She is an Edinburgh Fringe regular, screenwriter and is hugely in demand for her corporate seminars.
 
'A Scottish Podcast' is a serialised modern audio drama. It chronicles the story of Lee, a washed up former radio DJ who launches a paranormal investigation podcast. Lee wants to see his show The Terror Files mentioned up there alongside podcasts like The Black Tapes, Limetown, and The Message. And he’ll stop at nothing to achieve it. Aided by his jaded musician pal Dougie, the pair travel the length and breadth of the country in search of Medieval Demon Kings and Lovecraftian Gods of the Se ...
 
Edinburgh Radio Is An Online Radio Station in The UK. We have loyal listeners in over 50 countries worldwide. We play all kinds of music, from Rock to Chart and Dance to R&B, and even support Unsigned bands and artists by playing their songs on air. Our website has a Facebook style chat room for listeners and DJ's to hang out together. So why not come and chill out at www.Edinburgh-Radio.com right now and chill out with our other listeners while listening to some of the best hits played on a ...
 
Dr Murray Collins and journalist Kim McAllister reveal why Edinburgh is on course to become the space data capital of Europe, in association with Picture Zero. From satellite data to space robots and even landing on comets - they interview experts from across Scotland. Professors, business leaders and students share insights from their work in space and satellite technology in Edinburgh and across the world. www.ed.ac.uk www.ed.ac.uk/bayes www.ddi.ac.uk Twitter.com/murraybcollins twitter.com ...
 
Rab Houston was born in Hamilton, Scotland, lived in India and Ghana and was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and St Andrews University before spending six years at Cambridge University as a research student (Peterhouse) and research fellow (Clare College). He has worked at the University of St Andrews since 1983 and is Professor of Modern History, specialising in British social history. He is a fellow of both the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Edinburgh (Scotland’s natio ...
 
Four different Doctor Who Podcasts from award winning comedian Toby Hadoke, whose Edinburgh show Moths Ate My Doctor Who Scarf became a West End hit, toured the world, and became a Sony nominated BBC Radio series. The podcasts are: Happy Times and Places - episode commentaries (a video version is also available on You Tube). Released weekly. Indefinable Magic - whimsical essays inspired by the show. Released at least once a month. Too Much Information - an episode-by-episode examination of t ...
 
When a young woman’s body is discovered in the Dunedin Town Belt, Louise Hepburn is haunted by both the case and her past. From Ōtepoti, the Edinburgh of the south, Prospect Park Productions NZ presents the multi-award-winning thriller, Dark Dunedin.
 
A series of lectures, inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, will highlight the University of Edinburgh’s internationally acclaimed medical research and show that keen detective work is still essential for 21st century doctors. Conan Doyle drew inspiration for Sherlock Holmes when he was a medical student at Edinburgh and based his character on the Professor of Medicine Joseph Bell, who was known for his meticulous attention to detail. The lectures will show that, just like Sherlock Holmes, tod ...
 
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show series
 
The Ottoman Syrians - residents of modern Syria and Lebanon - formed the first Arabic-speaking Evangelical Church in the region. Deanna Ferree Womack's book Protestants, Gender and the Arab Renaissance in Late Ottoman Syria (Edinburgh UP, 2020) offers a fresh narrative of the encounters of this minority Protestant community with American missionari…
 
Our bodies really matter to God; he made them perfectly. What we put into our body matters to God, how we care for our body matters to God, what we do with our body matters to God. What does it mean today to glorify God in our bodies? How can we love and care for our bodies well as an expression of worship to God?…
 
The 16 year campaign to have a safe cycle and walking route created from Drem to Gullane appears to have hit a wall. Easy Lothian Council suggest it will be another three years before they can start to build it. I met one of the campaigners,Iain Monk, who took me on a cycle along the proposed route to explain the plans in more detail. --- Send in a…
 
What Is Religious Authority?: Cultivating Islamic Communities in Indonesia (Princeton UP, 2021) by Ismail Fajrie Alatas draws on groundbreaking anthropological insights to provide a new understanding of Islamic religious authority, showing how religious leaders unite diverse aspects of life and contest differing Muslim perspectives to create distin…
 
Ben Railton's book Of Thee I Sing: The Contested History of American Patriotism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021) is a cogently written history of the idea of American patriotism. Railton argues that there are four distinct forms of patriotism as practiced in the United States (U.S.) including (1) celebratory, or the communal expression of an idealized …
 
A short and entertaining narrative of France from prehistory to the present, recounting the great events and personalities that helped create France’s cultural and political influence today. Country and destination, nation and idea, France has a rich and complex history that fascinates the world and attracts millions of visitors each year to its ch…
 
Political parties are taken for granted today, but how was the idea of party viewed in the eighteenth century, when core components of modern, representative politics were trialled? From Bolingbroke to Burke, political thinkers regarded party as a fundamental concept of politics, especially in the parliamentary system of Great Britain. The paradox …
 
The story of how the American military—and more particularly the regular army—has played a vital role in the late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century United States that extended beyond the battlefield is the focus of Robert Wooster’s The United States Army and the Making of America: From Confederation to Empire, 1775–1903 (University Press of Kansas…
 
Jennifer Holland (Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Susan Johnson (Harry Reid Endowed Chair, History of the Intermountain West, University of Las Vegas-Nevada) about Johnson’s recent book, Writing Kit Carson: Fallen Heroes in a Changing West (UNC Press, 2020). In this conversation, Susan Johnson addresses how some of the ques…
 
In her magnificent and lyrical new book, The Emperor Who Never Was: Dara Shukoh in Mughal India (Harvard UP, 2020), Supriya Gandhi reorients and adds unprecedented depth to our understanding of the much memorialized but less understood Mughal prince and thinker Dara Shukoh (d. 1659), and of his broader political and social milieu. Written with exce…
 
Slightly updated with a couple of "I Think You'll Find"s that weren't in the original episodic release, here is a chance to digest a whole three hours (nearly) of daft Dalek action with the delightful Darrell MacLaine in celebratory mode as he and your host Toby Hadoke try to identify Aridians, wonder why Columbo is on the Empire State Building, en…
 
What do we really know about how and where religions began, and how they spread? Robin Derricourt considers the birth and growth of several major religions, using history and archaeology to recreate the times, places and societies that witnessed the rise of significant monotheistic faiths. Beginning with Mormonism and working backwards through Isla…
 
Today I talked to Kevin McGruder about his new book Philip Payton: The Father of Black Harlem (Columbia UP, 2021) In a moment of hope, even faith, African-Americans inspired by Booker T. Washington believed at the start of the 21st century that prospering financially would lead them to fair and even-standing with their fellow white citizens in Amer…
 
Russia’s position between Europe and Asia has led to differing conceptions of “what Russia is” to its leaders. Russia’s vast holdings east of the Urals have often inspired those who led Russia to look eastward for national glory, whether through trade, soft power, or outright force. Yet these Russian “pivots to Asia” often ended soon after they beg…
 
“A map is the greatest of all epic poems, its lines and colors show the realization of great dreams.” --Gilbert Grosvenor The Great Game raged through the wilds of Central Asia during the nineteenth century, as Imperial Russia and Great Britain jostled for power. Tsarist armies gobbled up large tracts of Turkestan, advancing inexorably towards thei…
 
As projects like Manhattan's High Line, Chicago's 606, China's eco-cities, and Ethiopia's tree-planting efforts show, cities around the world are devoting serious resources to urban greening. Formerly neglected urban spaces and new high-end developments draw huge crowds thanks to the considerable efforts of city governments. But why are greening pr…
 
At a time when what it means to watch movies keeps changing, this book offers a case study that rethinks the institutional, ideological, and cultural role of film exhibition, demonstrating that film exhibition can produce meaning in itself apart from the films being shown. Cinema Off Screen: Moviegoing in Socialist China (U California Press, 2021) …
 
This is an important, revisionist account of the origins of the British Empire in Asia in the early modern period. In The Origins of the British Empire in Asia, 1600-1750 (Cambridge University Press, 2020), David Veevers uncovers a hidden world of transcultural interactions between servants of the English East India Company and the Asian communitie…
 
The realities of race that continue to plague the United States have direct ties to the anthropology. Anthropologists often imagine their discipline as inherently anti-racist and historically connected to social justice movements. But just how true is that? In Boasians at War: Anthropology, Race, and World War II (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) Anthony …
 
Rabbi Moses ben Nahman (1194–1270), known in English as Nahmanides and by the acronym the Ramban, was one of the most creative kabbalists, one of the deepest and most original biblical interpreters, and one of the greatest Talmudic scholars the Jewish tradition has ever produced. Join us as we talk with Moshe Halbertal about his recent book: Nahman…
 
When people think of Russian food, they generally think either of the opulent luxury of the tsarist aristocracy or of post-Soviet elites, signified above all by caviar, or on the other hand of poverty and hunger--of cabbage and potatoes and porridge. Both of these visions have a basis in reality, but both are incomplete. The history of food and dri…
 
Michal Kšiňan’s Milan Rastislav Štefánik: The Slovak National Hero and Co-Founder of Czechoslovakia is the first scientific biography of Milan Rastislav Štefánik (1880–1919) that is focused on analyzing the process of how he became the Slovak national hero. Although he is relatively unknown internationally, his contemporaries compared him “to Chode…
 
After a turbulent political revolt against the military superpower of the early modern world, the tiny Dutch Republic managed to situate itself as the dominant printing and book trading power of the European market. The so-called Dutch Golden Age has long captured the attention of art historians, but for every one painting produced by the Dutch dur…
 
Constitutional Investigations is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Linda Colley, the Shelby M.C. Davis 1958 Professor of History at Princeton University. Linda Colley is a leading expert on British, imperial and global history since 1700. After inspiring insights about Linda Colley’s teachers and professors who had …
 
From the early twentieth century until the 1960s, Maine led the nation in paper production. The state could have earned a reputation as the Detroit of paper production, however, the industry eventually slid toward failure. What happened? Shredding Paper unwraps the changing US political economy since 1960, uncovers how the paper industry defined an…
 
After over a decade of king-less government, civil war, and political and religious revolution, the restoration of the Stuart monarchy created a complex situation for those religious dissenters who had enjoyed a brief period of political freedom outside the English church. In The Culture of Dissent in Restoration England: 'The Wonders of the Lord' …
 
Olga Tufnell (1905–85) was a British archaeologist working in Egypt, Cyprus, and Palestine in the 1920s and 1930s, a period often described as a golden age of archaeological discovery. Tufnell achieved extraordinary success for an “amateur” archaeologist and as a woman during a time when the field of professional archaeology was heavily dominated b…
 
The Guilty FeministPresented by Deborah Frances-White and Alison Spittle Episode 264: Rootswith special guest Ola Labib Recorded 7 July 2021 via Zoom. Released 26 July 2021. The Power of Storytelling: Wednesday 28 July, 2:00pmUse offer code “GUILTFEMPOD” for £20 off https://www.the-spontaneity-shop.com/training-courses/open-workshops/ The Guilty Fe…
 
Jeffrey Jenkins and Justin Peck’s new book Congress and the First Civil Rights Era, 1861-1918 (U Chicago Press, 2021) explores how Congressional Republicans enacted laws aimed at establishing an inclusive, multiracial democracy. During the Civil War and Reconstruction, Congress crafted a civil rights agenda -- including laws, strict enforcement mec…
 
Historian Eszter Varsa’s new book Protected Children, Regulated Mothers: Gender and the 'Gypsy Question' in State Care in Postwar Hungary, 1949–1956 (Central European UP, 2020) examines child protection in Stalinist Hungary as a part of twentieth-century East Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European history. Across the communist bloc, the prewar…
 
Adam Lee Cilli's book Canaan, Dim and Far: Black Reformers and the Pursuit of Citizenship in Pittsburgh, 1915-1945 (U Georgia Press, 2021) is an assiduously researched book about the activism of African American reformers and migrants in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1915 to 1945. Adam Cilli argues that Pittsburgh is central to the story of the Bla…
 
In a world that purports to know more about the future than any before it, why do we still need speculation? Insubstantial speculations – from utopian thinking to high-risk stock gambles – often provoke backlash, even when they prove prophetic. Why does this hypothetical way of thinking generate such controversy? Gayle Rogers, author of Speculation…
 
No Future in This Country: The Prophetic Pessimism of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner (U Mississippi Press, 2020) is a history of the career of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner (1834–1915), specifically focusing on his work from 1896 to 1915. Drawing on the copious amount of material from Turner’s speeches, editorial, and open and private letters, Dr. Andre E…
 
Welcome to Dane Baptiste Questions Everything, a podcast where comedian Dane Baptiste, producer Howard Cohen and a special guest take turns posing questions that just need answering. This is episode 120 and we spoke to comedian and broadcaster Loyiso Gola about learning from the pandemic, educating racists and space travel companions. Please rate a…
 
It actually is cricket - a meander through the connections between Doctor Who and a sport with a long, sprawling history, one that inspires devotion in some and bafflement in others, is associated with a certain British eccentricity, and has a symbiotic relationship with BBC broadcasting. What is less well known is that cricket itself was been kill…
 
Embracing Complexity is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and eminent historian David Cannadine, Princeton University. This thoughtful conversation includes an examination of different aspects of the societal role of both history and historians while rejecting the simplifying distortions of the historical record that we…
 
In The Devil's Historians: How Modern Extremists Abuse the Medieval Past (University of Toronto Press, 2020), Amy S. Kaufman and Paul B. Sturtevant examine the many ways in which the medieval past has been manipulated to promote discrimination, oppression, and murder. Tracing the fetish for “medieval times” behind toxic ideologies like nationalism,…
 
Jyoti Gulati Balachandran's Narrative Pasts: The Making of a Muslim Community in Gujarat, c. 1400-1650 (Oxford University Press, 2020) explores the complex power of Sufi texts in creating Muslim communities in Gujarat from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Balachandran focuses on three main Sufi saints, including Ahmad Khattu, whose disci…
 
The city that sits on the River Foyle on the North side of the Irish isle in many ways has stood as a microcosm of the conflicts in Northern Ireland, even to the contestation over the name of Derry/Londonderry. In Derry City: Memory and Political Struggle in Northern Ireland (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020), Margo Shea examines the popular an…
 
Three episodes in one week? Makes you sound... well, very lucky. It's three episodes of Time and the Rani though, so can you learn to be like your host, Toby Hadoke, and vow to try to love this rather strange matter? He's accentuating the positive because since recording their contribution to this podcast, special guest Anthony Townsend has receive…
 
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