show episodes
 
Wedding Photography Podcast is a weekly podcast (every Thursday) providing business tips, inspiration, and lessons learned to help wedding photographers go full-time and become successful. It's hosted by Henry Chen of Aevitas Weddings, a wedding photographer based out of Los Angeles with a decade of experience photographing over 400 weddings.
 
In each episode of The Robot Brains podcast, renowned artificial intelligence researcher, professor and entrepreneur Pieter Abbeel meets the brilliant minds attempting to build robots with brains. Pieter is joined by leading experts in AI Robotics from all over the world as he explores how far humanity has come in its mission to create conscious computers, mindful machines and rational robots. Host: Pieter Abbeel | Executive Producers: Ricardo Reyes & Henry Tobias Jones | Audio Production: K ...
 
—a podcast where curiosity and imagination run free. Imagine if you wake up one day to find a completely different world. Animals and plants you are familiar with are replaced by strange ones. The air smells and tastes different. Each episode, we will explore our world with an imaginary item or without a familiar one. You can participate by leaving your imagination via voice at http://anchor.fm/ourworldofimagination or (717) 804-4297. Let me know if you would like your voicemail played on th ...
 
Each week WFMT goes live to the Chicago Cultural Center for concerts with emerging artists from around the world, produced by the International Music Foundation. Some shows offer solo recitals while others feature ensembles. The concerts take place beneath the world’s largest Tiffany-domed ceiling, part of a landmark building that originally housed the Chicago Public Library. The Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts are named for British pianist Myra Hess who organized some 1,700 free lunchtime ...
 
The annual student-run Foreign Affairs Symposium at The Johns Hopkins University is returning to the Homewood campus this month, with several prominent speakers scheduled to appear during the spring semester under the theme, “From the Front Line to the Bottom Line.” All of the events are free and open to the public and take place at 8 p.m. in Shriver Hall Auditorium on their appointed dates. Each lecture is followed by a reception with the speaker and a book signing, if applicable. Retired G ...
 
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show series
 
In episode 17 of our host Pieter Abbeel meets Peter Puchwein. Peter is the Vice President of Innovation at KNAPP, one of the world market leaders in warehouse logistics and automation. During their interview Pieter and Peter discuss the many ways that KNAPP has "innovation" in its DNA: from the company's forward-thinking founder Gunter Knapp back i…
 
In Ep.16 of The Robot Brains Podcast, Pieter Abbeel sits down with AMP Robotics CEO and founder, Matanya Horowitz. Matanya is the founder and CEO of AMP Robotics, an industrial AI robotics company using automation to modernize recycling. An estimated $200bn worth of recyclable materials go un-recycled by municipal waste centres around the world. AM…
 
On Episode 15 of The Robot Brains Podcast, Pieter Abbeel is joined by Anca Dragan. Anca is a professor at UC Berkeley, where she is the director of the Interact Lab where she is working on the goal of enabling robots to work with, around, and in support of people. Because of her success in the field, Forbes magazine dubbed Anca: "the woman teaching…
 
Socialist projects of the 20th century were the target of murderous campaigns originating in the global north. Hundreds of thousands of people were killed... but they aren't the ones getting a monument in Ottawa. A discussion with Harbinger Society Presents and Habibti Please Podcast
 
In episode 14 of The Robot Brains Podcast we sit down and chat with Mike Volpi of Index Ventures. Index is one of the largest and best known VC firms in Silicon Valley. Mike joined Index Ventures in 2009, helping to establish the firm's San Francisco office which has become one of the largest parts of their business today. Mike invests primarily in…
 
Mahjong: many have played the game, but few are familiar with its rich and complex history. In Mahjong: A Chinese Game and the Making of Modern American Culture (Oxford University Press, 2021), Annelise Heinz (University of Oregon) follows this beloved pastime from the International Settlement in Shanghai, to the detention facilities on Angel Islan…
 
In episode thirteen of The Robot Brains Podcast we meet Mary "Missy" Cummings, former US Airforce fighter pilot and Professor at the Duke University Pratt School of Engineering. Missy tells us her incredible story moving from the theatre of war to the laboratories of computer sciences and explains how she became one of the chief proponents in the m…
 
Based on longitudinal ethnographic work on migration between the United States and Taiwan, Time and Migration: How Long-Term Taiwanese Migrants Negotiate Later Life (Cornell UP, 2021) interrogates how long-term immigrants negotiate their needs as they grow older and how transnational migration shapes later-life transitions. Ken Chih-Yan Sun develop…
 
Isabel Rosario Cooper, if mentioned at all by mainstream history books, is often a salacious footnote: the young Filipino mistress of General Douglas MacArthur, hidden away at the Charleston Hotel in DC. Empire’s Mistress, Starring Isabel Rosario Cooper (Duke University Press: 2021) by Professor Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez refuses to reduce Cooper’s…
 
In Unstable Masks: Whiteness and American Superhero Comics (Ohio State UP, 2020), Sean Guynes and Martin Lund have assembled more than fifteen chapters that interrogate our thinking about superheroes, especially those written and created in the United States, and how those heroes participate in reifying the whiteness of American politics, culture, …
 
In episode twelve of The Robot Brains Podcast we are joined by Charles Isbell Jr, professor and Dean of the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. After starting his career as an industrial researcher at the legendary Bell Labs, and a long research career in Interactive and Human-Centric AI, Charles has more recently turned hi…
 
In episode eleven of The Robot Brains Podcast we are joined by Alison Gopnik, professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and author of the "Mind and Matter" science column for the Wall Street Journal. She has written numerous books about developmental psychology and researching the ways children learn. Her TED Talk: "What do babies think?" has been see…
 
Episode ten of The Robot Brains Podcast investigates how hedge funds are using AI to find competitive advantages for their investments. Joining us to explain how AI is starting to be used for pure profit is Mike Schuster Managing Director and Head of AI Core Team at the New York-based Financial Sciences firm: Two Sigma. With decades of experience w…
 
This is the second episode of a four-part series featuring the winners and honorable mentions of the 2021 Book Awards for the Association of Asian American Studies. This episode features two of the winners in Creative Writing: Poetry: Benjamín Naka-Hasebe Kingsley, whose poetry collection Colonize Me explores the lives of those communities and peop…
 
Duo Dotto-Cho performs music by Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann, and Johannes Brahms live from the Chicago Cultural Center. Arianna Dotto, violin Hyejin Cho, piano Born in Chicago and raised in Milan, Italy, violinist Arianna Dotto has performed across the U.S.A., Italy, France, Switzerland, Belgium, and Germany, including at Carnegie “Weill” Recit…
 
In the latest episode of The Robot Brains Podcast, we meet Graphcore's CTO, EVP of engineering and co-founder, Simon Knowles. Simon has had a long and illustrious career creating computer processors that have been used all over the world and in practically every industry. At Graphcore, he and his team have created the IPU, the world's first compute…
 
Balut is a fertilized chicken or duck egg that is boiled at the seventeenth day and sold as a common street snack in the Philippines. While it is widely eaten in the Filipino community, balut is frequently used in eating “challenges” on American reality TV shows. At seventeen days, the balut egg already contains a partially developed embryo, and th…
 
In episode seven of The Robot Brains Podcast, our guest is Covariant CEO and co-founder Peter Chen. Peter is one of Pieter Abbeel's closest collaborators for the past five years, with Peter having studied for his PhD in Pieter's lab in Berkley before then working together at OpenAI. Now they are co-founders of Covariant, which they started back in …
 
This episode will be the first of a four-part series featuring the winners and honorable mentions of the 2021 Book Awards for the Association of Asian American Studies. Since 1987, the book awards at the annual Asian American Studies Association conference (or AAAS) has given valuable attention onto the works in Asian American Studies that have bee…
 
In episode seven of The Robot Brains Podcast, our guest is ABB's Marc Segura. Marc is the Managing Director of consumer segments and service robotics at ABB. Founded in 1988, ABB is one of the largest producers and installers of robots around the world and Marc has been leading the charge on many of the company's efforts for 20+ years. He has seen …
 
The cultural landscape plays a momentous role in the transmission of Christianity. Consequently, the global expansion of the church has led to the increasing diversification of world Christianity. As a result, scholars are turning more and more to native cultures as the point of focus. Understanding Korean Christianity: Grassroot Perspectives on Ca…
 
In episode six of The Robot Brains Podcast, Pieter is joined by Keenan Wyrobek, co-founder and head of product and engineering at Zipline. Founded in 2014, Zipline is an on-demand drone delivery service using cutting-edge drone engineering and AI to deliver urgent medical products. In our chat Keenan talks about his youth tearing down his school's …
 
How do we understand our contemporary politics of race in historical, economical, and political context? How do we make sense of the Chinese Exclusion acts and ongoing racial discrimination? In Ghosts of Gold Mountain: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad (HMH, 2019), Dr. Gordon H. Chang recovers the history of how …
 
Azusa Tashiro, violin 1 Elizabeth Huffman, violin 2 Amanda Grimm, viola Jacob Hanegan, cello Azusa Tashiro, violin 1 Azusa Tashiro is Concertmaster for Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra (IPO) and is originally from Chiba, Japan. She started playing violin at the age of 4 and continued her studies at the Toho School of Music and DePaul University, whe…
 
In episode five of The Robot Brains Podcast we are exploring AI robotics in healthcare. We chat with Andrea Thomaz, the co-founder and CEO of Diligent Robotics and Professor at UT Austin. In our interview, Andrea talks about her hospital helper AI-robot: Moxi, which is already being used to help frontline medical clinicians and care workers with th…
 
In Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future: Kanaka Maoli and Critical Settler Cartographies in Hawai'i (Duke University Press, 2021), Candace Fujikane draws upon Hawaiian stories about the land and water and their impact upon Native Hawai'ian struggles to argue that Native economies of abundance provide a foundation for collective work against cli…
 
What is possible, politically? When are we being too idealistic? What is “realistic,” when we talk about social change? Is non-violent revolution possible? In this episode, I speak with journalist Vincent Bevins, author of The Jakarta Method, about the mass killings of suspected communists and ethnic Chinese in Indonesia during the 1960s and other …
 
In episode four of The Robot Brains Podcast we meet Cade Metz, technology correspondent for the New York Times and the author Genius Makers: The Mavericks who brought AI to Google, Facebook and the world. In our interview, Cade and Pieter discusses the history of AI from the perspective of the brilliant academic and business minds who helped to inv…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@…
 
On episode three of The Robot Brains Podcast we have deep learning pioneer: Yann LeCun. Yann is a winner of the Turing Award (often called the Nobel Prize of Computer Science) who in 2013 was handpicked by Mark Zuckerberg to bring AI to Facebook. Yann also offers his predictions for the future of artificial general intelligence, talks about his lif…
 
This episode features three interviews with organizers and scholars concerned with Asian migrant sex work: SWAN Vancouver (Alison Clancey and Kelly Go), Dr. Lily Wong, and Dr. Yuri Doolan. On March 16, 2021, Robert Aaron Long targeted three Atlanta-area spas and massage parlors and killed eight people: Delania Ashley Yuan González, Xiaojie Tan, Dao…
 
Abraham Feder, cello, and Cheryl Feder, harp, perform works of J.S. Bach, Johann Strauss, Henriette Renié, and Castelnuovo-Tedesco live for this Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert. *On-demand audio featured on this site may have been edited in order to comply with U.S. copyright regulations. The post Feder Duo appeared first on WFMT.…
 
This week's guest is Princeton professor and co-founder of AI4All, Olga Russakovsky. Olga's research has focused on the societal biases in the data used to train machine learning AI. In our second episode, she talks about why we need more diversity in AI, problematic junk in, junk out data sets and what it was like being the only female researcher …
 
This live Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert features works by Paul Hindemith and Rebecca Clarke performed by Beatrice Chen and Kuang-Hao Huang. Beatrice Chen currently studies at the Curtis Institute of Music with Hsin-Yun Huang. She’s won first prize in various competitions including the Johansen International Competition for Young String Players, A…
 
On the first ever episode of The Robot Brains podcast, our host Pieter Abbeel sits down with Andrej Karpathy, director of AI at Tesla. Andrej is a world-leading expert when it comes to machine learning and training neural nets. In this episode he talks about what it's like working with Elon Musk, training driverless cars with machine learning and t…
 
The Civic Orchestra of Chicago String Quartet performs works by Chevalier de Saint-Georges, Rebecca Clarke, and Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel live from the Chicago Cultural Center. Joy Curtain and Genevieve Smelser, violins Benjamin Wagner, viola Najette Abouelhadi, cello The post Civic Orchestra of Chicago String Quartet appeared first on WFMT.…
 
The Case for Identity Politics: Polarization, Demographic Change, and Racial Appeals (University of Virginia Press, 2020) dives into the discussion and debate surrounding the 2016 primary and how Donald Trump was ultimately nominated by the Republican Party to be their standard bearer and then elected president. But this is not the center of the bo…
 
This program features music by Mel Bonis and Carl Reinecke performed by Emma Gerstein, flute; Alexander Love, horn; and Winston Choi, piano. Emma Gerstein is second flute of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. She was appointed to the post in 2017 by Music Director Riccardo Muti. Before her appointment to the CSO, she appeared with the Orchestra as a g…
 
In this inaugural episode, we discuss a unique special issue of The Journal of Asian American Studies: #WeToo, a reader of Art, Poetry, Fiction, and Memoir, that seeks to answer the question, “What does sexual violence look like in the lives of those hailed as “model minority?” Intended as a reader for the college classroom, the #WeToo special issu…
 
Many scholars have interrogated the incarceration of 120,000 Japanese-Americans during WWII – with an eye to understanding the particular type of racism that allowed the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt to punish based on heritage rather than any particular action or crime. Bradford Pearson’s new book The Eagles of Heart Mountain: A True Sto…
 
In the spring of 1942, the United States government forced 120,000 Japanese Americans from their homes in California, Oregon, Washington, and Arizona and sent them to incarceration camps across the West. Nearly 14,000 of them landed on the outskirts of Cody, Wyoming, at the base of Heart Mountain. Behind barbed wire fences, they faced racism, cruel…
 
Here is a recent conversation I had with two young researchers, Agha Saadaf and Amber Ye, who are both about to finish their undergraduate degrees in anthropology at the University of Toronto - my alma mater. They reached out to interview me for the Anthropology Undergraduate Journal, for which they are both editors. We talked about my time at u of…
 
Violinist John Macfarlane and pianist Victor Asunción play music by Richard Strauss and Giuseppe Tartini live from the Chicago Cultural Center. John Macfarlane is Assistant Principal Second Violin of the Lyric Opera Orchestra. He has performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, Grant Park M…
 
Cellist Cora Swenson Lee and pianist Claire-Chung Lim present a program with music by Amy Beach, Ethel Smyth, and Luise Adolpha Le Beau on this live Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert. Praised by the San Francisco Classical Voice for playing “with maturity and panache,” Dr. Cora Swenson Lee is a cellist and baroque cellist who performs actively around…
 
As right-wing nationalism and authoritarian populism gain momentum across the world, liberals, and even some conservatives, worry that democratic principles are under threat. In The Spectre of Race: How Discrimination Haunts Western Democracy (Princeton UP, 2018), Michael Hanchard argues that the current rise in xenophobia and racist rhetoric is no…
 
This unique episode features a dual/duel interview with two authors whose recent books focus on the overlapping contexts and theories of Game Studies and Asian American Studies. The first is Tara Fickle and her book The Race Card: From Gaming Technologies to Model Minorities (NYU Press, 2019), which investigates the ways Asian Americans have had to…
 
Intertwining autobiography and ethnography, Clara Han’s touching new book Seeing Like a Child: Inheriting the Korean War (Fordham University Press, 2020) asks how scholarship can be transformed from a child’s perspective. Through a critique of anthropological practices that assume fully formed “I” in its emphasis on self-reflexivity as well as the …
 
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