show episodes
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. Each episode of Ipse Dixit features a different guest discussing their scholarship. The podcast also features several special series. "From the Archives" consists historical recordings potentially of interest to legal scholars and lawyers. "The Homicide Squad" consists of investigations of the true stories behind different murder ballads, as well as examples of how different musicians have interpreted the song over time. "The Day Antitrust Died?" ...
 
Irrational Basis Review: a constitutional law podcast that’s rationally related to a legitimate educational purpose. We'll provide deep dives about the constitutional law cases that are foundational to the first year law school curriculum. For professors, law students, and anyone interested in law! Hosted by Leah Litman, Melissa Murray, and Kate Shaw. Produced by Melody Rowell.
 
Faith & Politics is a podcast of the South Dakota Catholic Conference. Join Executive Director Chris Motz, Esq. as he and his guests explore a variety of contemporary civic issues through the lens of a classical Catholic moral and ethical framework. Winsome and robust, Faith & Politics ranges from the soul to the state as it seeks to cultivate thoughtful criteria for governing well in the 21st century.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Professor Jutta Brunnée, University of Toronto, gives a talk for the seminar series on 6th May 2021. Drawing on the practice-turn in constructivism and in international relations (IR) theory more generally, I will argue that a particular approach to managing stability and change is inherent in, and indeed characteristic of, legality in internationa…
 
On this episode, Chris is joined by Fr. Justin Brophy, O.P., professor of political science at Providence College, Rhode Island. In a short diagnosis of our present moment as Americans, Fr. Brophy points to (among other points not discussed) a tension between Lockean individualism and a Puritan ethic, and a decline in our traditional institutions a…
 
In this episode, Ashley T. Rubin, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, discusses her new book, "Rocking Qualitative Social Science: An Irreverent Guide to Rigorous Research," which is published by Stanford University Press. Rubin begins by explaining what qualitative research is, how it differs from quantitative r…
 
In this episode, Lee Montgomery, Associate Professor of Experimental Art and Technology at the University of New Mexico, discusses the intersection of artistic practice and the law. Among other things, he describes his Neighborhood Public Radio project, which was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial, and its reception by National Public Radio. He …
 
In this episode, Eric J. Segall, Ashe Family Chair Professor of Law at Georgia State University College of Law, discusses his forthcoming essay "John Roberts: Hubris-in-Chief." Segall reflects on the tension between Chief Justice Roberts's reputation as an institutionalist and the radical positions he has taken in many cases. He argues that this re…
 
In this episode, Zachary D. Kaufman, Associate Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of Houston Law Center, discusses his article "Digital Age Samaritans," which is published in the Boston College Law Review. Kaufman begins by describing "bad samaritan" laws that impose liability on certain people who fail to report crimes or oth…
 
In this episode, Anthony Moffa, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law, discusses his articles, "Word Limited: An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship Between the Length, Resiliency, and Impact of Federal Regulations" and "Strength In Numbers (of Words): Empirical Analysis of Preambles and Public Comments," both of wh…
 
In 1986, the American economist, political scientist and cognitive psychologist Herbert Simon published "Rationality in Psychology and Economics" in the Journal of Business. Continuing with Simon's critique of neoclassical assumptions of economic behavior, Simon asserts that the standard of rationality used in neoclassical economic analysis is insu…
 
In 1991, the American economist, political scientist and cognitive psychologist Herbert Simon published "Organizations and Markets" in the Journal of Economic Perspectives. It provides a critique of neoclassical and new institutional economic assumptions of organizational behavior. "Research into the decision-making process within economic organiza…
 
In this episode, Christine Abely, faculty fellow at New England Law Boston, discusses her article "E-Commerce Transactions and Country of Origin Marking for Imported Products: A Gap Between Statutory Purpose and Legal Requirements," which is published in the Virginia Journal of International Law. Abely describes the history of country of origin des…
 
On this episode, Chris is joined by Kat Talalas, the associate director for communications at the Secretariat for Pro-Life Activities at the USCCB. For those who haven't been closely following the debate over the Hyde Amendment, and its enormously significant consequences even at the state level, Kat brings us all up to speed with what it is, why i…
 
In this episode, Joan Howarth, Distinguished Visiting Professor at University of Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law and Dean Emerita of Michigan State University College of Law, discusses her article "First and Last Chance: Looking for Lesbians in Fifties Bar Cases," which is published in the Souther California Review of Law and Women's Studie…
 
In this episode, Bernard Sharfman and Vincent Deluard discuss their article, "How Discretionary Decision-Making Has Created Performance and Legal Disclosure Issues for the S&P 500 Index." Bernard Sharfman is a Senior Corporate Governance Fellow at the RealClearFoundation, a member of the Journal of Corporation Law’s editorial advisory board, and a …
 
Chris is joined by Dale Bartscher, executive director of South Dakota Right to Life, to discuss the state Department of Health's annual abortion report, published on July 1. They also recap the 2020 pro-life bills that went into effect on July 1, talk about potential future legislation, and preview SDRTL's fall convention, which commemorates 50 yea…
 
In Exodus 26–31, Moses is on the mountain talking with God. While that was happening, what were God’s people up to? In this episode of Bible Talk, Alex Duke chats with Jim Hamilton and Sam Emadi about Exodus 32–33, in which God’s people “worship” God in terribly destructive ways.By 9Marks
 
Chris is joined by Jeff Wald, a Minnesota-based lawyer and writer (but who is quick to tell us he's a North Dakotan). Jeff shares about his and his wife Jackie's journey with adoption and foster parenting, the result of a call they discerned together to give of themselves to the poor and marginalized. At the heart of this adventure, for Jeff, is a …
 
When we get to Exodus 26–31, we’re tempted to let our eyes glaze over what seems to be an overly long list of the Tabernacle furniture and its accompanying details. In this episode of Bible Talk, Alex Duke chats with Jim Hamilton and Sam Emadi what these chapters tell us and why we as Christians should care about them.…
 
Host Chris Motz is joined this week by Dr. Chad Pecknold, professor of theology at Catholic University of America (and prolific tweeter -- @ccpecknold). Chris tosses a listener question to the good professor: What, according to the Church, is the purpose of government? What's it's aim, its end, its goal? Also, what are the limits of its action? Or,…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login