show episodes
 
The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world.
 
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AirSpace

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AirSpace

National Air and Space Museum

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The National Air and Space Museum contains the largest and most significant collection of air- and spacecraft in the world. Behind those amazing machines are thousands of stories of human achievement, failure, and perseverance. Join Emily, Matt, and Nick as they demystify one of the world’s most visited museums and explore why people are so fascinated with stories of exploration, innovation, and discovery.
 
This is The Supermassive Podcast from the Royal Astronomical Society. Every month, science journalist Izzie Clarke and astrophysicist Dr Becky Smethurst take you through the universe with the latest research, history from the society’s archives and astronomy you can do from your own home. You can send your questions to the team via podcast@ras.ac.uk or tweet @RoyalAstroSoc using #RASSupermassive The Supermassive Podcast is a Boffin Media Production by Izzie Clarke and Richard Hollingham.
 
New episodes come out every Wednesday for free, with 1-week early access for Wondery+ subscribers. The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Li ...
 
Volcanoes. Trees. Drunk butterflies. Mars missions. Slug sex. Death. Beauty standards. Anxiety busters. Beer science. Bee drama. Take away a pocket full of science knowledge and charming, bizarre stories about what fuels these professional -ologists' obsessions. Humorist and science correspondent Alie Ward asks smart people stupid questions and the answers might change your life.
 
Did you know that Europeans used to believe that sheep grew from Mongolian trees? Have you heard about the misbegotten discovery of a new form of water in the 1960s that set off a cold war arms race? Ever seen the gleaming Las Vegas hotel that accidentally shoots heat rays at poolside guests? The Constant is an audio history of getting things wrong. From ancient science to contemporary blunders, we take you on journeys of misadventure and misapprehension, filling your brain with juicy nugget ...
 
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Sidedoor

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Sidedoor

Smithsonian Institution

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More than 154 million treasures fill the Smithsonian’s vaults. But where the public’s view ends, Sidedoor begins. With the help of biologists, artists, historians, archaeologists, zookeepers and astrophysicists, host Lizzie Peabody sneaks listeners through the Smithsonian’s side door, telling stories that can’t be heard anywhere else. Check out si.edu/sidedoor and follow @SidedoorPod for more info.
 
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Nature Podcast

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Nature Podcast

Springer Nature Limited

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The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
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The Michigan DNR's Wildtalk Podcast

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The Michigan DNR's Wildtalk Podcast

Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division

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The Wildtalk Podcast is a production of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division. On the Wildtalk Podcast, representatives of the Wildlife Division chew the fat and shoot the scat about all things habitat, feathers, and fur. With insights, interviews, and listener questions answered on the air, you'll come away with a better picture of what's happening in the world of Michigan's wildlife. Thank you for listening.Email questions to:dnr-wildlife@michigan.govor call 517-28 ...
 
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Cosmopod

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Cosmopod

Cosmonaut Magazine

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Cosmopod is the official podcast of Cosmonaut Magazine, a project dedicated to expanding the project of scientific socialism in the 21st Century. In our feed we have a combination of podcast episodes and audio articles from our website.
 
The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
Hi there...welcome to Mushroom Hour. Listen in as we venture into kingdom fungi with unique and beautiful humans who all share a passion for mushrooms. We'll go forage for wild mushrooms, explore their potency as nature's medicines, become citizen mycologists, transform human consciousness and learn how mushrooms inspired art, spirituality and culture throughout our history. There are so many ways that mushrooms can benefit (wo)mankind - we just need to tap into the mycelium network and let ...
 
The Confessionals is where witnesses of the unexplained share their stories and encounters with the world. Through long-form conversations, we pull out as much detail about one's experience as possible. Join us as we delve into the unknown side of life, from bigfoot to UFOs to paranormal activity to even conspiracies.
 
Nine Days in July is a new podcast documentary series that explores each of the nine days of the Apollo 11 Mission, day by day, in nine 60-minute-long episodes. While telling the story of the mission to the moon as it occurs, we also spin back, and spin out, into stories about Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins, NASA, the Space Race, and the history of the world-at-large during those 9 Days in July.
 
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The Insight

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The Insight

Insitome: Your guide to the story of you

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Where did we come from? One of humanity's most basic questions, the answer is fascinating. Weaving together insights from the fields of genetics, archaeology, linguistics, and paleoanthropology, hosts Spencer Wells and Razib Khan take us on a grand tour of human history. Scientific storytelling at its best.
 
The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discovery and have witnessed both great triumphs and miserable defeats. As a planetary litmus paper it is at the poles we can detect the effects of natural oscillations and human activities on the global ecosystems.
 
80 Days is a podcast dedicated to exploring little-known countries, territories settlements and cities around the world. We're part history podcast, part geography podcast and part ramble. Each episode, we'll land in a new locale and spend some time discussing the history, geography, culture, sport, religion, industry, pastimes and music of our new location. More details on www.80dayspodcast.com, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram @80dayspodcast | Support us on www.patreon.com/80dayspodcast
 
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In The Better Angels of Our Nature Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker argued that modern history has witnessed a dramatic decline in human violence of every kind, and that in the present we are experiencing the most peaceful time in human history. But what do top historians think about Pinker's reading of the past? Does his argument stand up to his…
 
The phrase, “state of nature”, has been used over centuries to describe the uncultivated state of lands and animals, nudity, innocence, heaven and hell, interstate relations, and the locus of pre- and supra-political rights, such as the right to resistance, to property, to create and leave polities, and the freedom of religion, speech, and opinion,…
 
(Sep 30, 2021) Martha Foley has never succeeded in keeping a nature journal long-term, but Curt Stager finds them invaluable in his work. He records his observations on paper, but also finds great data through researching the journals of past observers, from Samuel de Champlain to Thomas Jefferson, to ordinary little-known North Country folk. His h…
 
Watch this on video | Buy us a coffee: Chris / Henry / Mario On today's Polar Newsreel: Russia aims for year-round shipping on the Northern Sea Route in 2022 or 2023 to go from about 1/10th to 1/3rd of the Panama Canal shipping volume. Sign the petition and help protect Antarctica by adding your name to the Call On CCAMLR petition to protect Antarc…
 
A long story, made short, and then long again, is finally ready to end. Join us for part three, the story of one guy who singlehandedly solved the most difficult problem in human history. Sort of. Kinda. Not really. But a little bit! If you enjoyed this saga, give Dava Sobel's Longitude a read. Continue your education via University of California I…
 
In Episode 383: A Trucker’s Bigfoot Property, we are joined by Dylin who has had creatures on his property since he was a child. The land he lived on was passed down through his family for generations, and what lived in the woods was not spoken about until there was a reason to speak of them. Dylin recalls three separate occasions in his childhood …
 
On Dec. 1, 1948, beachgoers came across a dead man on Australia’s Somerton beach. Well-dressed, and with no signs of trauma, his identity and cause of death eluded local police. Soon, investigators dubbed him the “Somerton Man.” It looked as though he’d simply laid down for a rest and died peacefully in his sleep. But when police arrived and began …
 
A would-by spy is caught by the FBI, attempting to trade nuclear secrets for cryptocurrency via a peanut butter sandwich. A Canadian principal sparks controversy with her Iron Maiden t-shirt. New York announces plans to gas the subways as a way to learn more about how bioweapons might disperse underground. All this and more in this week's Strange N…
 
Hundreds of scientists have responded to a survey asking about harassment and abuse during the pandemic. The results paint a picture which is as concerning as it is shocking. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss the kinds of abuse scientists are facing, try to pick apart where it is comes from and ask what can be done about it? News Feature: ‘I …
 
Rudy joins Roxy and Jack for a discussion on the past, present and future of the Australian state. We talk about the history of Australian colonization with its differences and similarities with US and Canada, the squatter vanguard of settler-colonialism, the failed attempt at a bourgeois revolution that was the Eureka Stockade and the process of F…
 
One of the fifty most influential living philosophers, a “self-promoting charlatan” (Brian Leiter), and the orchestrator of an “online orgy of stupidity” (Ray Brassier). In Skirmishes: With Friends, Enemies, and Neutrals (Punctum Books, 2020), Graham Harman responds with flair and wit to some of his best-known critics and fellow travelers. Pulling …
 
Audio: Paris Catacombs https://media.blubrry.com/80_days_an_exploration/content.blubrry.com/80_days_an_exploration/80_Days-Paris_Catacombs.mp3 In this episode of 80 Days: An Exploration Podcast, we’ll be talking about Paris, or rather, what lies underneath it — The Paris Catacombs. What began as a network of mines beneath the city which spanned app…
 
The Wild Hunt is a band of ghost warriors, witches or demons that stalk through the dark nights of Europe. But where do these tales originate? The answer might be more varied than you expect. This is a bonus episode for October that will be part of the Aloreing Podcast's Hallowe'en playlist. This playlist that will be updated through October and wi…
 
In 1803 John Sevier was the governor of the state of Tennessee and Andrew Jackson was a Superior Court judge, both in Knoxville. They were also bitter political rivals. One day the two met on the steps of the Knox County Courthouse and began an argument that turned into a fist fight and challenges from both men to the other to settle matters with a…
 
15-year-old Leah Freeman's body was discovered near her hometown of Coquille, Oregon, in 2000, and her former high school boyfriend Nick McGuffin was convicted of the murder. However, a reexamination of the case uncovered new evidence that ultimately led to McGuffin being released to prison -- and raising a new, disturbing question: Who actually mu…
 
Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O’Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O’Neill’s path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant’s philosoph…
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
Nick asks his fellow Conspiracy Realists for help explaining mysterious handprints. Becky asks why more people aren't talking about the death of Winston Smith. Ben continues his obsession with your ghost stories, and, in a rare personal moment, shares the story of a bizarre encounter somewhere in the rural Gulf Coast. All this and more in this week…
 
In this week’s Unsupervised Learning Podcast, Razib is joined by author and psycholinguist Steven Pinker to discuss his new book Rationality: what is it, why it seems scarce, and why it matters. Pinker makes the case the humans are fundamentally rational beings, and that it’s this capacity that has allowed Homo sapiens to spread across the planet a…
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
The neurons behind acupuncture’s effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria. In this episode: 00:54 The neuronal basis for acupuncture’s effect on inflammation In mice, electroacupuncture has been shown to reduce inflammation, but only when certain points on the body are stimulated. Why this is has puzzled scientists, but now, …
 
Sunglasses are enormously popular these days, and even prescription spectacles have evolved into fashion accessories -- people routinely spend hundreds of dollars in efforts to either look cool, be able to see, or both. So what happens when a single company controls the market? This is the accusation critics levy against manufacturing giant Essilor…
 
In 1921, Republican President Warren G. Harding entered the White House, ushering in a new era of conservative government. Harding was elected by Americans yearning for tradition and old-fashioned values. But they put in power one of the most scandal-ridden presidencies in American history. Harding filled his administration with corrupt cronies who…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
PART 2: The stunning conclusion of a 3-hour gab session about frickin' bats with America's favorite chiropterologist, Dr. Merlin Tuttle. Learn about bat conversations, their close friendships, surprising dongs, where they keep their nipples, how to go bat spotting after the sun sets, more myths and misconceptions about bat danger, perhaps the gross…
 
“People fear most what they understand least." Words of wisdom from explorer/American treasure/bat expert, Dr. Merlin Tuttle. As your internet dad/host takes care of her surgically recuperating husband this week, we revisit her visit to Austin. In 2019, Alie headed to the bat capital and sat down with the legendary chiropterologist to discuss wild …
 
In this episode of Disappearing Spoon, Sam Kean discusses the horrors of a particular genetic disease that was, literally, sweeping through London in the 1700s. In 1666, the Great Fire of London consumed about 13,000 homes and caused the modern equivalent about $1.3 billion in damage. After the Great Fire, London officials made chimneys mandatory i…
 
Today on the Mushroom Hour we are excited to have the chance to learn from Ja Schindler. Ja is a fungi researcher/ teacher/ activist/ farmer based in the Southeast Cascade Mountains of Oregon on traditional lands of the Kalapooya peoples. Motivated by desires to challenge issues of environmental injustice, Ja founded Fungi For the People in 2010, w…
 
Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement (SUNY Press, 2020) brings a global history approach to the study of esotericism, highlighting the important role of Theosophy in the general histories of religion, science, philosophy, art, and politics. The first half of the book consists of…
 
Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 –1797) was one of the most important moral philosophers and political theorists ever. Her writings on liberty and equality have been embraced by thinkers both in her own day and since her early death. Lionized by feminists and demonized by others as dangerous and a loose woman to boot, Wollstonecraft produced a small but p…
 
If the United States has been so hostile to Marxism, what accounts for Marxism's recurrent attractiveness to certain Americans? Marxism and America: New Appraisals (Manchester University Press, 2021) sheds new light on that question in essays engaging sexuality, gender, race, nationalism, class, memory, and much more, from the Civil War era through…
 
Watch this on video | Buy us a coffee: Chris / Henry / Mario POLAR NEWSREELScientists found that puffins and other auk birds suffer in washing-machine-like waves. // A new research paper outlines how penguin poop reveals changes in the Antarctic ocean. // Help scientists and count penguins online or upload your whale pictures to increase the unders…
 
In Episode 381: Knock Knock Knock, we are joined by Travis, who did not experience anything paranormal in his life until he was around 20 years old, when he had a terrifying hatman encounter. The hatman Travis witnessed was different than many of the descriptions we’ve heard before, because the hatman wasn't alone. When Travis saw him, he was accom…
 
Reporters reveal a new, massive leak detailing a shadowy international network the rich and powerful use to squirrel away billions -- but will this information change anything? Streaming giant YouTube begins pulling anti-vaccination videos. In his suicide note, French ex-police officer François Verove confesses to a string of unsolved serial murder…
 
Niko and Rudy sit down with Jason Moore, author of Capitalism in the Web of Life and The Capitalocene (Part I, II) for a discussion on his approach to world-ecology including the concepts of Capitalism as a way of organizing nature and of the Web of Life. We discuss how Capitalism has organized nature since its inception and why it is necessary to …
 
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