show episodes
 
Live from Southeast Washington, DC we take an in depth look at the current political, social and media trends through a revolutionary lens. Everything from gentrification to Drake beef, black twitter to the military industrial complex. This weekly(ish) podcast is all about calling a spade a spade, talking trash about the oppressor and celebrating our joy despite capitalism.
 
Snollygoster takes an in-depth look at politics in Ohio. Each week we dig into the top political stories in Columbus and Ohio and explore national stories that impact the state by talking with politicians, reporters and other news-makers. (In case you're wondering, a "snollygoster" is a shrewd and unprincipled politician.)Listen to Snollygoster on the WOSU Public Media mobile app or wherever you get your podcasts.
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
Public Health Out Loud is a podcast that delves into the broader public health concerns and issues facing everyday Rhode Islanders. From discussions about safeguarding against future pandemics to actionable plans for families to help keep their loved ones safe from preventable diseases, Public Health Out Loud is striving to be a no nonsense resource for listeners that only want to hear the truth. With all that’s going on in the world at every hour of the day, podcast hosts Dr. James McDonald ...
 
Vancouver's source for Urbanism, Insight, and Evolution. Hosted by Gordon Price, former Vancouver City Councillor and Director of the SFU City Program lecture series. Featuring interviews with leading players and emerging voices on issues of urban planning, architecture, housing, transportation, politics, culture, and public spaces.
 
A podcast dedicated to digital marketing and social media insights for government and public sector pros. Interviews with marketing and communications leaders working in government and public life as well as social media news and top tools and apps wrapped up in the hosts own musings about digital transformation in government communications. The Public Sector Marketing Show is hosted by Joanne Sweeney, founder of the Public Sector Marketing Institute and author of Public Sector Marketing Pro ...
 
With audio postcards from the streets, and inspiring interviews with community activists, we address issues of homelessness, the disappearance of public space, gentrification and the value of helping each other out from our base in Reno, Nevada. We do live reporting, micro storytelling and spoken word. As we face an affordable housing crisis, what happens to our most vulnerable?
 
Here you will find the most Creepy stories found on Internet Narrated. We want to give you some Chills, Fantasies, Amusement and Real events took place. They been documented or researched for the public to know. Don't forget to follow our Podcast channel. Hope give you Chills! - Reach us at info@icreepypastas.co.uk for requests. iDonGraph Group.
 
A half-hour radio show providing critical coverage of disability issues and bringing the insight of the grassroots disability movement to the general public. Pushing Limits advances the voices of people who live with disabilities. It is produced by a collective of media makers and activists who themselves live with disability and airs on Odd Weeks.
 
The South Carolina Business Review, with host Mike Switzer, focuses on news from South Carolina's business community with interviews of many small business owners and business leaders from around the state. South Carolina's nonprofits, including its colleges and universities are also regularly featured on the program, as well as many of the state's small business support organizations. Click here to contact the South Carolina Business Review by email.The South Carolina Business Review is a p ...
 
The PR & Law Podcast looks at the issues of the day through a public relations and legal lens, sharing insights and practical advice for businesses, entrepreneurs, in-house counsel, and communications pros. It's recorded live each week from Hong Kong and Toronto. We also love to take questions! Whether it's about employment law, PR, or anything else, just tag us on social media with #PRLawPod and we'll answer your question on the show. The podcast is published each week on Sunday afternoon E ...
 
Amanda Litman is the co-founder and executive director of Run for Something (and the author of a book by the same name) -- since launching in 2017, RFS has recruited 60,000 people to run for local office across the country. Every Tuesday, you'll meet some of the RFS candidates (and newly elected public servants!): They're parents, scientists, teachers, refugees, artists, veterans, and more, of all races and ethnicities -- the one thing they all share is their commitment to solving problems i ...
 
Forum finds the most interesting stories about where we live, who we are, and charts where our region and world are headed. Hosts Mina Kim and Alexis Madrigal invite communities in the Bay Area and California to engage in meaningful conversation in a two-hour live show that informs and challenges listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints.
 
A non-commercial, educational FM station broadcasting for the public interest, KCSB enters into no commercial contracts which allow access to the airwaves and it strives to provide programming substantially different from that carried by commercial broadcast media. It is also designed to be educational for both programmers and listeners. UCSB students and other programmers are provided an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of radio broadcasting, both technically and in terms of broadcast ...
 
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show series
 
The World Health Organization said COVID-19 infections are up 80% around the world in the last month, overwhelming health systems in many countries. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a pivotal study showing fully vaccinated people can spread the delta variant as readily as non-vaccinated people. Amna Nawaz gets th…
 
In our news wrap Friday, newly disclosed documents highlight the pressure from former President Trump on the Justice Department to overturn the 2020 election results. On a second front, the Justice Department directed the Treasury Department to hand over Trump's tax returns to Congress. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi appealed to the CDC to take emergen…
 
More than 200 Afghans eligible for special immigrant visas arrived in Virginia Friday. They are the first group of former interpreters -- and their families -- who worked with American soldiers on the ground. They're being evacuated by the Biden administration just weeks before the U.S. withdrawal is complete and as Taliban violence increases. Nick…
 
Judy Woodruff and Nick Schifrin discuss the debilitating medical ailments affecting U.S. diplomatic and intelligence officers in Cuba -- which have become known as Havana Syndrome. Six months in, what steps has the Biden administration taken to aid those affected? PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
A pro-democracy protester in Hong Kong was sentenced Friday to nine years in prison, the first prosecution under Beijing's national security law. Now a new amendment to the city's immigration law takes effect Sunday that China says targets illegal refugees. But as special correspondent Richard Kimber reports, critics say the law's wording is vague …
 
New York Times columnist David Brooks and E.J. Dionne from The Washington Post join Judy Woodruff to discuss the bipartisan infrastructure deal, new information about the delta variant's threat, and the Capitol Police testimony during the Jan. 6 hearings. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Fast food is a staple of American culture, but in recent decades there has been a new focus on health and wage inequality. Jeffrey Brown talks to author Marcia Chatelain about the complicated history of McDonalds in the Black community: how the fast food giant supported Black franchise owners, but was a trap for unhealthy diets and low wages. It's …
 
Jane Willenbring is a geologist who solves problems related to the earth's surface. In 2020, she was featured in a NOVA documentary called "Picture a Scientist." She and two other women shared their experiences in the sciences, ranging from brutal harassment to years of subtle slights. Tonight, she gives her Brief But Spectacular take on making sci…
 
Last May the Colonial Pipeline, an American oil pipeline originating in Houston, Texas suffered a ransomware cyberattack, affecting the computer system managing the line. It's just the type of scenario journalist Ted Koppel speculated about in his 2016 book, "Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath." He spoke to Stev…
 
Podcasts are booming, and it’s hard work to choose among the more than 2 million titles now available on popular streaming services like Spotify and iTunes. Whether your tastes veer toward pop culture, true crime or narrative storytelling, we want to hear from you. What’s the podcast you can’t stop telling your friends about? What do you look for i…
 
On Thursday, U.S. gymnast Sunisa Lee won all-around gold as fellow gymnast and defending champion Simone Biles celebrated in the stands following her withdrawal from the event earlier this week. We’ll catch up on the big news--and the controversies around women’s uniforms and athlete mental health--in the first big week of the Olympics. And we hear…
 
Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan are back for season 2 of Public Health Out Loud! In this two-part season opener, our co-hosts are joined by Dr. Pablo Rodriguez, a longtime physician, former medical director of Planned Parenthood of Rhode Island, and an advocate for public health in the local and national Hispanic community. He’s also …
 
Pandemic-Era Expanded Government Benefits Drive U.S. Poverty Rate Down Roughly 20 million people in the U.S. are expected to be brought out of poverty this year, according to a recent Urban Institute research report. Advocates Win Unemployment Case in Arkansas as Republicans Try to Strip Benefits Many Republican-led states have halted the extra $30…
 
Jonathan Mooney tried to fit into the box of normalcy. It cost him his education, his sense of self, his friendships and nearly his life. In his opinion, "Normal Sucks." Jonathan lives with dyslexia and ADHD, and he's dedicated his life to connections with other people who have been treated as not normal. His latest book, Normal Sucks: How to Live,…
 
Roughly 2.7 million civilians working for the federal government now have a big choice to make about COVID-19 shots as President Joe Biden moves to require federal workers get vaccinated or face regular testing. That decision, and the return to the recommendation for Americans to wear face masks indoors, is causing a deep divide across the country,…
 
Judy Woodruff discusses the latest on COVID-19's spread in the U.S. -- which is surging thanks to the delta variant -- and how incentives for those who are unvaccinated and anti-maskers will affect the situation with Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and a member of the Food and Dru…
 
The frustration over masking mandates that has been playing out around the country erupted in Missouri Tuesday night during a county council meeting that focused on the new mask mandates issued just the day before. Dr. Faisal Khan, the acting director of the St Louis County Health Department called to testify during that meeting, faced racial slurs…
 
In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. Congress gave final approval today to $2 billion in emergency spending for Capitol security. The Biden administration will allow a nationwide ban on evictions imposed during the pandemic to expire Saturday. The U.S. Commerce Department said economic growth reached an annual rate of 6.5% in the year's second quart…
 
Tokyo on Thursday registered its highest number yet of COVID-19 cases. Amid American triumphs in the gym and the pool, the reigning world champion pole vaulter Sam Kendricks was forced to leave after testing positive. The Japanese public is split between cheering the medal count and fearing the virus. Opposition to the games has only grown. Special…
 
American gymnast Sunisa Lee's gold medal in gymnastics Thursday makes her the first Hmong American to participate and win in the Olympics. Lee said she trains daily for first-generation Americans and wanted to win for Hmong Americans. John Yang reports on the reaction within the Hmong American community with Bo Thao-Urabe, founder and executive dir…
 
Back in 2015, we asked tech experts if people had become too reliant on algorithms for anything from internet searches, to credit scores, health care, and policing. And in 2016, we invited University of Toronto computer science professor Geoffrey Hinton - whose research on deep learning had been used by Google to help power its search engine - to d…
 
The grey wolf was once nearly hunted to extinction in the U.S. until the federal government put it on the endangered species list in 1974. 20 years later, it was successfully reintroduced to Idaho and Yellowstone. As pack numbers grew, the gray wolf was taken off the list. But more than 50 wildlife groups are worried it may face endangerment again …
 
While art history usually involves portraits of royalty and society's rich and famous, a young Detroit artist is rethinking who deserves a place in the picture. Jeffrey Brown reports for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/fundersBy PBS NewsHour
 
Mayor Noble talks about violence, housing and access to language This week in La Voz en Breve, journalist Mariel Fiori has a show on well-being and business. Kingston Mayor Steve Noble visited the radio to update everyone on his work for residents. The... Read More ›By ROBIN HOOD RADIO
 
"It is 2020 and the City of Flint Says, / 'Don't boil the water' / And I refuse to drink a single drop / from any tap or bottle now. I've stopped / bathing completely, waiting for rain to slick / my skin back on. So begins Jonah Mixon-Webster's poem "Incubation," featured in his debut poetry collection, Stereo(TYPE). Initially published by Ahsahta …
 
A new poll by UC Berkeley's Institute of Governmental Studies shows that among likely voters, 47% favor the recall of Governor Gavin Newsom, and 50% oppose. While the referendum date is September 14th, mail-in voting starts next month and campaigning for and against the proposal is heating up across the state. We look at where the recall currently …
 
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