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Step right up as we guess The Price of Salt in our coverage of Todd Hayne’s Carol (2015). Recently crowned by BFI as the “best LGBT film of all time”, the Deep Cut Trio revisit this critical favorite and find its place in the New Queer Cinema Canon. Ben gets lost in the eyes of leading ladies Blanchett and Mara, Wilson considers the film’s legacy i…
 
Looking for arson, psychosexual manipulation, and reggaetón? It’s a good old-fashioned fight on this week’s episode as the Deep Cut Trio steps up to Pablo Larraín’s 2019 anarchic dance feature, Ema. Wilson adores the movie’s arresting intensity, while Ben finds Ema’s motivations oblique. But where does Eli land? He builds the suspense while everyon…
 
Just in time for the release of Spencer, the Deep Cut trio revisits Jackie, the dreamy 2016 biopic that made Chilean director Pablo Larraín an (art)household name. Eli entrees the film by looking at construction of Jackie the character as purposefully distinct from the real Jackie Kennedy-Onassis, while Wilson remarks on Larraín’s use of physical s…
 
What would you choose? Love…… or terrorism? The trio are joined by special guest Thanmye Lagudu to talk about Mani Ratnam’s most popular film, Dil Se, starring Shah Rukh Khan and Manisha Koirala. Wilson marvels at Ratnam’s ability to trojan horse a radical ideology into mainstream Bollywood screens, Eli wraps his head around the audience’s critical…
 
Strap in for a conversation on one of the greatest romantic epics put to screen and Deep Cut’s first foray into South Asian Cinema. Our special guest Thanmye Lagudu baptizes the three hosts into the “Church of Mani Ratnam” by bringing his 1995 historical fiction epic Bombay based on the Bombay riots. Wilson theorizes how this film probably served a…
 
Another Rohmer film, another incredible ending. We end our series on Rohmer with Ben’s second Deep Cut pick and favorite Rohmer film, the effortlessly loveable and relatable Boyfriends and Girlfriends (1987). Listen to us swoon as we recollect our favorite moments from this classic romantic tale. Wilson celebrates the film’s reverence for young peo…
 
Sink into moral quicksand with us as we discuss the final of Éric Rohmer’s Six Moral Tales: Love In The Afternoon (1972). Wilson contemplates the duality of man from the sidelines as Eli and Ben have a “straight man-off” with wildly different takeaways from the film’s heartstopping moral ending. We also get into the film’s stylistic deviations from…
 
Join us as the trio journey into a bout of summertime sadness with The Green Ray (1986), the first of our episodes on Éric Rohmer’s breezy films on love and longing. We learn about Rohmer’s secretive private life, the improvisational process behind The Green Ray, and we all fall in love with Delphine a little bit. Is lettuce a friend? Tell us in th…
 
Is it Deep Cut’s darkest movie? The trio talks about Lynne Ramsay’s impressionistic family tragedy, 2011’s We Need to Talk About Kevin. Everyone considers the links from We Need to Talk About Kevin to the genre of The Women’s Picture. As Eli recounts his awe at the edit’s approach to creating the feeling of memories, Ben praises Ramsay’s closeups a…
 
Before he went on Robert Deniro’s talk show, Joaquin Phoenix starred in Lynne Ramsay’s dark vigilante thriller from 2017, You Were Never Really Here. Eli kicks off Deep Cut’s look at one of his favorite directors by detailing Ramsay’s distinct, jarring approach to conveying the trauma of her characters. Wilson finds gentle human relationships in th…
 
Deep Cut is visited by the Queen of Sensual Cinema herself, writer/director/actress Isabel Sandoval (Lingua Franca, Señorita, Apparition) to discuss her favorite Eliza Hittman feature, It Felt Like Love (2013). Isabel describes her personal connections to Hittman’s sensitive presentation of adolescence and presents her big theory about debut featur…
 
Deals deals deals. The trio discuss Juzo Itami’s underseen workplace treatise. The comedy draws light talk of women in the workplace, artisanship, and big ol’ capitalism. Wilson goes down a real life true crime rabbit hole, Ben adorns Nobuko Miyamoto with more laurels, and Eli discovers hentai culture. Fresh produce over at the discord server.…
 
The Deep Cut trio is joined by writer/director Andrew Ahn (Spa Night, Driveways and the upcoming Fire Island) to discuss one of his personal favorite movies, Jonathan Glazer’s masterful, mournful Birth (2004). As Andrew reflects on Glazer's expressive directorial style, Ben is stunned by Nicole Kidman’s central performance, Eli interrogates how her…
 
Deep Cut concludes its four-episode series on the Coen brothers with Ben's old favorite, Raising Arizona (1987). Ben considers the power of the movie's marriage of humor and sentiment, Wilson praises the once-in-a-lifetime couple casting of Nic Cage & Holly Hunter, and Eli presents his final Skip Lievsay Corner... for now. To finish, the trio discu…
 
We’re better; we’re back...Deep Cut’s investigation into the Coen brothers continues with Eli’s favorite comedy, 2008’s Burn After Reading. As Eli makes the case for the movie’s inane combination of national security and physical fitness, Wilson extols John Malkovich’s shout-acting and Ben contemplates how dumb a character can be written before it’…
 
Deep Cut’s first ever musical episode (featuring two songs performed on-air!) takes your co-hosts deeper into the world of the Coens. Their discussion on 2013’s Inside Llewyn Davis sees Wilson gush about his love for musicals, Eli drop some knowledge on folk music history, and Ben ruminate on the cyclical plot structure’s reflection of Llewyn’s per…
 
The Deep Cut trio returns for season 2 with the first of four whole episodes on the renowned American writer/director/editor brothers, Joel & Ethan Coen. First up is the popular pick, No Country for Old Men (2007). Ben, Wilson, and Eli track down knowledge on sound designer Skip Lievsay’s focused audio, appreciate the menace of Javier Bardem (and h…
 
"We're a small group of reactionary film podcasters who wanna turn back the clock in film criticism a thousand years." Fire up the mother box with us to resurrect this Spring’s hottest movie discourse: Zack Snyder’s Justice League. Our friend, writer/director Russell Goldman, joins us to battle it out over Snyder’s confident maximalism, The Flash’s…
 
For the final episode of our first season, we're unlocking the basement of the South Korean master director himself, Bong Joon-ho. First up is his internationally renowned masterpiece, Parasite (2019) for a look at Bong's thoughts on capitalism, violence that's as shocking as it is comedic, and Bong's efficient shot construction. Then, we discuss M…
 
This week, we reflect on the modern master of the domestic drama and Eli's favorite screenwriter, Asghar Farhadi. We marvel at the moral complexity of Farhadi's masterpiece, A Separation (2011), dispute over the plotting of The Past (2013), and consider the virtues of car scenes as directed by contemporary Iranian directors. Ride shotgun with us on…
 
On this Very Special Episode, we huddle and talk about our favorite films and TV of 2020!Major films covered: Never Rarely Sometimes Always, Time, Nomadland, Minari, The Woman Who Ran, Small Axe, Tenet, My Octopus Teacher (???), Welcome to Chechnya, and more!TV: I May Destroy You, Normal People, Veneno, How to with John Wilson, Ted Lasso, Better Ca…
 
Hey friends, Don't Look Now (1973) as we take a Walkabout (1971) through the stylish, experimental films of Nicolas Roeg! We step into Roeg's aggressive cinematography and editing, contend with his off-kilter sense of storytelling, and discuss the implications and ethics of Roeg's use of sex and nudity. Buttcheeks on film! Spoiler warning for both …
 
This episode takes us from podcasters to master sleuths: join us as we open the case file on Tomas Alfredson's detective and spy movies The Snowman (2017) and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). After commiserating over (and finding the value in) Alfredson’s notoriously meme-ified flop, we share our admiration for Alfredson’s nuanced, taut adaptation…
 
This is it, the big one. We're covering not one, not two, but THREE Frederick Wiseman documentaries: Titicut Follies (1967), In Jackson Heights (2015), and Cahiers du Cinéma's TOP FILM of 2020: City Hall (2020). We talk about our favorite scenes, the pleasures of watching how things work , and why we insist on calling the director of these seminal …
 
This week we’re discussing the films of Kelly Reichardt: A24 darling, First Cow (2019) and her second film, Old Joy (2006); both kind and gentle films about male friendship. We talk about their different approaches to depicting male friendship, the allure of micro-budget filmmaking, and heap praise on a beautiful cow and an incredible dog. SPOILER …
 
Eli got the chance to interview the co-director/editor for Black Is… Black Aint (1995), Christiane Badgley, and we’re excited to share it with you. Badgley was crucial to helping complete the film after Riggs’ death. Also, you can watch Riggs’ films on OVID.tv and we have an exciting deal for you: use the code ‘DEEPCUT’ for 50% off your first three…
 
This week we’re discussing the groundbreaking documentaries of American filmmaker Marlon Riggs with his two films: Tongues Untied (1989) and Black Is… Black Ain’t (1995). We talk about Riggs’ experimental editing, his amplification of black/queer voices through his filmmaking, and, of course, the joys of Snapthology! You can watch both films on OVI…
 
This episode we’re discussing the “godmother of the French New Wave” herself, Agnès Varda, and her two films: Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) and One Sings, the Other Doesn't (1977). We discuss Varda's incredible ability to make you empathize with her subjects, her approach to depicting women and their relationships, and unfortunately butcher the pronuncia…
 
In our very first episode, we’re discussing Hirokazu Kore-eda and his films: the Palme d’Or winning Shoplifters (2018) and After-Life (1998). Kore-eda is one of our favorite filmmakers, and one that brought the 3 of us together! We discuss his humanistic filmmaking (one of the best in the biz), figure out which movie is better (they're both great!)…
 
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