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Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
Cadence is a podcast about music: how it affects your brain, your life, and the community in which you live. Join our host, cognitive neuroscientist and classically trained opera singer Indre Viskontas while we talk to scientists, musicians, musicologists, and composers to find answers to some of the biggest questions still surrounding the intersection of music and science. How much can we learn about the mind with music as the lens?
 
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If there’s one thing we can probably all agree on, it’s that water is a necessary component for life, right? Well, here to muddy up that argument is the adorable tardigrade which, it turns out, can survive extreme drying or dehydration, and can be revived by simply adding water. Much of what is known about these remarkable creatures comes courtesy …
 
Nina Kraus, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist who has done groundbreaking research on sound and hearing for more than three decades. She's the Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Communication Sciences, and Otolaryngology at Northwestern University, and she has been a frequent guest on Indre’s other podcast, Cadence: What Music Tells Us About the Mind…
 
Who among us hasn’t, at some point, wondered just what exactly a bear manager or a danger tree feller blaster does? Well, Mary Roach, America’s funniest science writer, TED 20 Most Watched list member, and increasingly frequent guest on this podcast has, and now she’s written a book for our collective enlightenment. In today’s episode, Mary discuss…
 
No one would be surprised to hear that anxiety has become a staple of modern life, particularly over the past year and a half, but what may surprise some is that anxiety is a necessary component in our lives that can be managed and kept at a level which actually optimizes our performance. On today’s podcast, Indre is joined by the legendary Dr. Wen…
 
Indre welcomes back Sam Kean, the New York Times bestselling author of The Icepick Surgeon, The Bastard Brigade, Caesar's Last Breath, The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, and more. Sam has won many awards for his writing, and he's been featured on Radiolab, All Things Considered, and of course, Inquiring Minds. His own podcast, The Disappearing …
 
Of all the side effects of opioid use that exist, one that is only recently starting to get the attention it deserves is that of becoming amnestic. That doesn’t mean that this effect hasn’t been on the radar of some researchers over the years, though. As far back as 2016, Neurology Specialist, Dr. Jed Barash, brought some case studies to Indre’s at…
 
One undeniable side effect of the pandemic is that a lot of parents have spent far more time than they ever expected with their kids, and more often than not were left questioning their own parenting decisions frequently along the way. Given that, Melinda Wenner Moyer’s new book, How To Raise Kids Who Aren’t Assholes, could not be more timely as it…
 
As Adam wisely notes, ‘Science forges ahead’, making it high time for another ‘up to date’ segment of Inquiring Minds where he and Indre examine some recent instances of science in the news that they find particularly interesting. From tutoring parrots to migratory bird seed spreaders to the sheer beauty of Adam’s kombucha-infused microbiome, you’r…
 
In the summer of 2019 - long before the world heard of COVID - author, researcher extraordinaire, and ‘Gastropod’ co-host, Nicola Tilley and her husband and co-author, Geoff Manaugh, told a rapt audience, “You and everyone around you is going to be quarantined, is going to experience quarantine in your lifetimes.” They had just presented their exte…
 
Among COVID-19’s many side effects are two that seem to be in direct conflict – on the one hand we’ve all become armchair epidemiologists, and on the other, conspiracy theories are at an all time high. In the common search for answers regarding the virus, some have put all their faith in the certainties of science while others are just as committed…
 
Over the years, music producers have tried to predict what audiences want to hear while at the same time advances in science and technology have taught us a lot about what happens in the brain when we listen to music that we love. Now, David Rosen, CEO and Co-founder of Secret Chord Labs, has brought these two fields together to explore the potenti…
 
What are your thoughts regarding the relationship between the mind and the brain? For that matter, what are your thoughts? Iris Berent has definitely done some deep thinking on these questions, unearthing the stories we tell ourselves about what we know and who we are as well as the impact these stories can have. She shares her thoughts here today …
 
When was the last time you thought about geometry? Unless you're an architect or a kindergarten teacher, you probably don't spend a lot of time thinking about shapes. But mathematician Jordan Ellenberg wants to bring geometry back, and show us not just how shapes can measure the world, but how they can explain it. Support the show: https://www.patr…
 
Joining Indre on the podcast today is University of Virginia Professor, Leidy Klotz. A former professional soccer player, Leidy has gone on to pursue his interest in studying how we transform things from how they are to how we want them to be, and has written for a number of prominent publications including The Washington Post, The Globe and Mail, …
 
This week: New research on the first known interstellar object in our solar system, A/2017 U1—or Oumuamua—suggesting it’s probably a chunk of a Pluto-like planet, and not from aliens; research that used 2,000 microphones to get super detailed recordings of hummingbirds and learn how they make the sounds they make; the impact of alcohol consumption …
 
This week: We look at new paleogenetic research on mammoth molars; delve into the biological drive for napping; and talk about a surprising new study on memory that involves transcranial magnetic stimulation. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
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