show episodes
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
Welcome to the Oxford Adult ESL Conversations podcast, hosted by Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, co-author of the Oxford Picture Dictionary and series director of the new Step Forward Second Edition. In this podcast series, Jayme is joined by Adult ESL educators, thought leaders, and advocates for candid conversations about topics important to teachers in this dynamic field.
 
The Department of Statistics at Oxford is a world leader in research including computational statistics and statistical methodology, applied probability, bioinformatics and mathematical genetics. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Oxford's Mathematical Sciences submission was ranked overall best in the UK. This is an exciting time for the Department. We have now moved into our new home on St Giles and we are currently settling in. The new building provides improved lecture and ...
 
Fantasy Literature has emerged as one of the most important genres over the past few decades and now enjoys extraordinary levels of popularity. The impact of Tolkien’s Middle-earth works and the serialisation of George Martin’s ‘Game of Thrones’ books has moved these and their contemporaries into mainstream culture. As the popularity grows so does interest in the roots of fantasy, the main writers and themes, and how to approach these texts. Oxford is a natural home to fantasy literature wit ...
 
The Middle East Centre, founded in 1957 at St Antony’s College is the centre for the interdisciplinary study of the modern Middle East in the University of Oxford. Centre Fellows teach and conduct research in the humanities and social sciences with direct reference to the Arab world, Iran, Israel and Turkey, with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However, during our regular Friday seminar series, attracting a wide audience, our distinguished speakers bring topics ...
 
A selection of seminars and special lectures on wide-ranging topics relating to practical ethics. The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics was established in 2002 with the support of the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education of Japan. It is an integral part of the philosophy faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
The Africa Oxford Initiative (AfOx) is a cross-university platform for all things Africa in Oxford. The overarching vision of AfOx is to make Africa a strategic priority for the University of Oxford, while also building equitable research collaborations between researchers and academics from African institutions and the University of Oxford. Throughout the year AfOx hosts several events and workshops about Africa-focussed research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. T ...
 
A one day conference showcasing the wide variety of research and projects being undertaken by Academics under the Humanities Division at the University of Oxford. From Philosophy and Neuroscience to Politics and International Relations to Literary Analysis and the History of Ideas, Oxford's Humanities Division crosses departments and subjects in its research goals.
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
The inaugural Oxford-India Day took place on 17 June 2011. The event aimed to celebrate the longstanding and varied links between the University and India, and to reinvigorate and strengthen those links. Over 80 external guests, representing Indian business, Indian government, UK government, Indian civil society, journalism, law and academia came to Oxford, exploring cutting-edge collaborative research; the students and staff who have come to Oxford from India; and the outstanding collection ...
 
The Global Thinkers Project, Oxford was launched in 2017 with the aim of reviving silenced voices in the discipline of International Relations (IR). It explores the internationalist thought of individuals who have made significant contributions in international affairs but have been excluded from the discipline due to biases of language, region, and gender. By encouraging IR to 'rethink its thinkers', our project responds to a call for a more inclusive, diverse, and ‘Global IR’, making Oxfor ...
 
Immunology is the study of the body's defence mechanisms, from the barrier of skin to the workings of the cellular immune system. Our Immunology podcasts describe the work of NDM researchers to understand the molecular processes of the immune system, and its role in infection, inflammation, and disease.
 
The Department of Physics public lecture series. An exciting series of lectures about the research at Oxford Physics take place throughout the academic year. Looking at topics diverse as the creation of the universe to the science of climate change. Features episodes previously published as: (1) 'Oxford Physics Alumni': "Informal interviews with physics alumni at events, lectures and other alumni related activities." (2) 'Physics and Philosophy: Arguments, Experiments and a Few Things in Bet ...
 
These oral history interviews, conducted by Georgina Ferry, capture the stories of pioneering women at the forefront of research, teaching and service provision for computing in Oxford, 1950s-1990s. Themes throughout the interviews include career opportunities, gender splits in computing, the origins and development of computing teaching and research in Oxford, as well as development of the University of Oxford's Computing Service and the commercial software house the Numerical Algorithms Gr ...
 
Every year more than 10 million children under the age of five die in developing countries, nearly a million from malaria alone. Every day more than 2500 people die of malaria, most of them children. These are the statistics that help drive the tenacious work of Oxford researchers in tropical medicine. The genesis of Oxford’s involvement goes back to a conversation over a bottle of whiskey, between David Weatherall and Peter Williams, the then Director of the Wellcome Trust, in New York in 1 ...
 
In this series of podcasts we consider the impact of opening up science: allowing both the research community and the public to freely access the results of scientific work. Individuals can be fully informed about medical or environmental research, students worldwide can get access to the latest work, and software agents can roam the vast scientific knowledge base seeking patterns and correlations that no human has observed. Ultimately, it may profoundly change the way science is done. The r ...
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law at Oxford website. .
 
Welcome to Chemistry at Oxford! Our M. Chem. topped the subject ranking for Chemistry in the Guardian's University Guide 2014, and no other university can match the simultaneous breadth and depth of the Oxford Chemistry experience. You'll study a four-year course, and spend your final year working full-time on a project with some of the leading researchers in the UK. Fundamental science and blue skies thinking are celebrated here, but so is commercialisation - maybe your work will help launc ...
 
The Oxford Food Governance Group is an interdisciplinary group of researchers from the Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS), Said Business School, and the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) at the University of Oxford, who share an interest in food governance practices. Looking at the politics of food distribution, sustainability, and governance of the food supply among other topics, this series will look at how we get our food and why it matters.
 
Vaccines save millions of lives each year; however, some of the world's worst diseases are still difficult to prevent. Our series of podcasts on Epidemics and Vaccines detail the research within NDM to combat diseases such as hepatitis, influenza and tuberculosis, through development of novel vaccines and vaccine delivery mechanisms and strategies. Developing countries and vulnerable populations are a particular focus of some of this work.
 
In this fun and informative series Dr Lindsay Turnbull, Associate Professor and Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford University, looks at the biology of the back garden. This series is recorded hot off the press in a normal garden in England beginning in March 2020 and would be of interest to anyone from age 5+. The series is particularly useful for children missing school who would like to carry on practical work in their own garden and have an expert help them understand the theory behind ...
 
Translational and Clinical Medicine is the ongoing effort to bring basic science from the bench to the patient, as well as to elucidate safety and effectiveness of the medicines on which we depend. The NDM podcasts on translational and clinical medicine detail our work in this wide-ranging field, from the identification and design of new medicines to clinical trials and trial design and regulation.
 
The study of populations and demographics is explained in detail in this introductory series by Professor David Coleman, Professor of Demography. Using statistics gathered from censuses, parish records and other sources, Professor Coleman looks at the ways in which populations rise and fall through history. This series is at an introductory level and individuals need no prior knowledge of analyzing statistics or mathematics.
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
What do medicine and translation have in common? In what sense, and to what extent, is translation used in contexts as different as the transfer of meaning from one language (or medium) to the other, the concept of knowledge translation, and the process of protein synthesis? How will a nuanced understanding of translation help us live a healthier, happier and longer life? In this newly-launched seminar series, we will explore these questions in an interdisciplinary way, with the aim to endor ...
 
The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford is the largest university library system in the United Kingdom. It includes the principal University library - the Bodleian Library - which has been a legal deposit library for 400 years; as well as 28 other libraries across Oxford including major research libraries and faculty, department and institute libraries. Together, the Libraries hold more than 12 million printed items, over 80,000 e-journals and outstanding special collections inclu ...
 
Reimagine is a new and original podcast series from the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Said Business School, presented by Peter Drobac. In this series we meet the visionaries, the disruptors, the world’s problem-solvers, who are taking up the challenge of fixing the bits of our world that are broken. The people who see things differently, and we need them now more than ever.
 
This two-day conference provided a forum for academics, practitioners and government representatives to evaluate the current debate and future shape of the post-2015 agenda from a human rights perspective. It was focused on both theoretical and practical aspects of integrating human rights in the post-2105 agenda, with a particular focus on poverty, environment and peace and security.
 
A series of 8 lectures on General Philosophy, delivered to first year Oxford University undergraduates in Michaelmas term 2018. The lectures cover six main topics: Knowledge and Scepticism, Induction, Mind and Body, Personal Identity, Free Will, God and Evil. But they set these topics within a much broader context, encompassing humanity’s history of discovery about the natural world (both in physics and biology), and our place within it (linked to issues of both evolution and morality). Main ...
 
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show series
 
On today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we focused on human consciousness and how studying the neurological basis for human cognition can lead not only to better health but a better understanding of human culture, language, and society as well. We are joined today by Dr. John Parrington, author of the newly published book Mind Shift: How Culture …
 
In this episode, South African agritech startup founder Karidas Tshintsholo addresses the questions like: What effect does access to certified inputs have on overall farmer success? and How can easier access to technical advisory & services improve yields?Prior to founding KHULA!, Karidas co-founded a South African media company called the Money Tr…
 
Book at Lunchtime is a series of bite-sized book discussions held weekly during term-time, with commentators from a range of disciplines. The events are free to attend and open to all. About the book:The emancipatory promise of liberalism - and its exclusionary qualities - shaped the fate of Jews in many parts of the world during the age of empire.…
 
An interview with Rachael Marsay about the William Morris and E. R. Eddison collections at the Bodleian Library An interview with Rachael Marsay about the William Morris and E. R. Eddison collections at the Bodleian Library. This covers the illuminated manuscripts of Morris, and the letters, drafts, and juvenilia of Eddison. Rachael Marsay is the R…
 
In this podcast, David Wilkinson, the editor of The Oxford Review talks with Dr. Roger Noon about the C2 Model of presence in coaching. For the full notes, links, see the model, transcript etc. go to: https://www.oxford-review.com/coaching-presence-what-it-is-and-how-to-develop-it-with-dr-roger-noon/…
 
This episode looks at impartiality and news and whether news audiences value journalism that takes particular perspectives on certain issues or news which presents a range of views leaving it up to the public to decide between them. Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She …
 
This lecture is a visual treat as Ingrid Daubechies celebrates the joy, creativity and beauty of mathematics. Inspired by textile artist Dominique Ehrmann, Ingrid, with Dominique, conceived the idea of a large mathematical installation that incorporated a myriad of mathematical ideas in an entertaining and visually stimulating way. Aided by the whi…
 
From the creative ensemble behind Complicité’s sensational A Disappearing Number, this two-hander unfolds to reveal an intriguing take on mortality, consciousness and artificial life. Alone in a cube that glows in the darkness, X is content with its infinite universe and abstract thought. But then Y appears, insisting they interact, exposing X to Y…
 
This UNAJUA series features a South African agritech founder called Karidas Tshitshonlo. Karidas has a lot of insight to share from his agribusiness adventure thus far, but before we get to that.Karidas T. shares his take on how innovation in agriculture is providing new opportunities not only to the farmers but to the consumers as well. Khula App …
 
This episode looks at public understanding of the financial pressures that the news media is under, how much they are concerned about it, and what they think should be done. Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an expert in newsroom operations and organisational chan…
 
In this episode David talks with Professor Blake Jelley from the University of Prince Edward Island’s Faculty of Business. In this podcast Blake talks about a recent study he conducted looking at Using Personality Feedback for Work-Related Development and Performance Improvement. For all the links, transcript and more go to: https://www.oxford-revi…
 
Visit oup.com/elt/LoveAdultESL for more useful resources. In this episode, Anthony and Jayme discuss the process and benefits of pivoting to remote instruction for ESOL learners with limited digital literacy. This series has been developed specifically for Adult ESL teachers in … Continue reading →By Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
 
In this third episode of series 2 of Word Up with Helen Prince, Helen chats to Lauren Stephenson about metacognition and bridging the gap between research and the classroom. Lauren also talks about her role in the Research Schools Network, how research shows that working on self-regulation and metacognition with your students can add months to thei…
 
Mwihaki Mundia gives a perspective of how brachiaria grass is exceptionally suited for the Sub-Saharan African livestock farmers especially looking at what climate and soil type does it thrive in. She further weighs in on the dynamic “rivalry” with fodder options such as the popular Napier and Brachiaria grass.On this instalment, Mwihaki Mundia arg…
 
This episode focuses on how people engage with local news, and the sources of information, including local news outlets, social media and others, that news audiences use for various topics. Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an expert in newsroom operations and org…
 
Laura Varnam discusses dragons in fantasy literature. Laura Varnam discusses dragons in fantasy literature, exploring the ways in which the dragon of Beowulf inspired Tolkien in his writing of Smaug, allowed Maria Dahvana Headley to explore female power in her 2020 interpretation of the text, and gave Varnam herself new material for two original po…
 
This episode focuses on findings around perceptions of fairness among different groups including demographic characteristics and political leaning. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. This episode focuses on findings around perceptio…
 
Quan Zhou, Texas A and M University, gives an OxCSML Seminar on Friday 25th June 2021. Abstract:In a model selection problem, the size of the state space typically grows exponentially (or even faster) with p (the number of variables). But MCMC methods for model selection usually rely on local moves which only look at a neighborhood of size polynomi…
 
In this second episode of series 2 of Word Up with Helen Prince, Helen and Aaron Bradbury discuss the importance of creating a sense of belonging in the classroom and Aaron offers three ideas for teachers to take away around diversity, equity and inclusion. Aaron is Principal Lecturer Early Years and Childhood (Learning and Development, Psychology,…
 
This UNAJUA Series - presented by Kenyan die-hard environment advocate and comms pro, Mwihaki Mundia - offers a minimum actionable response to the question: "Could the adoption of Brachiaria grass be a game-changer for livestock farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa?"As part of her Communications Specialist role at the International Livestock Research Inst…
 
June is National Ocean Month in the United States, and earlier this month, the whole world observed World Oceans Day, a day that has been celebrated since 2008 with a different theme each year. The theme for 2021 was “Life and Livelihoods.” Covering 71% of the earth’s surface, the ocean is home to a vast array of life—an estimated 2.2 million speci…
 
A TORCH Book at Lunchtime webinar on ‘Born to Write: Literary Families and Social Hierarchy in Early Modern France’ by Professor Neil Kenny. Book at Lunchtime is a series of bite-sized book discussions held weekly during term-time, with commentators from a range of disciplines. The events are free to attend and open to all.About the book:It is easy…
 
This episode focuses on how people get news about climate change and how this differs across different countries, age brackets and attitudes towards the issue. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. This episode focuses on how people ge…
 
Author Maria Dahvana Headley reads from her 2018 novel The Mere Wife, is interviewed by Prof. Carolyne Larrington, and shares drafts from her 2020 translation of Beowulf. This lecture was recorded live at St John’s College, Oxford in November 2018. Author Maria Dahvana Headley reads from her 2018 novel The Mere Wife, is interviewed by Prof. Carolyn…
 
TORCH Book at Lunchtime webinar on Porcelain: Poem on the Downfall of my City by Durs Grünbein, translated by Professor Karen Leeder. Book at Lunchtime is a series of bite-sized book discussions held weekly during term-time, with commentators from a range of disciplines. The events are free to attend and open to all.About the book:Porcelain is a bo…
 
A TORCH Book at Lunchtime webinar on ‘China's Good War: How World War II is Shaping a New Nationalism’ by Professor Rana Mitter. Book at Lunchtime is a series of bite-sized book discussions held weekly during term-time, with commentators from a range of disciplines. The events are free to attend and open to all.About the book:For most of its histor…
 
In this bonus, episode (the second of a two-part conversation), Socialstack Co-founder and CEO Andrew Berkowitz joins African Tech Roundup Co-founder and Executive Producer Andile Masuku to discuss some of the technicalities of the $ATRU launch.They discuss the merits of launching the token on the Celo blockchain and share details about how you can…
 
A talk on Neil Gaiman's 'American Gods'. A talk by Professor Heather O'Donoghue, Lincoln College, Oxford on Neil Gaiman's 'American Gods' and in particular the relationship to Old Norse mythology, and the issues of immigration and modern-day America. Professor O'Donoghue is Professor of Old Norse and Vigfusson Rausing Reader in Ancient Icelandic Li…
 
Distinguished Speaker Seminar - Friday 18th June 2021, with Susan Murphy, Professor of Statistics and Computer Science, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Reinforcement Learning provides an attractive suite of online learning methods for personalizing interventions in a Digital Health. However after a reinforcement …
 
Graduate Lecture - Thursday 3rd June 2021, with Dr Fergus Boyles. Department of Statistics, University of Oxford. Drug discovery is a long and laborious process, with ever growing costs and dwindling productivity making it ever more difficult to bring new medicines to the market in an affordable and timely fashion. There is a long history of applyi…
 
OxCSML Seminar - Friday 28th May 2021, presented by Alexandra Carpentier (University of Magdeburg). In this talk we will discuss the thresholding bandit problem, i.e. a sequential learning setting where the learner samples sequentially K unknown distributions for T times, and aims at outputting at the end the set of distributions whose means \mu_k …
 
Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. In this episode we look at the main findings…
 
In this podcast David talks with Grand van Ulbrich about a recently published paper detailing a new personal change model, or more rightly, two models - Scared - So What. For full notes, diagrams of the models and Grants details go to: https://www.oxford-review.com/personal-change-model/By The Oxford Review
 
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