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Science fiction author David Barr Kirtley talks geek culture with guests such as Neil Gaiman (#253), George R. R. Martin (#22), Richard Dawkins (#46), Wil Wheaton (#398), Bill Nye (#273), Margaret Atwood (#94), Neil deGrasse Tyson (#32), and Ursula K. Le Guin (#65). Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy has appeared on recommended podcast lists from NPR, The Guardian, The A.V. Club, BBC America, CBC Radio, WVXU, io9, Omni, The Strand, Library Journal, and Popular Mechanics. CBC Radio writes, "You may n ...
 
Welcome to the IQ Knowledge Junkie podcast, where enlightening ideas come from! I’m The Author of “LMAOKJ” (Learning More After Obstacles Kenneth Journey) “LMFAOKJ” (Learning Motivation From All Over Knowledge Junkie) “IQKJ” (Inspiring Quotations Knowledgeably Justified) & “KMSL” (Knowledgeable Mentalities Sustainably Lived). I’ve been in a magazine, won the best sense of humor award in High School and I plan on owning a NBA Team & an Amusement Park. Creator of a board game coming soon! Inst ...
 
Join journalist, Kizzy Cox, and comedian, Onika McLean, the hosts of What’s The 411, as they do a quick take on people and events from hip-hop and pop culture; and a fresh take on the activities of people and subjects in the news or, just because they want to. Check us out for comedy and hilarity, and seriousness, especially if you get called on the carpet. An Ebony #1 pick by someone named Ebony, What’s The 411 has interviews with celebrities and wannabe celebs, as well as, authors and info ...
 
MythVision Podcast (MVP) brings you some of the finest information surrounding mythology from a variety of people in search for better understanding of ancient text. We discuss mythology, syncretism, astrotheology, gematria, sacred geometry, secret societies, ancient languages, history, prophecy, scholarship, conspiracies, heretical ideas, myth interpretations etc... If you enjoy these topics and so much more subscribe & like plus share this information with others. Feel free to partner with ...
 
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show series
 
Matthew 9:37-38 In November of last year, thousands of care workers up and down the UK were forced out of their jobs in a sector which as it stands is already facing a daunting shortage of more than 100,000 workers. The care sector is not alone in this crisis. The NHS is facing the same problem. According to the latest NHS figures, 85,000 of its st…
 
Embattled Dreamlands: The Politics of Contesting Armenian, Kurdish and Turkish Memory (Routledge, 2020) explores the complex relationship between competing national myths, imagined boundaries and local memories in the threefold-contested geography referred to as Eastern Turkey, Western Armenia or Northern Kurdistan. Spatially rooted in the shatter …
 
In this episode, inspired by reading Don Webb’s new book: Energy Magick of the Vampyre, we chat on the nature of such a practice and on the vampire as a mythical symbol more broadly and as a strategy to the game of life (?) Also, Michael Aquino’s eyebrows slither in as well as some current events and relevant topics and little devils. Bonus follow …
 
Acts 2:41-47 We live in a world where we’re continually told that change is good. Whether it be the political sphere or the workplace environment; education or the arts — to remain constant and the same is deemed to be a failure. I remember as a teacher, working in secondary education, it was frowned upon if you stayed too long teaching in the same…
 
Romans 6:1-14 What soldier is armed with an ornamental sword, to take to the field of battle? Outwardly, it appears shiny behold, but when drawn from its sheath the soldier finds the blade is blunt! So many Christians, arm themselves with the great positional statements of Holy Scripture, and yet when asked to see the evidence of such truths in the…
 
Holocaust movies have become an important segment of world cinema and the de-facto Holocaust education for many. One quarter of all American-produced Holocaust-related feature films have won or been nominated for at least one Oscar. Yet most Holocaust movies have fallen through the cracks and few have been commercially successful. In Holocaust Cine…
 
For the past 30 years, a group of Russian scholars have dedicated themselves to uncovering the crimes of Stalinism. Their organization, Memorial, has in that time made great strides in understanding the scale, nature and history of Stalin's repression. On 28 December 2021, Russia's highest court found that Memorial was in violation of the Russian F…
 
In the wake of unthinkable atrocities, it is reasonable to ask how any population can move on from the experience of genocide. Simply remembering the past can, in the shadow of mass death, be retraumatizing. So how can such momentous events be memorialized in a way that is productive and even healing for survivors? Genocide memorials tell a story a…
 
2 Corinthians 12:1-10 Just this past week, I was enjoying a moment, reading a book when I came across a statement that beautifully ministered to my heart. It involves a Pastor and a particular lady who came forward in one of his meetings. I’ll allow the Pastor to tell it in his own words: “She was somewhat timid and quiet, and she brought with her …
 
On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, Th…
 
Political Scientist Mark Berlin’s new book, Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes (Oxford UP, 2020), examines the process through which laws against international crimes are established and integrated into the legal regimes of nations. One of the initial questions Berlin hoped to answer with his wor…
 
Roger Mac Ginty's book Everyday Peace: How So-Called Ordinary People Can Disrupt Violent Conflict (Oxford UP, 2021) focuses on how individuals and communities navigate through, and out of, conflict. Through theory and concept-building, and empirical examples, it investigates the pro-peace tactical agency deployed by individuals and communities in c…
 
The Phi Beta Kappa Book Awards are presented annually to three outstanding scholarly books published in the United States. The 2021 winners are Jenn Shapland for My Autobiography of Carson McCullers; Sarah Stewart Johnson for The Sirens of Mars: Searching for Life on Another World; and Alice Baumgartner for South to Freedom: Runaway Slaves to Mexic…
 
The archives produced by international courts have received little empirical, theoretical or methodological attention within international criminal justice (ICJ) or international relations (IR) studies. Yet, Henry Redwood argues in The Archival Politics of International Courts (Cambridge University Press, 2021), these archives both contain a signif…
 
The idea that states share a responsibility to shield people everywhere from atrocities is presently under threat. Despite some early twenty-first century successes, including the 2005 United Nations endorsement of the Responsibility to Protect, the project has been placed into jeopardy due to catastrophes in such places as Syria, Myanmar, and Yeme…
 
In this interview with philosopher, artist, and machine learning/ AI theorist Alex Kiefer, we dig deep into the current state of artificial intelligence, with a particular focus on its more troubling implications. Lots of the threads we've been following lately are tied up here. http://alexbkiefer.net/ Bonus Episodes, follow ups, written content an…
 
NB: This interview contains material about wartime experiences that may be upsetting to some listeners. When Alex Panasenko was born in 1933, his native Ukraine was devastated by Stalin’s program of mass starvation; millions were murdered and, soon after, millions more removed in Stalin’s Great Purge. In 1941, when Panasenko was eight years old, Hi…
 
Most of us think we know the story of Bambi—but do we? The Original Bambi: The Story of a Life in the Forest (Princeton UP, 2022) is an all-new, illustrated translation of a literary classic that presents the story as it was meant to be told. For decades, readers’ images of Bambi have been shaped by the 1942 Walt Disney film—an idealized look at a …
 
Steve chats with Elena Lopez, Bharat Mehra, and Maggie Caspe, editors of A Librarian’s Guide to Engaging Families in Learning, about how they first got involved with libraries, the benefits of family engagement, and adapting in times of crisis. Read the transcript! M. Elena Lopez is an independent researcher whose work focuses on the ecology of lea…
 
Colossians 3:15 We live in a generation where a growing disregard for basic manners is fast becoming the norm. One can teach a youngster the practice of good etiquette — “Don’t speak with your mouth full”, “Don’t interrupt a conversation”, “Knock before you enter” — the P’s and Q’s — yes please, no thank you, excuse me. All of these we can and shou…
 
Ephesians 4:1-6 This world that we presently call home; this fading temporary abode, is a world that stands fiercely divided. Now, of course, I don’t refer to the physical landmass we call planet earth, I speak of the people who populate it. On every hand as one beholds, one sees division and schism — person against person, tribe against tribe, kin…
 
On this episode we were joined by Yasmina Hashemi and M. Elizabeth Scott to discuss their ongoing project GOHAR X GRAIL. In their words GOHAR X GRAIL is a vessel for reflection uncovering the hidden influence of Iranian culture on the traditions of the British Isles & beyond. Tracing nomadic migratory patterns, histories of cultural exchange, and s…
 
Is it possible that efforts to make war more humane can actually make it more common and thus more destructive? This tension at the heart of this query lies at the heart of Samuel Moyn's new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War (Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 2021). He draws fascinating connections between literary fig…
 
Several months ago, Saskia Wieringa joined her co-authors Jess Melvin and Annie Pohlman on the show to talk about their edited volume The International People's Tribunal for 1965 and the Indonesian Genocide. This time, Wieringa is on the show to talk about another co-edited volume. Propaganda and the Genocide in Indonesia (Routledge, 2018) is a kin…
 
Jeffrey Bachman's edited volume Cultural Genocide: Law, Politics, and Global Manifestations (Routledge, 2019) asks where the boundaries between genocide and other kinds of mass atrocity violence rest and what the stakes are in locating them here rather than there. Bachman, Senior Professorial Lecturer at the American University and a co-host of thi…
 
Steve chats with Meredith Farkas, faculty librarian at Portland Community College in Oregon, about her path to librarianship, the concept of slow librarianship, avoiding techno-saviorism, and why she ended her long-running American Libraries column. Read the transcript! Meredith Farkas (she/her) is a faculty librarian at Portland Community College …
 
Jeremiah 12:1-5 The year was 1944 when the Communist party seized power in Romania. Literally overnight, a million Russian troops poured onto the soil of Romania. In what was heralded as the “freeing” of Romania, saw instead, women raped, shops looted, men robbed and murdered. Christians were imprisoned, tortured, kidnapped, and murdered for posses…
 
What motivated conscripted soldiers to fight in the Romanian Army during the Second World War? Why did they obey orders, take risks, and sometimes deliberately sacrifice their lives for the mission? What made soldiers murder, rape, and pillage, massacring Jews en masse during Operation Barbarossa? Grant Harward’s ground-breaking book Romania's Holy…
 
The biophysicist has been running a discovery research lab for two decades at Johns Hopkins. She speaks with Fred about the randomness underlying all molecular processes, computer models that enable the integration of multiple scientific disciplines, and what she sees as compelling strategies for a more inclusive STEM pipeline. This interview was r…
 
In The Work of Rape (Duke UP, 2021), Rana M. Jaleel argues that the redefinition of sexual violence within international law as a war crime, crime against humanity, and genocide owes a disturbing and unacknowledged debt to power and knowledge achieved from racial, imperial, and settler colonial domination. Prioritizing critiques of racial capitalis…
 
Deuteronomy 8:1-6 Horatio Spafford was a Presbyterian layman from Chicago and was a successful lawyer and businessman. Humanly speaking, this man had everything going for him. He loved the Lord and was happily married with five beautiful children. However, things were about to take a drastic and sudden turn, in a series of events reminiscent of the…
 
In this episode, we chat the lives and works of three subtly (and sometimes not so subtly) influential weirdos: William Cooper, Richard S. Shaver, and Ray Palmer. Behold a hollow earth! Check out Patreon.com/consensusunreality for Bonus Episodes, Written Content and Paranormal Experiments and Exercises! Merch:https://consensusunreality.bandcamp.com…
 
Ümit Kurt, born and raised in Gaziantep, Turkey, was astonished to learn that his hometown once had a large and active Armenian community. The Armenian presence in Aintab, the city’s name during the Ottoman period, had not only been destroyed―it had been replaced. To every appearance, Gaziantep was a typical Turkish city. Kurt digs into the details…
 
2 Corinthians 10:3-5 There is a war that has been raging for the last two-thousand years. On one side stand the Saints of God — the army of the Church of Jesus Christ; and on the other side, principalities, and powers, rulers of the darkness of this world, spiritual wickedness in high places. If one was to stop the average person in the street and …
 
In 1994, almost one million ethnic Tutsis were killed in the genocide in Rwanda. In the aftermath of the genocide, some of the top-echelon Hutu officers who had organized it fled Rwanda to the eastern Congo (DRC) and set up a new base for military operation, with the goal of retaking power in Kigali, Rwanda. More than twenty years later, these rebe…
 
Romans 5:20-21 I find increasingly of late that cardinal and principal doctrines of the Christian faith are being called into question, not (I might add) from those outside the fold, but on the contrary, from those who claim to be inside the fold. Long established doctrines of the most immanent importance are simply being brushed aside and labelled…
 
In this Origininally Patreon exclusive episode, now unlocked for our free-cast, we chat all things Nicholas Roerich, a fascinating figure in 20th century politics, art, and esoteric and theosophical circles, and supposed caretaker of the fabled Lapis Exillis or Stone of Destiny! Stay tuned we have some exciting things coming to Patreon this season!…
 
Today, nearly any group or nation with violence in its past has constructed or is planning a memorial museum as a mechanism for confronting past trauma, often together with truth commissions, trials, and/or other symbolic or material reparations. In Exhibiting Atrocity: Memorial Museums and the Politics of Past Violence (Rutgers University Press, 2…
 
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