show episodes
 
They are natural-born-leaders with a never-ending thirst for power. Through force and deceit, they rise through the ranks towards radicalism—eliminating anyone who stands in their way. Every Tuesday, delve into the minds, and motives, behind some of the world’s most infamous leaders in Parcast’s original series, DICTATORS. Each dictator is analyzed in 2-part episodes...with the first giving insight into their rise to power, and the second chronicling the impact of their downfall.
 
The War Room Show is a fast paced, hard hitting news transmission for the afternoon drive. Featuring roundtable discussions with guests from around the world. Hosted by Infowars reporters Owen Shroyer LIVE M-F 3pm-6pm CT at https://infowars.com/show
 
A bi-monthly non-partisan podcast brought to you by Geopolitical Futures, an online publication founded by internationally recognized geopolitical forecaster George Friedman. Geopolitical Futures tells you what matters in international affairs and what doesn’t. Go to https://geopoliticalfutures.com/podcast for details.
 
"The Good Fight," the podcast that searches for the ideas, policies and strategies that can beat authoritarian populism.Please do listen and spread the word about The Good Fight.If you have not yet signed up for our podcast, please do so now by following this link on your phone.Email: goodfightpod@gmail.comTwitter: @Yascha_MounkWebsite: http://www.persuasion.community
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
At a time when our nation is portrayed as increasingly polarized, media often ignore viewpoints and stories that are worthy of attention. American Thought Leaders, hosted by The Epoch Times Senior Editor Jan Jekielek, features in-depth discussions with some of America’s most influential thought leaders on pertinent issues facing our nation today.
 
Crossroads is a channel from The Epoch Times focused on political discussion, traditional values, spirituality, and philosophy. Join host Joshua Philipp as he speaks with experts and authors about politics, history, and the values that are worth keeping.
 
Politics on the Couch looks at the way our minds respond to politics and the way politicians mess with our minds. In each episode award-winning political columnist Rafael Behr is joined by a distinguished expert drawn from the world of politics, psychology or philosophy. The show will appeal to any listener interested in taking a deep dive into how psychology drives everyone's political thought and behaviour.
 
Join Thomas for some critical thinking on questions of science, philosophy, skepticism and politics. These serious topics are discussed with some serious guests, but in an entertaining and engaging way! This is not your typical interview podcast; it’s a friendly dialogue, conducted thoughtfully and with plenty of humor. It's Serious Inquiries Only; but like, not boring or anything.
 
With all the noise created by a 24/7 news cycle, it can be hard to really grasp what's going on in politics today. We provide a fresh perspective on the biggest political stories not through opinion and anecdotes, but rigorous scholarship, massive data sets and a deep knowledge of theory. Understand the political science beyond the headlines with Harris School of Public Policy Professors William Howell, Anthony Fowler and Wioletta Dziuda. Our show is part of the University of Chicago Podcast ...
 
Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
Mark Blyth, political economist at The Watson Institute at Brown University, and Carrie Nordlund, political scientist and associate director of Brown's Master of Public Affairs program, share their take on the news. Subscribe now to hear Mark and Carrie cut through the media haze, and provide a thought-provoking, topical, and often hilarious conversation about the world today.
 
“Can He Do That?” is The Washington Post’s politics podcast, exploring presidential power in the face of weakened institutions, a divided electorate and changing political norms. Led by host Allison Michaels, each episode asks a new question about this extraordinary moment in American history and answers with insight into how our government works, how to understand ongoing events, and the implications when so much about the current state of American life and the country’s politics is unlike ...
 
The old forms of the left are moribund and the new forms are stupid. We're making a podcast that talks about the need to organize a dialectical pessimism and develop a Marxist salvage project capable of putting up a good fight as the world burns around us. A clean, honest, and unsentimental melancholy is required; we've cultivated one and would like to share it with you.
 
All Things Co-op is a bi-weekly podcast produced by Democracy at Work that explores everything co-op. From theoretical and philosophical conversations about political economy and the relations of production, to on-the-ground interviews with cooperative workers, All Things Coop aims to appeal to a wide audience of activists, organizers, workers, and students to be better educated and motivated to creating a new cooperative society.
 
In politics, you’re often told not to get lost in the weeds. But we love the weeds! That’s where politics becomes policy – the stuff that shapes our lives. Every Tuesday and Friday, host Matthew Yglesias is joined by Vox reporters and editors, ProPublica's Dara Lind, and some of the leading minds in policy to dig into the weeds on important national issues, including healthcare, immigration, housing, and everything else that matters. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
The Guardian's political editor, Heather Stewart, and deputy political editor, Jessica Elgot, are joined by commentators, experts and politicians to unpack the week's biggest stories in politics. In Politics Weekly Extra on Fridays, Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland invites guests to help analyse the latest in US politics
 
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show series
 
Political parties are taken for granted today, but how was the idea of party viewed in the eighteenth century, when core components of modern, representative politics were trialled? From Bolingbroke to Burke, political thinkers regarded party as a fundamental concept of politics, especially in the parliamentary system of Great Britain. The paradox …
 
For this episode LAP coordinator Alex Scott met with LAP associate managing editor Steve Ellner to discuss his edited book titled Latin America’s Pink Tide: Breakthroughs and Shortcomings, recent events in progressive politics in Latin America and the current state of the pink tide
 
In June, the Food and Drug Administration gave marketing approval to the Alzheimer’s drug Aduhelm, against the unanimous advice of its advisory panel. Three of the panel’s five members resigned in protest. The panel’s members and many other medical experts claim there is no convincing evidence that the drug provides clinical benefit. Other critics …
 
Do rocks found in Canada show animal life 350 million years older than any found before? And, delving to the core of Mars, the guts of cats, and into the life of Steven Weinberg. Prof Elizabeth Turner of Canada's Laurentian University reports in the journal Nature structures in some of the oldest sedimentary rocks that resemble the residue left by …
 
Antony talks with Nate and Charles, co-hosts of the Good Morning Liberty podcast. Get Your Copy of Cooperation and Coercion Now! http://www.cooperationandcoercion.com Show Your Support for Words & Numbers at Patreon https://www.patreon.com/wordsandnumbers Good Morning Liberty Podcast https://cms.megaphone.fm/channel/goodmorningliberty?selected=ADV2…
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 210731 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 詭老 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p1 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/516Io5hS_hk MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/210731jnzasz/sp210731a.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 210731 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 詭老 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p2 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/ZQlauJDRiRI MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/210731jnzasz/sp210731b.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 210731 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 詭老 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p3 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/Utajb0yoqWE MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/210731jnzasz/sp210731c.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
梁錦祥節目 影碟情報室 210731 主持 梁錦祥 紀陶 主題 詭老 MyRadio Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/myradiohk MyRadio月費計劃詳情及常見問題 http://myradio.hk/podcast/?page_id=8990 p4 of 4 YouTube: https://youtu.be/nrT_pPnet9w MP3: http://www.archive.org/download/210731jnzasz/sp210731d.mp3By 梁錦祥節目 | MyRadio.hk
 
It’s the Veterans Call in special and our guests for this month's edition are Pete Santilli and Tyler Nixon. Pete gets into his experience as a political prisoner and talks about how we can win this battle for free the January 6th political prisoners. Tyler Nixon gets into it from a legal perspective and how so many rights are being violated in thi…
 
Matt is joined by Liza Reed of the Niskanen Center to talk about energy policy, electricity transmission, and how America's complex system of power grids really function. Resources: "Transmission Stalled: Siting Challenges for Interregional Transmission" by Liza Reed (April 14) Summary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPA) Guest: Liza Reed (@LizaB…
 
Climate change is already devastating lives and livelihoods every year. With heatwaves, floods, wildfires and other extreme weather events becoming more common in the UK and around the world, all countries need to adapt and build resilience. So as the UK prepares to host COP26, the UK presidency has placed climate adaptation at the heart of its age…
 
Democrats are going mask insane once again, Covid breakthrough infection panic is spreading and a CDC document says "The War has changed." Please subscribe to the podcast! And get more exclusive content from Buck at BuckSexton.com. Find Buck on: Twitter @BuckSexton Facebook @BuckSexton Instagram @BuckSexton Email the Podcast: TeamBuck@IHeartMedia.c…
 
Hello everyone, some great news! My short spy film “The Dry Cleaner” will screen online for one week from 8th August 2021 for free, as part of the SPYFLIX Film festival “Spotlight series”. The film will be available to watch here from 8th August: https://watch.spyflix.com You can watch the trailer here: https://youtu.be/rFX9cyaMlww The Dry Cleaner …
 
In this episode Rafael Behr talks to Cambridge University political psychologist Dr Lee de-Wit about the problem with progressive arguments over patriotism, and Labour's constant struggle to connect with socially conservative voters. Links mentioned in this episode: Dr Lee de-Wit's Cambridge University homepage https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/people/…
 
Our federal capital, Washington, D.C., is a unique part of the United States. Washington, D.C. was established by the Constitution, and its exact location selected by President George Washington in 1790. Its status as a district rather than a state gives it a distinctive governing structure that has often been a source of contention for its residen…
 
In Writing Kit Carson: Fallen Heroes in a Changing West (UNC Press, 2020), Susan Lee Johnson braids together lives over time and space, telling tales of two white women who, in the 1960s, wrote books about the fabled frontiersman Christopher Kit Carson: Quantrille McClung, a Denver librarian who compiled the Carson-Bent-Boggs Genealogy, and Kansas-…
 
Ben Railton's book Of Thee I Sing: The Contested History of American Patriotism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021) is a cogently written history of the idea of American patriotism. Railton argues that there are four distinct forms of patriotism as practiced in the United States (U.S.) including (1) celebratory, or the communal expression of an idealized …
 
A short and entertaining narrative of France from prehistory to the present, recounting the great events and personalities that helped create France’s cultural and political influence today. Country and destination, nation and idea, France has a rich and complex history that fascinates the world and attracts millions of visitors each year to its ch…
 
While i find it pretty easy to recognize when i'm reading articles in complexity science, i've never been satisfied by definitions of complexity and related concepts. I'm not alone! Researchers' own attempts to define complex systems incorporate a mix of folk wisdom and fraught assumptions anchored to a menagerie of contested examples. The field wa…
 
In her magnificent and lyrical new book, The Emperor Who Never Was: Dara Shukoh in Mughal India (Harvard UP, 2020), Supriya Gandhi reorients and adds unprecedented depth to our understanding of the much memorialized but less understood Mughal prince and thinker Dara Shukoh (d. 1659), and of his broader political and social milieu. Written with exce…
 
The Science of Siren Songs: Stradivari Unveiled is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and master violinmaker and acoustician Joseph Curtin, recipient of a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. This in-depth conversation explores Curtin’s long quest to characterize the sound of a Stradivari violin and the rigorous series of d…
 
Ben Railton's book Of Thee I Sing: The Contested History of American Patriotism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021) is a cogently written history of the idea of American patriotism. Railton argues that there are four distinct forms of patriotism as practiced in the United States (U.S.) including (1) celebratory, or the communal expression of an idealized …
 
Teaching cross-cultural communication is challenging at the best of times, but how can Nordic students learn to engage with Asian cultures when they are forced to study entirely online? Award-winning teacher Annelise Ly tells NIAS Director Duncan McCargo why it’s good to show her messy home on camera, why she doesn’t give lectures, why virtual coff…
 
Throughout her career, spanning more than two decades, Jessica Hopper, a revered and pioneering music critic, has examined women recording and producing music, in all genres, through an intersectional feminist lens. The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic (MCD x Fsg Originals, 2021) features oral histories of bands like Hol…
 
Talia Lakshmi Kolluri speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her story “The Good Donkey,” which appears in The Common’s spring issue. In this conversation, Kolluri talks about writing fiction from the perspectives of different animals, and where the inspiration for those stories comes from. She also discusses how being mixed race can complic…
 
Political parties are taken for granted today, but how was the idea of party viewed in the eighteenth century, when core components of modern, representative politics were trialled? From Bolingbroke to Burke, political thinkers regarded party as a fundamental concept of politics, especially in the parliamentary system of Great Britain. The paradox …
 
The story of how the American military—and more particularly the regular army—has played a vital role in the late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century United States that extended beyond the battlefield is the focus of Robert Wooster’s The United States Army and the Making of America: From Confederation to Empire, 1775–1903 (University Press of Kansas…
 
What Is Religious Authority?: Cultivating Islamic Communities in Indonesia (Princeton UP, 2021) by Ismail Fajrie Alatas draws on groundbreaking anthropological insights to provide a new understanding of Islamic religious authority, showing how religious leaders unite diverse aspects of life and contest differing Muslim perspectives to create distin…
 
Last December, a month before his inauguration, Biden announced he was naming former secretary of state John Kerry as the first ever presidential envoy for climate as part of his plan to deal with the crisis. Joan E Greve talks to Oliver Milman about what Biden’s climate change plans are, what challenges he’s up against and if he and John Kerry can…
 
Continuing from the last episode, Lindsey backs up her claim that the bulk of the terrible science was yet to come. WOW. This study was complete garbage. You really ought to hear how terrible it is. Lindsey, as usual, did other people's homework for them. She got a hold of some of the data and did her own work with it, which revealed some interesti…
 
The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rochelle Walensky, said in a recent TV interview that a European-style health pass may be the way forward in dealing with COVID-19. And in other news, lockdowns for the virus are going in place in countries around the world as the new Delta variant spreads. In this live Q&A with Crossr…
 
The popular conception of ants is that “anatomy is destiny”: an ant’s body type determines its role in the colony, for once and ever. But this is not the case; rather than forming rigid castes, ants act like a distributed computer in which tasks are re-allocated as the situation changes. “Division of labor” implies a constant “assembly line” enviro…
 
Mark Blyth, political economist at Brown's Watson Institute, and Carrie Nordlund, political scientist and associate director of Brown's Annenberg Institute, share their take on the week's news.On this episode: the Delta variant spreads the globe; the economy is doing great and has reverted to the mean (or it isn't and it hasn't); Carrie's Olympic f…
 
The very few Congressmen actually concerned about the torturous conditions of the January 6th political prisoners find themselves stymied and abused at every turn. Meanwhile, The New York Times admits that there was no “coup” and that the Capitol Protestors were expressing legitimate grievances. The Atlantic calls Mike Lindell an existential threat…
 
The ongoing probe may have implications for the 2022 midterm race and for President Biden’s promise to tackle white supremacist violence. What might findings reveal about where the U.S. is headed? And what can the hearings tell us about what’s to come? Republicans voice opposition to Jan. 6 investigation as police officers call for accountability W…
 
Do rocks found in Canada show animal life 350 million years older than any found before?And, delving to the core of Mars, the guts of cats, and into the life of Steven Weinberg.Prof Elizabeth Turner of Canada's Laurentian University reports in the journal Nature structures in some of the oldest sedimentary rocks that resemble the residue left by sp…
 
The CDC is continuing to make a mockery of itself, The Department Of Justice is doing the left's bidding on voting, Senator Schumer says climate change will be worse than Covid and teachers unions are lying again. Please subscribe to the podcast! And get more exclusive content from Buck at BuckSexton.com. Find Buck on: Twitter @BuckSexton Facebook …
 
With the Tokyo Olympics under way, we revisit a conversation from 2020 with Megan Rapinoe, captain of the U.S. women’s national soccer team and Olympic gold medalist. At the time, Rapinoe was skeptical about the future of the 2020 games. Megan joined David to talk about growing up in a small conservative town, finding and forging her identity, her …
 
Retaining Freedom After Speech Today I talked to Jim Detert about his book Choosing Courage: The Everyday Guide to Being Brave at Work (Harvard Business Review Press, 2021) Jim Detert is the John L. Colley Professor of Business Administration at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. He’s won multiple awards for his teaching and cu…
 
Russia’s position between Europe and Asia has led to differing conceptions of “what Russia is” to its leaders. Russia’s vast holdings east of the Urals have often inspired those who led Russia to look eastward for national glory, whether through trade, soft power, or outright force. Yet these Russian “pivots to Asia” often ended soon after they beg…
 
Development economists have been doing intensive research in recent years on conditional cash transfer programs as a tool to help get people out of poverty. Meanwhile in the US there has been a lot of talk about Universal Basic Income as a remedy for inequality and social disclocations. On paper, China’s Minimum Livelihood Guarantee, or Dibao, soun…
 
Today I talked to Kevin McGruder about his new book Philip Payton: The Father of Black Harlem (Columbia UP, 2021) In a moment of hope, even faith, African-Americans inspired by Booker T. Washington believed at the start of the 21st century that prospering financially would lead them to fair and even-standing with their fellow white citizens in Amer…
 
Phantoms of a Beleaguered Republic: The Deep State and the Unitary Executive (Oxford UP, 2021) helps us think about the complexity of the American political system that has grown up over the past 200 years, and how this system functions (or, at times, misfunctions) given the demands and pressures on the governmental system and the American constitu…
 
The Value of Voice is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Nick Couldry, Professor of Media, Communications and Social Theory in the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics. This wide-ranging conversation explores how the media can be used as a filter to examine power structures, politi…
 
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