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Racism, toxic inequality, persistent poverty, climate change: these are big serious problems, and if you believe they require big audacious solutions, then this is the podcast for you. Hosted by Angela Glover Blackwell, Founder-in-Residence at PolicyLink, Radical Imagination focuses on radical solutions to our society’s most pressing problems. It features conversations with thinkers and changemakers from multiple fields working to deliver equity wins at scale.Tune in to Radical Imagination, ...
 
Welcome to Future Positive a podcast from XPRIZE that aims to bring you the most future-forward topics, covering everything from AI to avatars, to climate change, and more. We will share conversations from game-changing leaders, tech entrepreneurs and heavyweights from the creative industry - revealing their inspirations, and how and why they will change the world. If you’re into data-driven optimism, this is the podcast for you. © 2020 XPRIZE Foundation. All rights reserved See acast.com/pr ...
 
The Radcast is one of the fastest-growing marketing podcasts in the US. Featuring marketing tips, trends, industry stories, and an amazing guest lineup, The Radcast is hosted by 20-year marketing executive, entrepreneur, and CEO of Radical Company, Ryan Alford. Ryan interviews a number of influential marketers and entrepreneurs from across the US while adding insight and recommendations for business owners and marketers. As the name suggests, The Radcast isn't afraid to cross the boundaries ...
 
Welcome to Innovation+ Talks. Each week our host, Paul Heller talks at the executive level about how strategic innovation and new product development are essential for thriving in the modern marketplace. Paul is regularly joined by top executives and cross-industry thought leaders who share their unique insights and key learnings garnered from decades of experience.
 
AIIM On Air with Kevin Craine - where we explore the methods, technologies, processes, and people on the front lines of information management. AIIM believes information is your most important asset. Learn the skills to manage it. Find us at aiim.org.
 
Uncover the deeply human aspect of working. Join Jeff Hunt, GoalSpan CEO and longtime business consultant, as he interviews guests who help us learn to embrace the value of human capital in new ways. Explore how to better the world of work for humans and rediscover the most important asset we have in the workplace – Human Capital.
 
Equivalent to Magic is a podcast about the wizards behind the world’s most influential companies and tech platforms. Two veteran tech executives, Steve Herrod and Quentin Clark, talk with CTOs, CPOs, and engineers about how they dreamed, designed and managed their way to scale. The show is produced by General Catalyst.
 
AI. Social Media. Blockchain. Gene-edited babies. Are these the greatest innovations in history or the greatest threat to humanity? Humanity, Wired makes sense of the human rights impact of technology today and tomorrow. Host Amy Lehr, Human Rights Initiative director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington D.C., sits down with human rights defenders, policymakers and technologists to discuss how to make technology work for us, not against us.
 
Explore hundreds of lectures by scientists, historians, artists, entrepreneurs, and more through The Long Now Foundation's award-winning lecture series, curated and hosted by Long Now co-founder Stewart Brand (creator of the Whole Earth Catalog). Recorded live in San Francisco each month since 02003, past speakers include Brian Eno, Neil Gaiman, Sylvia Earle, Daniel Kahneman, Jennifer Pahlka, Steven Johnson, and many more. Watch video of these talks and learn more about our projects at Longn ...
 
Each Tuesday and Friday, Ezra Klein invites you into a conversation on something that matters. How do we address climate change if the political system fails to act? Has the logic of markets infiltrated too many aspects of our lives? What is the future of the Republican Party? What do psychedelics teach us about consciousness? What does sci-fi understand about our present that we miss? Can our food system be just to humans and animals alike?
 
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James Macfarlane is the owner and CEO of Easypress Technologies. He was previously the CEO and founder of BookGenie451 and a founder of Sopheon, working in the role of Vice President of Global Business Development. James is a Business Mentor in early-stage business growth through SetSquared Partnership’s Investor Readiness Program. He has a Master …
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
On this episode of the Economic and Business History channel I spoke with Dr. Chinmay Tumbe, Assistant Professor of Economics at the Indian Institute of Management. He was Alfred D Chandler Jr. International Visiting Scholar in Business History, Harvard Business School in 2018. Dr, Tumbe has published academic articles in Management and Organizatio…
 
You’ve heard plenty by now about the fights over teaching critical race theory and the 1619 Project. But behind those skirmishes is something deeper: A fight over the story we tell about America. Why that fight has so gripped our national discourse is the question of this podcast: What changes when a country’s sense of its own history changes? What…
 
Welcome to this week's episode of The Radcast! In this week's news episode, host Ryan Alford and co-host Josh Hill with special guests Joey, Joe, and Sean recaps quasi-celebrity guests, discuss Google's advertising revenue, Dr. Diabolical’s Cliffhanger, today’s International Day of Friendship, and more... These are the following topics we hit in to…
 
While i find it pretty easy to recognize when i'm reading articles in complexity science, i've never been satisfied by definitions of complexity and related concepts. I'm not alone! Researchers' own attempts to define complex systems incorporate a mix of folk wisdom and fraught assumptions anchored to a menagerie of contested examples. The field wa…
 
The Science of Siren Songs: Stradivari Unveiled is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and master violinmaker and acoustician Joseph Curtin, recipient of a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. This in-depth conversation explores Curtin’s long quest to characterize the sound of a Stradivari violin and the rigorous series of d…
 
The ‘Two Cultures’ debate of the 1960s between C.P. Snow and F.R. Leavis is one of the most misunderstood intellectual disputes of the 20th century. Most people think that the debate only revolved around the notion that our society is characterized by a divide between two cultures – the arts or humanities on one hand, and the sciences on the other.…
 
Chris Surdak discusses his book "The Care and Feeding of Bots," and how to use robotic process automation successfully. Chris is a leading expert in big data and analytics. He's been with us before talking about his books "Data Crush" and "Jerk." And if you’ve wondered what all the fuss is about when it comes to process automation, or if you’ve bee…
 
Am I too panicked about the future of American democracy? My colleague Ross Douthat thinks so. He points to research suggesting that voter ID laws and absentee voting have modest effects on elections and the reality that Republican state officials already have tremendous power to alter election outcomes — powers they did not use in the aftermath of…
 
Welcome to this week’s episode on The Radcast! Get ready for Ben Higgins, Entrepreneur, Author, Podcast Host and ‘The Bachelor’ Alum. In this episode on The Radcast, host Ryan Alford talks with guest Ben Higgins about the “Business of being The Bachelor”, what inspired him to write his book “Alone in Plain Sight”, his relationship with Chris Harris…
 
In Mapping Beyond Measure: Art, Cartography, and the Space of Global Modernity (U Nebraska Press, 2019), Simon Ferdinand analyzes diverse map-based works of painting, collage, film, walking performance, and digital drawing, made in Britain, Japan, the Netherlands, Ukraine, the United States, and the former Soviet Union, arguing that together they c…
 
Jeff explores how to address unconscious bias, microaggressions, and exclusionary behavior in the workplace – specifically using virtual reality. Jeff’s guest Myra LalDin, believes in the power of stories to create empathy, shape values, change behaviors, and share experiences. Myra studied cross-cultural business management, and later, cognitive s…
 
Noel Sobelman is the Principal Innovation Practice Lead at Change Logic, where he works with corporate leadership to accelerate core business vitality and new-growth business. Noel has led venture programs that received national accolades, including USA Today/Rochester Institute of Technology’s Quality Cup, PR Week’s Best High Tech Consumer Launch,…
 
The 1980s saw the peak of a moral panic over fantasy role-playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons. A coalition of moral entrepreneurs that included representatives from the Christian Right, the field of psychology, and law enforcement claimed that these games were not only psychologically dangerous but an occult religion masquerading as a game. …
 
The world is in a midst of a renewable energy revolution, with the price of utility scale photo-voltaic solar power falling by nearly 90% between 2009 and 2019, and the price of wind power falling by 70% during the same period. Annual global investment in renewable electricity generation assets is now more than double that for fossil fuel and nucle…
 
Historian Eszter Varsa’s new book Protected Children, Regulated Mothers: Gender and the 'Gypsy Question' in State Care in Postwar Hungary, 1949–1956 (Central European UP, 2020) examines child protection in Stalinist Hungary as a part of twentieth-century East Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European history. Across the communist bloc, the prewar…
 
Philosophy of Brain is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and neurophilosopher Patricia Churchland, UC San Diego. Patricia Churchland has done extensive research in the fields of philosophy of neuroscience, philosophy of the mind and neuroethics. During this mind-stretching conversation Patricia explores how the brain wo…
 
In a world that purports to know more about the future than any before it, why do we still need speculation? Insubstantial speculations – from utopian thinking to high-risk stock gambles – often provoke backlash, even when they prove prophetic. Why does this hypothetical way of thinking generate such controversy? Gayle Rogers, author of Speculation…
 
XPRIZE Founder Peter H. Diamandis is in conversation with His Excellency Faisal Al Bannai, the Secretary-General of the Advanced Technology Research Council at ASPIRE, partner and sponsor of XPRIZE Feed The Next Billion. Tune in to hear these industry leaders discuss the fight against global food insecurity. His Excellency Faisal Al Bannai, Secreta…
 
Joe Biden’s economic agenda is centered on a basic premise: The United States needs to build. To build roads and bridges. To build child care facilities and car-charging stations. To build public transit and affordable housing. And in doing so, to build a better future for everyone. But there’s a twist of irony in that vision. Because right now, ev…
 
Welcome to this week's episode of The Radcast! In this week's news episode, host Ryan Alford and co-host Josh Hill recaps quasi-celebrity guests, discuss Bezos Space Flight, NBA Finals, Olympics, Dr.Dre paying $300 alimony, and more... These are the following topics we hit in today's episode: Tiktok Marketers Can Now Directly Sponsor Trending Creat…
 
What would it feel like to wake up inside the head of someone who writes about science for a living? John Horgan, acclaimed author of the bestseller The End of Science, answers that question in his genre-bending new book Pay Attention: Sex, Death, and Science (MIT Press, 2020), a stream-of-consciousness account of a day in the life of his alter ego…
 
The image most of us have of whalers includes harpoons and intentional trauma. Yet eating commercially caught seafood leads to whales' entanglement and slow death in rope and nets, and the global shipping routes that bring us readily available goods often lead to death by collision. We--all of us--are whalers, marine scientist and veterinarian Mich…
 
In Radiant Infrastructures: Media, Environment, and Cultures of Uncertainty (Duke UP, 2020), Rahul Mukherjee explores how the media coverage of nuclear power plants and cellular phone antennas in India—what he calls radiant infrastructures—creates environmental publics: groups of activists, scientists, and policy makers who use media to influence p…
 
What influence can online and visual activism have on protest movements? With a wave of anti-establishment protests sweeping over East and Southeast Asia over the past couple of years, the online phenomenon of the #MilkTeaAlliance has gained increasing international recognition. In this episode of the Nordic Asia Podcast Chiara Elisabeth Pecorari i…
 
As Covid-19 continues to sweep the world and most countries, especially in the Global South, struggle to access vaccines, Radical Imagination takes a fresh look at how the US patent system keeps billions of people at home and abroad from obtaining life-saving medicines. Since our first episode on this topic, early in the pandemic, the situation has…
 
In Epidemic Illusions: On the Coloniality of Global Public Health (MIT Press, 2020), physician-anthropologist Eugene T. Richardson explores how public health practices—from epidemiological modeling to outbreak containment—help perpetuate global inequities. This book questions the Global North's "monopoly on truth" in global public health science, m…
 
Drawing together 18 contributions from leading international scholars, Cinema of Exploration: Essays on an Adventurous Film Practice (Routledge, 2021) conceptualizes the history and theory of cinema’s century-long relationship to modes of exploration in its many forms, from colonialist expeditions to decolonial radical cinemas to the perceptual voy…
 
Andrew Jenks' book Collaboration in Space and the Search for Peace on Earth (Anthem Press, 2021) explores the era of space collaboration (from 1970 to the present). This period has been largely ignored by historians in favor of a focus on the earlier space race. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, a key program and catalyst for Détente, marked the trans…
 
For decades, our society’s dominant metaphor for the mind has been a computer. A machine that operates the exact same way whether it’s in a dark room or next to a sunny window, whether it’s been working for 30 seconds or three hours, whether it’s near other computers or completely alone. But that’s wrong. Annie Murphy Paul’s “The Extended Mind” arg…
 
Welcome to this week’s episode on The Radcast! Get ready for Marty Smith, Writer, Producer, Author of New York Times Best Seller 'Never Settle', Sports Journalist Reporter of ESPN.. In this episode on The Radcast, host Ryan Alford talks with guest Marty Smith about his journey, what moulded him as a person, and how he landed the job at ESPN. Marty …
 
It’s hard to imagine a place more central to American mythology today than Silicon Valley. To outsiders, the region glitters with the promise of extraordinary wealth and innovation. But behind this image lies another Silicon Valley, one segregated by race, class, and nationality in complex and contradictory ways. Its beautiful landscape lies atop u…
 
Through various international case studies presented by both practitioners and scholars, Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene: From (Un)Just Presents to Just Futures (Routledge, 2021) explores how an environmental justice approach is necessary for reflections on inequality in the Anthropocene and for forging societal transitions toward a more …
 
Failure in resource planning is a controversial topic. Resource planning takes place by taking measurable and quantifiable facts—such as the time it takes one person to complete a task—and dividing them into the required output to determine the resources needed. It is relatively straightforward and can be calculated. Resource planning is a common p…
 
Death and the dead body have never been more alive in the public imagination--not least because of current debates over modern medical technology that is deployed, it seems, expressly to keep human bodies from dying, blurring the boundary between alive and dead. In Technologies of the Human Corpse (MIT Press, 2020), John Troyer examines the relatio…
 
Listen to this interview of Terry McGlynn, author of The Chicago Guide to College Science Teaching (U Chicago Press, 2020). McGlynn is also a professor of biology at California State University Dominguez Hills and research associate in the Department of Entomology in the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. We talk about learning, actually…
 
“What if instead of a feelings advocacy we had an outcome advocacy that put equitable outcomes before our guilt and anguish?” wrote Ibram X. Kendi in his 2019 book “How to Be an Antiracist.” “What if we focused our human and fiscal resources on changing power and policy to actually make society, not just our feelings, better?” When I first read “Ho…
 
Welcome to this week's episode of The Radcast! In this week's news episode, host Ryan Alford and co-host Josh Hill discuss Shark Week, British Open/NBA Finals - Bucks/Suns, HypeBeast top brands, The Best of Tik Tok, and more... These are the following topics we hit in today's episode: Facebook Commits $1 Billion To Pay Creators - Per HypeBeast Jeff…
 
From the ancient world to the present women have been critical to the progress of science, yet their importance is overlooked, their stories lost, distorted, or actively suppressed. Forces of Nature sets the record straight and charts the fascinating history of women's discoveries in science. In the ancient and medieval world, women served as royal…
 
Back in March 2020, David Burt and Phil Hayes-St Clair gave a prescient, pointed presentation on what this thing called COVID-19 might mean for the Australian Start-up Community - listen here: https://player.whooshkaa.com/episode?id=596861 Over a year later, I asked them to take stock of the events that have happened since then, where reality match…
 
In 1928 linguist Yuen Ren Chao had reason to celebrate. The Nationalist government had just recognized his system for writing Chinese, Gwoyeu Romatzyh, so he gleefully wrote (using the system) in his diary: "G.R. yii yu jeou yueh 26 ry gong buh le. Hooray!!!" (G.R. was officially announced on September 26. Hooray!!!). He was not the only one excite…
 
The digital age has touched and changed pretty much everything, even altering how historical research is practiced. In his new book Technology and the Historian: Transformations in the Digital Age (University of Illinois Press, 2021), Adam Crymble makes a meta-historical account of how digital and technological advances have impacted historical res…
 
Today on New Books in Gender Studies Jana Byars talks with Lindy McDougall, of Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia about her new book, The Perfect Vagina: Cosmetic Surgery in the Twenty-First Century, out this year, 2021, with Indiana University Press. In The Perfect Vagina, Lindy McDougall provides an ethnographic account of women who choose…
 
Literature is a technology like any other. And the writers we revere--from Homer, Shakespeare, Austen, and others--each made a unique technical breakthrough that can be viewed as both a narrative and neuroscientific advancement. Literature's great invention was to address problems we could not solve: not how to start a fire or build a boat, but how…
 
I’ve spent the past few months on an octopus kick. In that, I don’t seem to be alone. Octopuses (it’s incorrect to say “octopi,” to my despair) are having a moment: There are award-winning books, documentaries and even science fiction about them. I suspect it’s the same hunger that leaves many of us yearning to know aliens: How do radically differe…
 
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