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Death, Sex & Money is a podcast about the big questions and hard choices that are often left out of polite conversation. Host Anna Sale talks to celebrities you've heard of—and to regular people you haven't—about the Big Stuff: relationships, money, family, work and making it all count while we're here. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, The Experiment, The New Yorker Radio Hour and many others.
 
Politics Brief is the go-to source for 2018 election news, selected from the best WNYC has to offer. Daily segments include original reporting on the New York metro region, along with interviews and analysis focused on the national scene from groundbreaking shows like On the Media, The Takeaway and The New Yorker Radio Hour. Produced by WNYC Studios, home of other great podcasts including Radiolab, Snap Judgment, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin. Category: News & Politics
 
What the hell is Super Tuesday and where does it come from? Why does Iowa vote first? What’s a caucus? Who gets to be a delegate? How to Vote in America is a weekly micro podcast that tries to make sense of our crazy democracy and what seems like a never-ending 2020 election process. In this podcast, we take small bites at big issues to help you understand something most people should, but probably don’t: voting. Hosted by The Takeaway’s Politics Host Amy Walter. WNYC Studios is a listener-s ...
 
It’s been 50 years since the uprising at the Stonewall Inn—an event that is widely considered to be the catalyst for the LGBTQ civil rights movement. To commemorate this moment, we’re bringing you an all new podcast series that celebrates queer stories and voices. Join Kathy Tu and Tobin Low, hosts of the Nancy podcast, for a special series of episodes that explore how this moment in history—and the setback and achievements that followed—have shaped the LGBTQ experience today. For more on ou ...
 
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After Joe Biden won Arizona in 2020, Donald Trump began complaining, contrary to fact, that voter fraud took place there and across the country, stealing the election from him. Four audits have since taken place in Arizona, upholding Biden’s victory, but donors are funding yet another ballot count, this time run by the firm Cyber Ninjas. Jane Mayer…
 
In the first of three financial therapy sessions, a couple we're calling Cora and Garrett talk with therapist Amanda Clayman about the events that led to a breakdown of financial trust between them. Financial Therapy with Amanda Clayman is a special series from Death, Sex & Money. Listen to past episodes here. If you or a loved one is in crisis, pl…
 
Sarah Braunstein reads her story “Superstition,” from the August 9, 2021, issue of the magazine. Braunstein is the author of the novel “The Sweet Relief of Missing Children,” which won the 2012 Maine Literary Award for Fiction and a recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 Award.By WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
Jack Antonoff has had a busy pandemic. Sought out by Taylor Swift as a producer, he ultimately made two records for her—one of which, “Folklore,” won the Grammy for Album of the Year. He also worked on albums for Lorde, Lana Del Rey, and Clairo that are out or forthcoming this year. And Antonoff just released his own new record, “Take The Sadness o…
 
With the world overheating, glaciers melting, and landscapes in flames, it’s difficult to think of a harder or more important job than John Kerry’s. The former senator and Secretary of State is now the special Presidential envoy for climate, a Cabinet-level post created by President Biden. Kerry talks with David Remnick about reasserting the United…
 
Ann Patchett joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Proxy Marriage,” by Maile Meloy, which was published in The New Yorker in 2012. Patchett is the author of eight novels, including “Commonwealth” and “The Dutch House,” which was a finalist for last year’s Pulitzer Prize.By WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
With the world overheating, glaciers melting, and landscapes in flames, it’s difficult to think of a harder or more important job than John Kerry’s. The former senator and Secretary of State is now the special Presidential envoy for climate, a Cabinet-level post created by President Biden. Kerry talks with David Remnick about reasserting the United…
 
In the immediate aftermath of January 6th, politicians from both parties vilified the mob’s assault. But Republicans scuttled plans for an independent commission to investigate the riot, and the select committee organized by House Democrats has been repeatedly attacked by Republicans. Still, this week, on the first day of hearings, several officers…
 
Tessa Hadley reads her story “Coda,” from the August 2, 2021, issue of the magazine. Hadley has published ten books of fiction, including the story collection “Bad Dreams and Other Stories” and the novel “Late In the Day,” which was published in 2019. She is a winner of the 2016 Wyndham-Campbell literature prize.…
 
The indictment reads like a not-so-great spy novel: the operatives would kidnap the dissident from her home in Brooklyn, deliver her to the waterfront to meet a speedboat, bring her by sea to Venezuela, and then move her on to Tehran—where she would, presumably, face a show trial, and perhaps execution. But this was no potboiler. The Iranian nation…
 
The New York City mayoral primary, which culminated in a vote held in June, was full of surprises, including the introduction of ranked-choice voting to a confused electorate, and the presence of Andrew Yang, a newcomer to municipal politics who quickly attained front-runner status. But the winning Democrat was no surprise. Eric Adams is the boroug…
 
The New York City mayoral primary, which culminated in a vote held in June, was full of surprises, including the introduction of ranked-choice voting to a confused electorate, and the presence of Andrew Yang, a newcomer to municipal politics who quickly attained front-runner status. But the winning Democrat was no surprise. Eric Adams is the boroug…
 
Radiolab producer Rachael Cusick talks together with her grandmother about their shared loss, and about their experiences with Elisabeth Kübler-Ross's five stages of grief. Listen to Rachael's Radiolab episode "The Queen of Dying," about the story and legacy of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross. And read Rachael Cusick's Modern Love essay for The New York Time…
 
The opening ceremony for the 2020 Summer Olympics, in Tokyo, is scheduled for Friday. With COVID{:.small}-19 cases spiking worldwide, and Japan under a state of emergency, many wonder whether the Olympics should be cancelled. Angela Ruggiero competed in four Olympic Games as a member of the U.S. Women’s Hockey Team, winning a gold medal at the 1998…
 
Shabana Basij-Rasikh is the co-founder of Afghanistan’s only all-girls boarding school, and she is anxiously waiting to see if the Taliban—which brutally opposes the education of girls and women—will make inroads in Kabul. “I was speaking with a young woman,” Basij-Rasikh told the staff writer Sue Halpern, “and she said, ‘Yes, sure, the Taliban wil…
 
Since the U.S. withdrawal began, Taliban forces have re-captured more than a quarter of Afghanistan’s districts. Shabana Basij-Rasikh is the co-founder of the country’s only all-girls boarding school, and she is anxiously waiting to see if the Taliban—which brutally opposes the education of girls and women—will make inroads in Kabul. At SOLA, the S…
 
Marcia Chatelain, a historian at Georgetown, recently won the Pulitzer Prize for History for her book “Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America.” Chatelain looks at how McDonald’s leveraged the social upheaval of the nineteen-sixties to gain a permanent foothold in Black communities across the country. McDonald’s strategically positioned franc…
 
This week, protests erupted in cities and towns across Cuba as people responded to food and medicine shortages, and to a gutted economy made even worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, Haiti is facing widespread instability after the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse. President Biden's foreign policy thus far has focused on the th…
 
I talk with the writer about going through fertility treatments in her late 30s, and why being "on the IVF train" made her get more comfortable with situations out of her control. Have you had to jump through medical or legal hoops to start a family? Tell us the moment you realized that becoming a parent was going to be more difficult than you expe…
 
The U.S. economy seems to be showing real signs of life, and lots of people are finally returning to the labor force—eight hundred and fifty thousand in the month of June alone. At the same time, job resignations are at a record high, and many workers are changing careers. With work life at top of mind, we asked three writers to tell us about the m…
 
Britney Spears has been one of the world’s most prominent pop stars since her début, in the late nineteen-nineties. But, since 2008, she’s been under a court-ordered conservatorship—a form of legal guardianship—which has restricted nearly all aspects of her life. Details about the arrangement have been kept out of public view, all while Spears has …
 
In the winter of 2007, a songwriter by the name of Justin Vernon returned to the Wisconsin woods, not far from where he grew up. Just a few months later, he emerged with “For Emma, Forever Ago”—his first album produced under the name Bon Iver. Since then, Vernon and various bandmates have released three more records, won two Grammys, and collaborat…
 
When musician Johnny Solomon hit rock bottom, he turned to his mom for help. As his mom's health declines, he and his wife—and bandmate—move in with her to reciprocate. Check out our podcast playlist roundup of recent audio recommendations from our newsletter here. And if you're not already subscribed to our newsletter, sign up! Every Wednesday we …
 
Rebecca Curtis reads her story “Satellites,” from the July 12 & 19, 2021, issue of the magazine. Curtis is the author of the story collection “Twenty Grand: And Other Tales of Love and Money” and a winner of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award for Fiction.By WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
Janet Mock first heard the word “māhū,” a Native Hawaiian word for people who exist outside the male-female binary, when she was twelve. She had just moved back to Oahu, where she was born, from Texas, and, by that point, Mock knew that the gender she presented as didn’t feel right. “I don’t like to say the word ‘trapped,’ ” Mock tells The New York…
 
In the years leading up to the horrific Tulsa massacre of 1921, the Greenwood district was a thriving Black metropolis, a city within a city. Buoyed by money from Oklahoma’s oil boom, it was home to the original Cotton Club and to one of the first Black-owned daily newspapers in the United States, the Tulsa Star. The Star’s founder and editor was A…
 
Britney Spears has been one of the world’s most prominent pop stars since her début, in the late nineteen-nineties. But, since 2008, she’s been under a court-ordered conservatorship—a form of legal guardianship—which has restricted nearly all aspects of her life. Details about the arrangement have been kept out of public view, all while Spears has …
 
In September, 2020, the writer Christopher Rufo appeared on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” to discuss the threat posed by “critical race theory.” Rufo had come across the term while looking into the origins of the anti-racism movement, and saw its potential as a conservative target. In the months since, critical race theory has been condemned by Presiden…
 
Sam Lipsyte reads his story “My Apology,” from the July 5, 2021, issue of the magazine. Lipsyte is the author of six books of fiction, including the story collection “The Fun Parts,” and the novels “The Ask” and “Hark,” which was published in 2019.By WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
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